Violence Video games CHILDREN

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by JaimeMarie, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    My sister is taking a human development class. She has to interview a teacher. She choose me. I gave my answer but now I want to know what you all think. Does violence from video games cause children to be violent? What about violence in the media as a whole (tv, movies, news....)?
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Jaime,

    There was just a thread on this very topic.. It was quite heated... I 'll try to find it.
     
  4. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    I thought that thread was on not being able to adapt to society.
    And how it affects their school work. Not on violence.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I think that media creates more visible images of poor role modeling these days than kids might have otherwise been exposed to before media was widespread. It is hard to turn on the T.V. without being exposed to adult type themes (not just talking sexuality here). Because we seem so acclimated to it and it is socially acceptable, we forget kids aren't as able to distinguish between what's really socially acceptable and what's not. I think it does have an impact. Can the media and gaming have a positive impact? Sure it can. The problem is we grew up with so much of it that training ourselves to shy from unacceptable mediums even for the sake of our kids is a struggle that many people don't attempt to overcome. Even more importantly, it is so pervasive that we can't shield them 100% anyways, if we are living in and among society. There are other effects on our changing population. Media/gaming industries are widely attacked for it's often harmful influence on today's kids and society as a whole, but it isn't the only peice of the puzzle.
     
  6. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Thanks Cut.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I don't think that all the violence in society can be linked to video games... that's too easy. Think of all the incredibly violent people who have dominated history long before video games, from Hitler to Idi Amin--none of that can be blamed on video games.

    That said, I think that the pervasiveness of violence makes kids a bit immune to violence. They're surrounded it, from their TV shows to their video games to the movies they watch. I'm not sure they connect those deaths suffered by Super Mario with the real thing-- something that hurts more than the arm they may have broken when they fell from their bikes or the shot the doctor gave them the last time they got a vaccine.

    Should they be exposed to less violence?? ABsolutely. It does no good and probably does some harm. But do place the blame soley on the video games? No. At least for the real young kids, I place a lot of it on the parents who allow their kids unlimited exposure to all that violence.
     
  8. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    I know there have been many studies since, but doesn't this all stem from the Bandura experiments.

    I must say that if you never let your kid play a video game, never let them watch the t.v. they would still act violently. The question is would they act more violently. Cowboys used to Kill Indians... No one complained. Now our children kill ho's to get their money back from the hooker that they just used to fill up thier health bar. A problem....Maybe. But as far as the violence well I think that kids in the past just as violent, just not as perverse in thier violence. That said, I don't think that you can say that because a child plays certain games, or watches certain movies, that they will act a certain way. I think that the groups around which a child is most often are far more strong in the child's socialization.
     
  9. AngelHead

    AngelHead Comrade

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    Looney tunes are pretty violent too. So are games like war and cowboys and indians. Children have always "play fought" they just do it electronically now. That's just my opinion.
     
  10. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Those are good points. I think they can be more of a problem in the area of addiction thus limiting well rounded creativitiy.
     
  11. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Being the mom of 2 boys who like to play video games I can say that it does scare me that there is such a wide variety of those types of games out there. My oldest son (almost 12) wants to buy the violent games but is not allowed to (by us) because he is not 17 (which is what the box says). We try and defer him from buying those and to be honest, he plays the sports games more often anyway. He is a mature boy for his age and can handle games such as those and knows that it is just that...a game. He knows that it's not something that goes beyond the video game. That being said, I believe that someone else said something about "cowboys and indians" and "cops and robbers." How many of us played that as kids? Just about everyone. We all turned out okay.

    I know that parents like to blame the media but really it's about what goes on at home. You teach your kids right from wrong when they are little and guide them along the way, helping them and teaching them. We talk to them about what is real and what is fantasy and why that is so. We can't shelter them forever. I'm not sure I would want to. Isn't it true that if you CAN'T have something that just makes you want it more?? I say limit the amount of time playing games and try to enrich their lives with other things. My boys both have the Game Boy and PSP but I would say that they only ask to play it every other weekend...maybe. (They are only allowed to play on weekends. School days...don't even ask. :D )
     
  12. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    When I talk about media's impact, I don't necessarily think of gaming. I think of t.v. It's gotten way more perversive than a game of cops and robbers and is infused with more sexuality than I know I grew up with.
     
  13. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    I have 2 sons (13 and 16 on Sat.) who really enjoy video games. the 13 year old is especially addicted but is also a really sensitive boy who loves his family and his pets and wouldn't hurt a flea. His love of war-related games inspired requests for non-fiction WWII books for Christmas. I may be naive, but I don't worry that the violence in those games are affecting him negatively. i was more worried that the skater games he played when he was younger and getting into skateboarding would affect him since they seemed to send the message that damaging people's property was OK. Our family is strong and i think that's bigger and stronger than the message of the games. Talk to me in 10 years....
     
