"We Can't Return to Campus This Fall" - Great Article to Share, and Share.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Sarge, May 19, 2020 at 11:41 AM.

  1. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    May 19, 2020 at 11:41 AM

    Please share this article as it really points out what teachers will face, especially in high COVID-19 risk areas. The article is long, but people need to read it.

    The politicians think that social distancing in a school environment is as easy as “telling the kids to stay six feet apart.” Only a teacher knows firsthand how difficult, if not impossible that would be. Here a rather dystopian but true picture of what it would really look like if schools had to reopen in the fall while COVID-19 was still a threat.

    https://medium.com/@harley.litzelman/we-cannot-return-to-campus-this-fall-1ad91b8a65e0
     
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  3. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    May 19, 2020 at 12:45 PM

    Thank you so much for this article. Take just 3 of the 100 possible problems to deal with at a school. Changing classes, the lunchroom, and the playground. Unless all 3 are used rarely and sparingly, students will not be socially distanced apart. For Junior high and high schools what is going to be done to change how classes change from period to period successfully? How are they going to be socially distanced for all students coming and going down a hall way? Good luck with that one.
     
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  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    May 19, 2020 at 5:01 PM

    I can't even imagine the logistics of opening school. Some of our classes have 35 kids in them. And they're adult-sized, too.

    We already change classes at different times, but each change is within the same hallway, so it is still crowded.
     
  5. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    May 19, 2020 at 5:26 PM

    I think the biggest problem is the sheer number of rules and procedures that students will have to remember and follow. And what to do with the ones who don't?

    A good teacher spends the first few weeks of school reinforcing how to pass papers, sharpen your pencil, enter the room etc. We won't have that much time. If lives really are at stake, then students should be following all the social distancing protocols the moment they arrive on campus. But they won't even know what they are at that point. We will have to teach them (that's why they call us teacher) but the amount of time to teach them will be effectively zero.

    And if we do allow some sort of learning curve, then we have acknowledged that all the social distancing protocols were perhaps not too important. When I taught first grade, It would take me a few weeks to teach my students how to walk in line. I was good with that because if one of my kiddos had a hard time learning that particular skill, his grandmother at home wasn't going to catch a life threatening illness.

    Do we suspend students for not wearing masks, not social distancing? If we don't, then I guess it's just not that important. The same for a lot of other behaviors. The hardest rules to enforce are the ones where children have to avoid something they are allowed to do in other environments. Kids can run, just not in the halls. They can yell, even scream, in their own backyard, but not in the classroom. They can walk around the house all they want to, but they can't in the classroom. Now we want to give them a long list of EVEN MORE things that are not "bad behavior" but they will now get in trouble for.
     
  6. whizkid

    whizkid Devotee

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    May 19, 2020 at 5:28 PM

    Staggered schedules is your best shot to open schools and even that is a long shot without a vaccine.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 19, 2020 at 10:09 PM

    I feel like staggered schedules would require twice as many teachers, and many places are already woefully short on those.
     
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  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    May 19, 2020 at 10:27 PM

    That is one possibility. Another would be to have a class from 8-11:15 and another 11:30-2:45 like they use to do in half day Kindergarten. The teacher remains to teach both classes. At home students would have some distance learning/homework. Unlike what we went through the past 2 months, the students would have to face the teacher if they didn't do the work. Just a rough estimate...and yes, maybe a problem for the parents with work. If not, social distancing will be impossible with the high class sizes and small classrooms that are in most states.
     
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  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 19, 2020 at 10:41 PM

    I can see this being presented as an option. My question would be am I responsible for teaching both sections of in-person instruction as well as both sections of online instruction? Surely there would be additional prep time necessary for creating assignments, giving feedback, and grading online activities—beyond the prep time necessary for doing all that for in-person classes as well. When would I have time to do all the online stuff if I’m in face-to-face classes all day with nothing more than 15 minutes for lunch?
     
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  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 19, 2020 at 10:43 PM

    And while I know that school isn’t childcare, I do think it would create a huge hardship for families for schools to continue any form of online, at-home learning during typical school hours. I have a six year old who obviously can’t stay home alone, but both my hoosband and I are teachers. I don’t know what we would do if our kid had to work from home and we couldn’t.
     
  11. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    May 19, 2020 at 10:59 PM

    That is exactly the dilemma I don't know how to solve. If you have staggered schedules, I agree it would be a burden on parents. If you don't have staggered schedules, the teachers have overcrowded classrooms. What to do?
     
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  12. Mr.history

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    May 19, 2020 at 11:07 PM

    I live in GA, one of the earliest states to open up. I honestly feel like we are going to open back up like this didn't happen. I hope I'm wrong but I just don't see parents going to work like normal and not expecting their kids to be at school like normal too. I'm sure things like field trips and other extracurriculars will be limited or canceled but I just don't see how we can have all these pushes to open up but limit schools to lower amounts of time. I hope they do figure something out because my classroom is small and I typically have like 30-35 8th graders sitting right on top of each other with about a 3 ft walkway in the front of the room for me to teach from. If this does spread again, I don't see how it doesn't go through schools like wildfire. All I keep hearing politicians talk about is how kids aren't as effected but what about the teachers, bus drivers, lunch room staff, ect. There are quite a lot of teachers in my school who fall into that vulnerable category or have family living with them who does.
     
