Warm and Cool colors

Discussion in 'Art Teachers' started by bonteach, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. bonteach

    bonteach Companion

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    Aug 25, 2009

    I was planning on doing a lesson on warm and cool colors for the first day of school. I have kind of a half-baked idea in my head and I was hoping for some suggestions. My goal is to have the students have a deeper understanding of color than the color wheel (which they usually did on the first day with the previous art teacher.) I was thinking of using paint samples...
    Any suggestions welcome
    :):thanks:
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Aug 25, 2009

    What grade is this for? I have no idea about these things but the only thing that phrase brings up in my mind is in relation to picking the right colors for our skin tone. LOL.

    Depending on the age, I guess you could also do this in relation to painting a house. What feelings does each provoke? You could do a picture slideshow and have them go from there. Younger kids probably could care less about house painting though.

    I'm brainstorming in an area I have no experience in but mainly I'm just trying to suggest that maybe you find a real world connection that applies to their age bracket.
     
  4. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Aug 25, 2009

    Place holder while I think on this. I'll get back to you if I come up with something.
     
  5. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Aug 25, 2009

    If you have artworks that are mostly done in a warm or cool color scheme and you say you have paint samples, you could make a "game" out of matching the color sample to the artwork with the appropriate color scheme.

    You could make the discussion of the color scheme kinesthetic by having them group themselves into a cool or warm area of the room when they are looking at your samples or artworks with cool and warm color schemes. That could be chaos but with younger groups moving is always a plus.

    You could play "Which color does not belong" in a certain color scheme.

    It's early for Fall but you could have them draw/ trace leaf patterns then color them with a cool or warm color scheme. It doesn't have to be leaves. It could be African savannas and lions or Arctic ice floes with penguins.

    Okay, I'm tapped for now.
     
  6. Samothrace

    Samothrace Cohort

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    Aug 25, 2009

    yeah I need an age group to know where my head should be thinking! And I don't dive into that kind of thinking for awhile b/c I spend most of the first class hashing out rules and names and doing a mini kind of project..and most of the time my sced. changes sometime in september to deal with the very transient district I work in!
     
  7. bonteach

    bonteach Companion

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    Aug 25, 2009

    Thanks for the thoughts. I was thinking of doing this with 3rd or 4th graders. I am open to all brain storms!!
    Thanks
     
  8. ABall

    ABall Fanatic

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    Aug 26, 2009

    NOTE: I am not an art teacher so take this with a grain of salt:

    set out two bins of mediums (crayons, paint, markers etc...) one with warm hues of yellows, orange reds, pinks and another one with the blue hues........... have them draw pictures only using warm colors or cool colors........ and display on seperate sides of the room.........have them think of warm things to draw (fire place, hot chcoloate, sun etc.. and have them think of cool thngs like snowflakes, ice cubes, ice fishing etc..)
     
  9. bonteach

    bonteach Companion

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    Aug 30, 2009

    Thanks!
     
  10. Teechietech

    Teechietech Rookie

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    Sep 1, 2009

    You could show them the "simultaneous contrast effect" in which colors look different depending on what background they are placed against. So for example, if you take a gray square and place it against a red background, it looks slightly more greenish than if the same gray square is viewed against a blue background. Anyway, it provides an excuse to have them cut up little squares of construction paper! :) You can look up more about why this effect happens if you google simultaneous contrast effect. Good luck!

    TT
     

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