  14. Tigers

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    When we combine these two, doesn't your line of logic imply that your son will only want the M rated games more?
     
  15. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    The games have the age-inappropriate level of sexuality also.

    So, if we understand that there is a problem, what are we to do?

    The first and most effective method of dealing with this problem is communication. That means teacher's and parents need first understand the games, shows, magazines, websites, etc. to which our children have access or will soon have access. The next step would be dialogue. Family is the most influential factor in children's lives. I know this diminishes as the child ages, but don't be mistaken, even in adolescence Family is the strongest influence (Just not by much). The truth is that some of these issues are human nature, some are infused in our culture, and some are products of the era in which we live. So, these issues are inevitably going to arise...without television, without video games, and without the rest.
     
  16. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    This theory is expressed by many parents, since most children can differentiate reality vs. game. Because of these parents, I often think people feel that someone is saying "if your child plays video games, he will go kill bullies." This is, of course, untrue. But, as children watch gruesome slaughters, graphic sex scenes and the like they do become desensitized to these issues. Often parents haven't outlined their beliefs on these issues (well free from contradictions, anyway). So, children are left to make thier own decisions.

    Because of the internet, the average age that a child will view pornography is 10.

    Many parents can get programs that block out sites, and give the control to them. And, this would be wonderful if it wasn't for two things: Children are smart, too smart; and home isn't the only place where the kids get exposure to these issues.
     
  17. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Even if they can differentiate between reality and games, our attitudes and perceptions are shaped by what we are more often exposed to. For example, if you hear negative talk at home more often than positive talk, you will start thinking that way too.
     
  18. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    As stated above, family is the strongest influence and with strong family values, kids should be able to differentiate between right and wrong. Certain games/things are not all that good for kids to play/see but as also stated above, they are exposed to them in a variety of ways.

    As for my "logic", yes that would imply that my son does want to play with the M rated games. In fact, I believe that I stated that in my post. However, one of us has to be the adult/parent and set some boundaries. I know they are not appropriate for him to play therefore, I say no. (Obviously the industry says that as well or they wouldn't put an age limit on them.) However, just because I put a limit on them doesn't mean that he is going to go out and rob a store just to get the games. Yes, he wants to play them still but mom says no and he deals with it. I'm sure that at some point in our lives, our parents told us no for something. Did we still want it? Yes. Did we want it even after they told us no? Of course. But, you deal with it and move on. Not every kid is the same and some may do it anyway (play the game) but I know my son is responsible enough to ask first. There are others who wouldn't. It all goes back to what cutNglue said: it starts at home.
     
  19. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    I'm truly sorry that I participated in this discussion but I'll weigh in one more time because I feel that many of the statements being made, while possibly based on research, are totally perpetuating generalities. My kids can distinguish between reality (home and family life, Christian values) and fantasy world. Most kids can! What child really believed that Charlotte the spider could talk to her animal friends in the barn, or that a cat wearing a striped hat would show up on a rainy day! Of course there are the rare children who have problems and would be negatively influenced by video games - but they could also be influenced by something else. My children learned a lot more about inappropriate behavior from classmates than from the video games. We have had endless discussions about the kinds of behaviors they were exposed to at school and the impact at home if they put any of the language or behavior into practice themselves. It's all a part of parenting! Children are exposed to all kinds of things! Some you can control and some you can't - but they are all learning experiences. Go ahead and form opinions about video games and their impact - but leave my kids out of your sweeping generalizations.
     
  20. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    I second your opinion, maryhf!
     
  21. Tigers

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    I think most people here agree that children know the difference of reality and a game. The generalizations that are being made are that exposure desensitizes and we need to start at home to make a difference in the lives of our children.

    You are talking and communicating with your children and that is wonderful, but a lot of us care about all of the other children also; these other children often do not have someone to discuss the issues with besides peer groups. For those children video games do need to be discussed. I am sorry if you feel that your parenting or your children were being attacked.
     
  22. Tigers

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    My point was that you used the line telling a child they can't do something will only make them want it more in defense of using video games in moderation. So, ascribing to that line of logic would imply that moderation in M games is okay also.

    I wasn't agreeing or disagreeing with your point of view, I was just curious if your logic was consistent in these two cases. I meant no offense.
     
  23. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Mary, Teachingmomof4, Alice, Cut, Angel, and MissFrizz thank you so much for your opinions. My sister greatly appreciates them.
    Her paper is due tomorrow night. Now she gets to take all these opinions and put them into her paper some how. I bet she is going to have so much fun. :D (I'm so glad I'm not in college any more).
     
  24. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    ouch...
     
  25. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Mar 12, 2007

    OOPS! THANK YOU TIGERS!
     

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