Vocabulary...aaahh

Discussion in 'High School' started by inlovewithwords, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. inlovewithwords

    inlovewithwords Companion

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    Jul 17, 2007

    How do I tackle vocabulary. I'm teaching 9th grade english. My school has no requirements or guidelines for vocabulary however I feel it is essentially important. I have read many books on how to teach vocabulary and I now understand how to choose authentic words. However, I'm debating whether I should do a word of the day as the bellringer activity or to simply give the students the new list of 8 words for the week at the beginning of the week?
    Also, how should I assess what they learned? I was thinking to give them a vocabulary quiz every 2 weeks which gives them 16 words. Each day I would have an activity for them to do with the words for the bellringer. Should I assign vocab homework? HELP

    What do your vocabulary quizzes look like? multiple choice....complete the sentence?
     
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  3. koocat008

    koocat008 Companion

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    Jul 18, 2007

    I have 8th grade language arts. I am in your boat, basically I have to make up my own Vocabulary system. My first year last year, I ended up looking online for spelling word units (google "vocabulary lists") or something to give you an idea of how to structure your biweekly vocab units. Every week, I would have them do word pyramids, window panes, or sentences, or make a quick fun word search or crossword. After journals, they would write down ten words in their assignment notebooks (the words I wrote on index cards and hung on the front board). Then I would tell them the work. They had a whole week, due friday. Quiz friday after they handed in work (I say word aloud, put in sentence for them). It was basically an oral mini quiz.

    I also have this thing called "Think Tank" with words that are common among adults. Once in a great while (twice a week), I choose a different kid to pick a colored index card from think tank. They have to pronounce it, look it up in dictionary. Then everyone has till friday to somehow put it in a meaningful sentence during class discussion in order to win a paw (our school prize system). It is fun, and kids actually like it.
     
  4. mrs.sparker

    mrs.sparker Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2007

    There are several vocabulary word books that are considered "SAT prep words" but really are words all kids should know. They have cartoons with them so I plan on giving the kids the word and the cartoon and a sentence using the word. and have them write down what they think it means, and then what it really means. Helps with using context clues.
     
  5. alto1jr

    alto1jr Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2007




    What exactly are these window panes or word pyramids?
     
  6. nsatterfield

    nsatterfield Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2007

    I only teach vocabulary that goes along with the stories we are reading or from novels, but I don’t just teach vocabulary for the sake of teaching vocabulary. I prefer to teach stems. Instead of learning a few random vocabulary words, with the knowledge of stems, they have learned the meaning of literally thousands of words!
     
  7. kyblue07

    kyblue07 Companion

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Good point nsatterfield! I didn't have any vocabulary guidelines either, but in my state standards there were expectations for understanding word parts, etc. On our curriculum map I put these standards on the ongoing page because vocabulary needs to be addressed continually such as through weekly (or whatever time frame) vocabulary study and then quizzes. Lists of words could be grouped according to base word, prefix, suffix etc.
    The latest 'consensus' that I've seen/read on effective vocabulary development focused on using non-contextual as well as contextual study. So the students could be presented with a small set of words featured in their reading that have a common feature (root word, prefix, etc) but then students could also explore other words that fit into that category from outside their reading to add to their word list. Just my take on contextual vs non-contextual.
    Hope this helps in some way. Sorry if I rambled : )
     
  8. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Jul 20, 2007

    I had a high group of 6th graders and since I love vocabulary, I made them do a lot. The best activities came from a "word of the day" that I got every day by e-mail. I don't remember who sent it (I discontinued it because I'm not teaching language arts this year) but it featured a word, definition, use in a sentence, a multiple choice question, and full origin. I would give them extra credit if they used that word in their writing sometime throughout the week.
     
  9. nilavx

    nilavx New Member

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    Aug 1, 2007

    dictionary.com does send out word of the day and it has all the components you listed except a multiple choice question.
     
  10. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Aug 1, 2007

    My students loved the question! I found the site from merriam webster wordcentral.com and click on "daily buzzword"
     
  11. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

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    Aug 1, 2007

    :hijack:
    Thanks! I think I might give it a try. I hope you don't mind--I was taught to CASE--copy and steal everything!:lol:
     
  12. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Aug 1, 2007

    Window Panes is a strategy for remembering vocabulary words, but it can also be used to help organize steps in a process or help students remember important concepts.

    Here are the basic rules:
    1. A window pane should have no more than nine cells. (If you need ten cells, then make two five-cell posters).
    2. Each cell should contain a simple picture/icon and only one word.
    3. The pane should involve lots of color.

    It's a strategy taught in SIOP training (Sheltered Instruction).

    There's also the Frayer Model which requires students to define words that will help them better understand concepts.

    Here are the rules:
    1. Students draw a box.
    2. The concept or term is written in the center of the box.
    3. The definition of the word is written in the top left-hand box.
    4. The characteristics of the term are listed in the top right-hand box.
    5. Examples from the students own experiences or from real-life are placed in the lower left-hand box.
    6. Non-examples are placed in the lower right-hand box.

    The Verbal-Visual Word Association strategy is similar to the Frayer model:
    1. Divide a sheet of paper or a note card into four sections.
    2. Write the vocabulary word to be learned in the top left-hand corner and its definition in the bottom left-hand corner.
    3. Draw a picture in the top right hand corner that enables the students to make a personal connection.
    4. In the bottom right-hand corner, have the students provide a non-example OR have them provide a sentence using the word.

    Those are the basic strategies that my district expects us to use. :)
     
  13. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

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    Aug 1, 2007


    These are similar to the "vocabulary blocks" I use in my room. The word is in the center and there are blocks for a. etymology and part of speech b. icon c. definition d. antonym/synonym e. sentence

    The kids seem to enjoy the icon and sentence the best. We usually try to make our sentences apply to our class/students; they can be very creative at times! Of course, the icon helps them to create their own mental picture to remember the word. I run off zillions of these graphic organizers (hole-punched) and they have to keep them in their binders. I try to find different ways to assess them-quizzes, word searches, cross-words, etc.
     
  14. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Aug 2, 2007

    When I taught English we used Wordly Wise, I gave them a quiz at the end of each three lessons (45 words). The test was fill-in, multiple choice, and write your own sentence. Keep in mind that this was an honors class. I also gave vocabulary quizzes on words from our readings in novels and short stories.
     

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