Weather unit

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by Deeena, Mar 3, 2007.

  1. Deeena

    Deeena Cohort

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    Mar 3, 2007

    Hi,

    I am starting a unit on weather/seasons in science. I am looking for some ideas to supplement what is already in our science curriculum. I'm starting the first section is on wind and so far I was thinking we could:
    - make kites
    - do an experiment with a fan to see if the objects blow away or not
    - make class book on the wind

    Anyway, any other ideas for wind and other types of weather is appreciated.
     
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  3. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 4, 2007

    I Face The Wind by Vikki Cobb is a good beginning science weather book. I have used Little Cloud by Eric Carle to introduce clouds (not a scientific book but very short and cute) I know that I know some more, but thats all I can think of right now :)
    The website below has some great activites like making a cloud in a jar and making lightning.
    http://eo.ucar.edu/webweather/activities.html
     
  4. maroki

    maroki Comrade

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    Mar 4, 2007

    Our science unit on weather/wind also included a bubble activity, where the students each got a wand and got to blow bubbles outside. They had to blow them different ways (up, down, into the wind, away from the wind, etc.) and we had a class discussion afterwards.
     
  5. JenL

    JenL Comrade

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    Mar 4, 2007

    I did weather reporting...each student has a different day and they can pick whatever city they wanted and they had to report the weatehr to us from that city on their day....they were the meteorologists.
    they had to make a poster or something so we could see it as wel as hear it.
    it was fun!
     
  6. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Mar 4, 2007

    I am starting my weather unit this week too. One of the activities we will be doing is clouds. 1st we will sort different cloud pictures. Then we will go outside to see what kinds of clouds we see and then we will record our answers. The next day we will read It Looked like Spilt Milk afterwards the children will make their own cloud on dark blue paper with white paint.
     
  7. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Mar 4, 2007

    Make Fog-----Warm air can hold more moisture than cold. When warm air is cooled, the excess moisture condenses into fog, clouds, and finally rain, as the clouds become sufficiently heavy. Put some hot water into the quart jar (not so hot that you can se the vapor rising). Wet a rag with ice water and lay it over part of the mouth so that the rag falls partly into the jar. You can see the curls of fog close to the cloth, as it cools the moist, warm air in the jar.
    Rain and Clouds----hold the mouth of a quart jar over the spout of a boiling teakettle. The water vapor will rise into the jar and become visible as a cloud. Soon it will condense on the sides of the jar and finally drip out like drops of rain. ----Clouds, Put a bit of ivory soap in the microwave for a little bit and it puffs up to look like a cloud. Ivory soap is the only one that will work (all natural).
    Dew----Fill a small tin can with ice cubes. As the air close to the can becomes cold and gives up moisture, tiny drops of water will condense on the outside. In the same way, warm air above the earth cools during the night and deposits dew on the ground.
    Make Frost---When air containing moisture falls below freezing, frost is formed. Fill a small tin can with ice cubes. Add a big bunch of salt to make a colder mixture. Before long, frost will form on the outside of the can.
    Make a Rain Gauge---Use a glass jar or glass with straight sides and a flat bottom. Attach a ruler to the side to measure the amount of rainfall.
    Make a Barometer----Stretch the round part of a balloon as tightly as you can over the top of a glass jar, and hold it with rubber bands. Glue a pointer, straw, to the center of the balloon. You will need to trim the straw extending over the jar, if it pulls the balloon to much. Indicate the position of the pointer by making a mark on the wall. Make your barometer on a nice day. The pointer goes down when a storm is coming. A barometer tells you if the air pressure is high or low. If the air is calm and pleasant, the barometer is rising. If it’s unsettled and stormy, the barometer is falling. Each day, check the barometer to see if the straw is rising or falling from the point where it was the day before. If the air pressure outside the bottle is greater than the pressure inside the bottle, the balloon will drop slightly causing the straw pointer to move up, indicating rising air pressure. If the air pressure outside the bottle is less than the pressure inside the bottle,, the balloon will rise causing the straw to drop, indicating falling air pressure.
    Listen to “Thunderstorm” sounds CD. Than draw or write a descriptive paragraph of a weather scene, based on the sounds on the CD.
    “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” is such a fun book. The students love to pretend it can “rain” food.

    Make thunderstorm sounds…..
    http://www.grsites.com/sounds/nature001.shtml

    http://www.audiosparx.com/sa/displa...uesttimeout.480

    http://www.luxevivant.com/browsepro...e-Storm].HTML

    SCIENCE
    Cloud Flashcards
    Have your students make their own set of flashcards to study the clouds by using index cards and cotton balls. On one side, they can glue the cotton balls on in a way that describes that cloud by sight. On the other side, they can write their answer of what type of cloud it is called. They can also describe what the weather will be like on that kind of day that the cloud forms. For example, "stratus" clouds are gray and are the lowest in the sky. So your students my spread out the cotton ball and color over top of it with a gray crayon or marker. It should also be positioned on the lower half of the index card. On the backside of the card it would say its name plus that it means there might be a light rain. Do the same for "nimbostratus", "cirrus", and "cumulus" clouds. These will make excellent flashcards for your students to quiz each other in pairs.
    http://www.fastq.com/~jbpratt/education/theme/weather.html Lots and lots of darling weather projects at this site….
     
  8. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Mar 4, 2007

    Water cycle bracelet:
    Each child will need a piece of gimp or string or pipe cleaner and six beads-light blue for rain, green for grass, dark blue for a puddle, yellow for the sun, clear for evaporation and white for a cloud.
    Story: One day the rain started to come down from the sky. It landed on the grass. The raindrops made a puddle. The sun came out and warmed up the puddle. The droplets evaporated and went into the sky. so many raindrops got together that they make a cloud. Then the rain fell from the cloud. It landed on the grass. The children move the beads as the story is told.
    Water travels in a cycle, yes it does
    (use pointer finger to make a big circle)

    Water travels in a cycle, yes it does
    (repeat finger circle)

    It goes up as evaporation
    (move hands up to the sky)

    Forms clouds as condensation
    (make a cloud overhead with arms)

    Then comes down as precipitation, yes it does!
    (sprinkle with fingers while bringing arms down in front of you
     

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