Using Read-Aloud books on the lesson

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Alicia Ortego, May 12, 2022.

  1. Alicia Ortego

    Alicia Ortego Rookie

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    May 12, 2022

    Do you ever use read-aloud books in your lessons or as a part of homework? Does it go well with the lesson schedule? How do kids feel about that?
    I have done my share of research about read-aloud and the findings show a significant rise in the interest and the motivation to read with kids after watching a read-aloud story on YouTube. The thing is you can't find all of the books of one author on YouTube so if your kids like a story they would probably be interested in reading another piece by this author. Or they can make their own read-aloud online.
    I have also gathered a list of the top 25 YouTube Read-Aloud channels which are very popular with kids. The views and comments show that kids are interested and read-aloud books are entertaining and educating.
    So, what's your experience with read-alouds?
     
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  3. miss-m

    miss-m Groupie

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    May 12, 2022

    I love read alouds. They were a huge part of my reading instruction in my last district, and they definitely work to grab kids' attention, teach content and vocabulary, and practice a ton of other skills.
    I rarely use Youtube read alouds if I can help it though; there are a lot of great videos, but also a lot of really terrible ones that don't model fluent and expressive reading. I'd much rather read the book myself, especially because I can also be more responsive to students in terms of questions, checking for comprehension, and teaching points. Videos make that more tedious to me, and they don't always let me point out the features of the book I want students to focus on.
     
  4. Alicia Ortego

    Alicia Ortego Rookie

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    May 12, 2022

    Well, you're right. When you're preparing for a lesson and look through the book you immediately know what questions you want to discuss with your students and what points to motivate them to debate on. Ready-made read-alouds don't allow that, so I guess it's better to leave them for homework at times or just recommend them for self-education.
     
  5. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    May 12, 2022

    Read alouds are great, and I find them to be great as part of a lesson. I only tried one year trying to include them in homework--it simply didn't work. I feel the teacher needs to do the read aloud live and in person. YouTube read alouds aren't nearly as good in my opinion.
     
  6. Alicia Ortego

    Alicia Ortego Rookie

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    May 13, 2022

    I guess you're right. We can occasionally give read-alouds as a part of homework, also, only if you tried once and it worked well with kids. But when you read aloud in class you can see the reaction of kids and can engage them in the discussion.
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    May 14, 2022

    My middle school kids loved read aloud time. I always read the books because
    • I was reading novels or longer stories.
    • Kids get enough screen time as it is, and they get disinterested.
    • If I’m reading, it’s easier to stop and talk about it as needed.
    When teaching remotely, I made a lot of my own read-aloud videos. They included instruction. It was easier than looking for what I needed.
     
    readingrules12 likes this.

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