Want to teach high school

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by TBoonePickens, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. TBoonePickens

    TBoonePickens New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 2, 2010

    Hey, all. I'm new here and in need of advice. I'm finishing my MA in Sociology this spring, but I want to teach high school social studies/history. I'm wondering whether I should go into a licensure program or go into a MA/licensure program in History. Any thoughts?
     
  2.  
  3. fratermus

    fratermus Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2008
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 3, 2010

    Depending on the region, you may have to minor in Football to get a job.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,714

    Nov 3, 2010

    I think you asked this same question a few days ago.
     
  5. TBoonePickens

    TBoonePickens New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 3, 2010

    Indeed I did, but in the wrong section. Though I appreciate the comments, I'm trying to get an answer to my question; not about the job market, but about the process involved in becoming a teacher.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,714

    Nov 3, 2010

    I think you have to consider the job market when making your decision about a track or program.
     
  7. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 3, 2010

    It also depends upon your states licensure requirements. My state at this point you would only be qualified to teach soc and have to take a praxis in which soc only make up about 8% of the test. Your best bet is to speak with your local university education dept.
     
  8. porque_pig

    porque_pig Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 6, 2010

    To be honest, it's difficult to explain the benefits/drawbacks of each licensure route without discussing the job market and the state in which you want to teach. Each state has its own requirements, and requirements can vary dramatically across the country. In some states, your sociology degree would be more than sufficient if you manage to fulfill the other licensure requirements. Also, it would be less of a financial risk to pursue the licensure alone, especially given the super-saturated high school history teacher market. In other states, you would be required to jump through lots of hoops and complete more requirements. I think we all need a little information to help you. Where will you be looking to get hired?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Silke
Total: 154 (members: 2, guests: 133, robots: 19)
test