Vindictive School Board

Discussion in 'General Education' started by deserttrumpet, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Dec 18, 2008

    One of our teachers is leaving at semester. He has found a job elsewhere that is not teaching that will pay at least twice the salary that he is currently earning (and had applied for the job last April). Although it would be nice for him to finish the year it is not going to happen. The school board considered his resignation last night and has decided to take action and revoke his teaching certificate for breaking contract. Considering the fact that he will not need a teaching certificate for his new position I feel that this action is vindictive and petty.

    I find it sad that a teacher who has served the district well and is leaving things in a better shape than when he arrived would be treated like this at the end. :(
     
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  3. ~mrs.m~

    ~mrs.m~ Comrade

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    That does seem very low of them, I agree.
     
  4. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    That is too bad. Maybe they think they have to set an example so other teachers will not follow suit? I guess if it isn't going to affect him, he doesn't have to worry about it, but still, it does seem petty. At least he didn't leave mid-semester.

    I don't know how it works in Arizona, but I think in Nebraska the school board can just make a recommendation to the state board of ed, who ultimately makes the final decision on revocation. There is a web site that you can look up to see what has happened to teachers somewhere. Most of the time, the state board of ed gives those who broke contract a reprimand, or maybe a temporary suspension. The permanent revocation comes for serious crimes/actions.
     
  5. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    It's not the state board of ed, I was wrong...it's called the Nebraska Professional Practices Commission. Here's their website if you're interested, not that it would do anyone outside of Nebraska any good...except for it's kind of fun to look at what the naughties did...

    OK, maybe not fun, but kind of sad and "I can't believe people would do THAT!"...

    ETA: OK, so the state board does make the final decision, but they take the recommendation of the NPPC...and after looking, they sometimes reprimand, but also suspend for a year or less...I guess it helps with school-jumping...
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2008
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 18, 2008

    Is the revocation effective immediately? That would definitely be low - and counterproductive.
     
  7. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Tomorrow is the last day of classes and they have discouraged him from coming in.
     
  8. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    You're kidding! Boy, that's a board with the best interests of its students in mind <sarcastically>...
     
  9. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    I'd take the free day, my doubled salary, and say sayonara...it's their loss...
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    They told him not to come in for the last day of classes? How asinine.

    And had the board truly no idea how this might affect morale among the other teachers?? Or does it just not give a flying whiteboard eraser?
     
  11. Go 4th

    Go 4th Habitué

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    Sorry to hijack a moment but OMG!! I'm browsing thru, being nosey. One guy got a 20 year revocation, for 9 counts of sexual assualt on a child. OMG!! What do they have to do out there to get completely revoked? GEEZ!
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2008


    What does it say in his contract?..In my district (I'm in NJ) you need only give 60 days notice to leave your job....I've never heard of having a certificate revoked for breaking a contract...
     
  13. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I am vehemently opposed to the notion of the "teacher contract" we sign every year.

    It drives down wages because schools do not need to worry about their teachers leaving for higher paying districts.

    It allows admin to shirk their responsibilities to effectively manage their schools since they don't need to worry about teachers quitting mid year.

    It does not do anything to ensure educational consistency for students. In most districts, a teacher can transfer mid-year no problem. Moreover, it's quite common for districts to close down and consolidate classes when enrollment drops mid year.

    The bottom line is that if my district knew that I could hand in my two weeks notice at any time and go work at another school district, I'd get more respect and be better paid. School districts would have a genuine incentive to raise salaries because they actually would be able to attract teachers with them.
     
  14. CanukTeacher

    CanukTeacher Comrade

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    Interesting topic. I teach in Canada so its different up here. But I don't think competition between districts is what leads to better working conditions - its strong unions - and not too many. In Ontario there are only 3 unions - one elementary public, one catholic and one high school public. But we fortunately have very few public schools - that's where salaries are low and unionization is lower.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 19, 2008

    I agree that what they're doing is petty and vindictive.

    Yet if THEY broke contract and fired him on the spot, I'm guessing he would take legal action?

    I must admit: it bothers me when teachers look at the education of real kids as a career stepping stone. When you sign a contract, you make a legal agreement to teach in that place for a year. Doesn't a committment mean anything? How about your word?

    OK, fire away!
     
  16. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Dec 19, 2008

    Gladly.

    My point is that the purpose of the contract has nothing to do with any sort of obligation to the children. Were that the case, teachers would not be allowed to transfer mid year, bump other teachers out of their positions, or have their classes closed down and the kids transferred to other teachers.

    Schools do all sorts of things that interrupt childrens' education mid year. In our district, kids are involuntarily transferred or "overflowed" to other schools where enrollment is lower or when their classes are too full. I've had three kids in my class come and go this year as a result of this policy. It's all because the bean counters at the DO can't or won't accept the fact that you might need to run a class at less than full capacity from time to time.

    I would not be surprised if you went back and researched the origins of the teacher contract, that you'd find that it was devised as a tool to keep female teachers from getting married mid-year and leaving. It also could have been used to force them to leave at the end of the school year if they were planning to have children rather than take maternity leave when that actually happened, as is done now. Thus the annual contract is a rather antiquated notion.

    Finally, in our district, we must sign our contracts by July 1. Thus, if I find a job in another district over the summer, they can theoretically keep me from taking it. That has nothing to do with educational consistency for the children since school doesn't start until late August. Rather, it just makes it easier for our district to keep our salaries non-competitive since they seldom need to worry about attracting new teachers.
     
  17. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    I checked our contract and the state legislation. Our contract does not have any specified time period for handing in a resignation. What is stated is that if the school board does not accept your resignation and you leave anyway they can take your certificate. So in a nut shell what happened is that this teacher said they were going to leave and the school board did not accept the resignation and decided to go for the certificate in one big move. They then informed the teacher that their services were not needed for today. So, what happened? Other teachers had to cover that class and administer their final.
     
  18. sk8enscars311

    sk8enscars311 Companion

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    Dec 19, 2008

    I agree with this. When you take a new job you usually know very little about what you're getting into. You could be walking into your own personal nightmare. And guess what! You're stuck there for 9 more months. If you leave, let's hope you have a career back-up. It's not right. While I agree that children need to have the consistency of one teacher I also think that teachers deserve the option. Then you would have to hope that the administration is doing their job to make sure they are making it a desirable place to work. When there's a problem they know there's not much we can do... especially if you're in a district where the union is a joke. *ahem.. mine!*

    I've never really thought about all of this before. Interesting...
     
  19. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Ditto for the union thing.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 19, 2008

    I'm not in a union. I don't sign a contract... in my school, it's a "salary agreement." Either side can terminate at any time.

    I must admit ignorance to the political stuff you guys talk about. I've never been treated anything but wonderfully in the 2 schools in which I've taught. I'll always be especially grateful to the kindness I've been shown by my bosses this year.

    So maybe my point of view is naive. If so, I apologize.

    But when I give my word to do something, I try to the best of my ability to do it. If I agree to teach for a year, and sign a contract, I will teach for a year unless health issues prevent it. Likewise, if I have a contract that says I'm employed for a year, I fully expect it to be honored; that I won't get a call in August saying I've been dumped for a cheaper teacher.

    Again, I don't know the political end of it. But my word means something. If I agree to teach for a year, I will.

    According to the OP, this man applied for the new job last April; he signed a contract, never planning to keep his committment.

    I just think that's wrong.
     

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