Virtual Education?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Teachling, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    3

    Mar 19, 2008

  2.  
  3. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 19, 2008

    I don't think so. Too many people have to work, and most jobs can't be done at home. Plus, there are a lot of children who wouldn't thrive in that environment. I think there is a niche for it, but I doubt it would become universal.
     
  4. kburen

    kburen Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2005
    Messages:
    584
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 19, 2008

    I can't pull up the link to read, but I can give my 2 cents from experience. When I was in High School I participated in a program that was just getting started called Virtual High School. I loved it. I took one period each day (or odd or even day depending on the period) and sat at a computer wherever they put me that year (one year was in the clinic and one year was in the library) and did my work online though the Virtual High School website. I also was asked (since I was the only one who did it my first year from my school and even county) to go talk about it to a panel of people who were looking at making it available to all of the schools. It just depends on the students. I like that it was offered to me and that I got to choose whatever classes I wanted from the list. However, I'm not sure I can see doing all classes that way...it also depends on the age.
     
  5. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 19, 2008

    I have a student this year who was in our district's cyber-school for 2.5 to 3 years. I must say, when he came to 9th grade, it was a rough transition. He was socially awkward, and academically behind (guess who did the work? or, at least, helped a lot?). As kburen said, it definitely depends on the student.

    As far as graduate work, I am currently completing an online graduate certificate, and may earn a second one (before embarking on a complete Masters program), and I find the courses stimulating. Of course, I know how to read and research, and can carry on meaningful conversations through the use of message boards. I think high-school level on-line classes can be very difficult for younger students (perhaps seniors, but I would question the efficiency of students in any other grade--except maybe juniors in honors programs). Of course, discussion in real-time and groupwork is also important.
     
  6. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    3

    Mar 20, 2008

    This kind of program may be helpful for students who are homeschool or at risk. With today's lanscape in the economy & both parents having to work particular those who work from home, this may be an option. Also for those parents who do not support public school system for reasons such as school violence but can't afford private education.

    There's an article out that indicates that college applicants are projected to decline over the next decade. Having a program such as this one may help or at least encourage students who may not see going to college as an option. One advantage of taking course online is the flexibility it offers for time mangement. Granted there are also pitfulls such as being self-discipline to do the work & the lack of a social environment that is part of the learning & develoment process.

    The thing is that at least there's another option to encourage learning. I know when I was in my last two years of high school I had to work & it was not easy juggling the two. Someone in a situation similar to the one I experienced could benefit from this type of program. :2cents:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dy.../03/09/AR2008030902065.html?nav=rss_education
     
  7. old-new teacher

    old-new teacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 20, 2008

    We have a virtual school program here in Wyoming as well. I think it was developed to help those who homeschool to have an adequate curriculum to keep up with the standards of their peers. I haven't taught any kids who have been in the program, so I don't know how valid it is.

    Someone mentioned before they had a student who had been enrolled in one before they got them and was socially awkward and behind academically with the assumption his parents had done a lot of the work for him. This is not a situation that is unique to virtual schooling, but I see it with a handful of home schooled children as well. Some homeschooling parents do a great job of socializing their kids through intramural sports programs, toastmasters, group musical instruction, church youth groups etc. Those kids all come into our school ready to make friends and work well with others. Other parents isolate their kids because they are so afraid of the real world that their kids in essence become socially inept. The same goes with the teaching. Some parents choose excellent curriculum and set up a structured environment and schedule for their school work. Others choose randomly and don't teach it well, not to mention fail to set up a true structure to their day leading their kids to struggle in a structured environment...what will those kids do when they reach adulthood and must integrate into the workforce?

    Sorry...a long rambling rant, but just wanted to make the point, it is not necessarily the "virtual school" concept that is the problem, but the individual parents and the choices they make in the homeschool environment.
     
  8. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    3

    Mar 20, 2008

    Excellent point. Like most things, it's about commitment & support.
     
  9. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Messages:
    6,809
    Likes Received:
    190

    Mar 20, 2008

    It will be interesting to see this. I think there may be more of this type of stuff, especially with the larger & larger class sizes. I think a lot of parents would like to see the more individualized attention to their child.

    I guess I'm wondering would these "virtual" students also be mandated to take the state tests like the rest of the school district. It just seems are schools are so teach the to the test oriented anymore!!!
     
  10. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,237
    Likes Received:
    9

    Mar 22, 2008

    I think this should depend on the students and the support that they get. You need a certain level of maturity and self-reliance to take online classes. I know a bunch of kids who would blow their classes off until the last minute. Heck, when I was in school I might have blown off my classes until the last minute. I think some people need that day to day interactions to do well in school. And of course if mommy is going to hover over the computer and correct all problems the kid gets wrong, the student will be in trouble.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 159 (members: 1, guests: 138, robots: 20)
test