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  13. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    May 19, 2020 at 11:27 PM

    Some great points. When this started in March, I remember Italy pleading to the US to not make their same mistakes. The mistake they said they made was letting their children (especially teens) run free. Then, they brought COVID-19 back home infecting family members. The kids getting infected in Italy ended up killing many family members.
     
  14. whizkid

    whizkid Devotee

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:02 AM

    And if no staggered schedules, what else is there besides distance learning? If the parents are tired of the kids being home, and you want to safely open schools and have safe operations without overcrowding, then you literally have to pick your poison. Staggered schedules or continued full time distance learning?
     
  15. whizkid

    whizkid Devotee

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:06 AM

    So kids get bussed to school, taken home, then the next group gets bussed to school and then taken home on the same day?
     
  16. whizkid

    whizkid Devotee

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:11 AM

    Every teacher I've talked to doesn't think school buildings will be opened in the fall.
     
  17. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Companion

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    May 20, 2020 at 5:03 AM

    Our district said social distancing on a bus allows for 13 students. I have no idea how transportation would be able to accommodate that.
     
  18. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    May 20, 2020 at 5:57 AM

    If you do the half day schedule, you'd have to disinfect everything (including buses) in between. Those logistics would be rough.

    My son goes to a huge high school. Today they dropped off books and picked up any personal belongings. They only allowed 10 students in the entire building at a time. Not sure how we move from that to "regular" school attendance in just a few months.

    And Sarge, you make a great point about needing time to teach them the rules and expectations. I teach K. I know exactly what you mean.
     
  19. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 20, 2020 at 7:27 AM

    My district is creating three plans for August and will decide which to go with when the time is near.

    option 1) continue full time distance learning
    option 2) full time in school learning with social distancing in place
    option 3) hybrid with some at-school learning and some at-home learning

    In the case of option 3, one structure being considered is half of the students all day M/W and the other half all day Tu/Th. Students would do online distance learning on the days that they don't attend school. Teachers would have Friday as a planning day to prepare and grade all of the online learning.
     
  20. MissCeliaB

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    May 20, 2020 at 7:52 AM

    I like this model. I've also seem a similar one where Fridays are available for students with accommodations (Sped, 504, ESL) required by law to have the option to attend to get their minutes. Also in this model, students in self-contained rooms would attend all 5 days.
     
  21. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    May 20, 2020 at 8:29 AM

    We had the announcement yesterday that we will not be returning to the building this year; remote learning will continue until the end of June. Part of that same announcement was that parents would know before the end of June what September will look like. I can't see how that can happen, unless the decision is that we won't be returning to the buildings in September.
     
  22. Secondary Teach

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    May 20, 2020 at 11:30 AM

    I believe temperature checks will be apart of the norm as students go back, in addition to social distancing/limiting the number of students allowed in the building. Depending on either how high/low the number of parents willing to send their children back to school, many districts may opt for strictly online learning for the upcoming year to reduce operating/additonal faculty/staff costs and Covid19 liability. Some districts may decide to open using a hybrid model and then switch later during the year to online learning if many parents just aren't sending their children to school. It's just a matter of wait and see. The biggest change I may see happening(from what I'm reading online) is that many of the vulnerable teachers(aged 60+) may or may not be able to teach in-person. Their position may be shifted to instruct remotely.
     
  23. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    May 20, 2020 at 1:05 PM

    This a great article. I love how it accurately described what a highschool or hogh school class looks lie and how highschoolers act, and a very good view of what it would be ike with the masks and 6 ft. apart.
    People always say that this can't be done in elementary, and I agree. In elementary those young kids will probably just not understand or forget but middle school and high school brings defiance and not caring. There will be many kids who will just want to act cool and push the boundaries, so this is a no at any age school.
    If they are closing colleges and community colleges where adults are attending, and you would think they would abide by the rules, but not close schools with younger population? That makes no sense.
     
  24. CaliforniaRPCV

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    May 20, 2020 at 4:33 PM

    Online classes in the colleges and community colleges are much more effective for the adults attending than they are for younger students below high school. With adults closing on-campus classes has a much higher reward in reduced risk without a big impact on delivery. That is if the instructors can adjust.
     
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  25. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    May 20, 2020 at 5:27 PM

    The thing with HS and MS is that they share everything - bags chips, fries, phones, earbuds ... EARBUDS for cryin' out loud. A lot of kids that age will have a mindset like "I can hug and share with my friends because my friends don't have coronavirus."

    Another good point the article brings up is the social-emotional effect of all these new rules. That kid who has trouble remembering to stay six feet away and keeps losing his mask is going to reach a serious frustration point when he is continually disciplined for things that were perfectly normal for him 6 months ago. I guarantee you that incidents of teachers having to clear the room because of students having chair-throwing meltdowns is going to go way up.
     
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