Visual Literacy

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mrsammieb, Jun 16, 2018.

  1. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Jun 16, 2018

    I am currently getting my specialist degree in media technology and I am currently taking a class on Visual and Media Literacy. In 1971, psychologist determined that students retain more information if they are given information using visuals and are allowed to view visuals for learning. Of course more and more has been learned and developed from this idea, however schools have not really changed. Why do you think that is? Don't you think in our day and time, we should be offering visual literacy classes so we can help people determine what is a push by marketing? Are we just far behind? Or is it that I am far behind?
     
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  3. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jun 16, 2018

    A quick internet search will reveal that we are definitely FAR BEHIND - unfortunately, most people seem to have no idea that we're lagging behind other technologically-developed countries. As a student of visual and media literacy, I thought you might be interested in a couple of my favorite references on multimedia instruction. I was surprised to discover that most of the scholarly principles and theories discussed by these researchers were already an integral part of my multimedia lessons!

    Multimedia Learning by Dr. Richard Mayer, educational psychologist at UCSB
    • Click here to view ebook
    • Click here for downloadable pdf of book
    Clear and to the Point by Dr. Stephen Kosslyn , former professor emeritus of psych at Harvard
    • Click here for downloadable pdf of book
    If you would like to see how multimedia/cognitive concepts such as temporal continuity, coherence, modality, personalization and interactivity effects can be integrated into highly-structured lessons designed for literacy intervention, click here. I would be especially interested in receiving constructive feedback from you or anyone in your graduate degree program. Disclaimer: The website is strictly for educational purposes - hey, I'm RETIRED!

    Caveat: Be forewarned that this approach was developed specifically to help a growing segment of our elementary school population that has not responded to conventional methods and goes against popular beliefs about literacy intervention. It's outside the box which is probably why it works!
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2018
  4. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

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    Jun 17, 2018

    I use tons of visuals. However, I think there is an idea that visuals lead to students watching movies. I have had to fight my administration to allow my students in my DE classes to watch documentaries--we read about particular issues, and then watch a documentary--we talk about bias, image choice, word choice, organization--just like we do with reading. Visuals are so powerful--and generally students remember those far more than the readings--but if you pair the two--the effect is even better.
     
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  5. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Jun 17, 2018

    Visuals are incredibly powerful and they do really help the teaching process. I think classrooms have added more visuals, but not always in the best way. Videos are visual, but they are often very passive. They can be helpful, but often there are better ways to use visuals.

    The best ways are ways I have learned from classes I have taken, seeing other teachers use them, and books that I have read. In the short term, visuals require work and thought on the teacher's part. It also requires work and thought on the students part. Teachers need to learn to use these techniques and implement them from quality PD classes (hard to find sometimes), good books, and teachers who use this in their classrooms.
     
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  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 20, 2018

    Slightly different, but maybe useful: the game Set. It is a game of visual perception and involves higher level thinking skills. I once taught a one-semester class entirely playing this game. It taps into skills that are sometimes ignored. One student of mine said she dreamed of the game at night! You can buy the set of cards or play a daily game online at www.setgame.com .
     
  7. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jun 21, 2018

    Our profession is way, way behind. I'm reminded of it every time I'm sent to any PD. The teacher-presenters there tend to be awful at visual communication. Our idea of Powerpoint seems to be 5 bullet points and a pixelated piece of clipart with the water mark still attached. I'm frankly appalled by the presentations I see for sale on TPT.

    Compare what we are delivering to any keynote given by Apple, Google, etc. and you'll see the gap. I highly recommend reading The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs as it does a fantastic job of not only explaining how to communicate visually but why it works.
     
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  8. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jun 21, 2018

    You're right! PowerPoints have gotten a bad rap because most presenters seem to have no idea of the program's full multimedia potential. Most PD workshops I attended included useless handouts of the PPT presenter notes - such a waste of paper and an outstanding presentation program.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2018

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