Using multiple intelligences

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Rockguykev, Nov 4, 2008.

  1. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Nov 4, 2008

    The last 2 years I've worked heavily on getting choice and differentiation into my classroom. I feel that it has been an incredible success. Colleagues and I have created a list of over 50 assignments for our social studies classes that students choose from on a regular basis. (www.mrroughton.com if you want to see them)

    Now I want to help kids choose. 50 options is really daunting and I want to simplify it a bit by classifying each assignment by the type of intelligence it mostly uses.

    Does anyone have any recommendations of Intelligence quizzes or surveys that they have used?

    Has anyone use MIs at all in their classes?

    It seems to me like it is a great idea I'm just not quite sure how I'm going to go about making it work!
     
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  3. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Nov 4, 2008

    I have several 'tests' I can send you if you PM me with your e-mail address. I also have the kids bar graph their intellegences, and I can send you the graph forms as well.

    After the kids take their test (the first week of school), they find out what their strongest intellegence is, and what their weakest is. You could allow them to do three projects from their strongest and then say they had to do one from their weakest or something. Ask them to reflect and evaluate their work after each project based on how easily the work was for them, etc. Ask them if their weakest intellegence was really THAT difficult, or if it was just mind over matter.
     
  4. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2008

    Wow, what a great projects. It must have been a daunting task to have made so many lessons for kids to choose from.
     
  5. Mrs. Q

    Mrs. Q Cohort

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    Nov 4, 2008

    I just wanted to add my praise! How wonderful of you to go to so much effort to allow your students to work in the way that best suits their abilities and interests. :)
     
  6. KLily21

    KLily21 Companion

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    Nov 5, 2008

    I have a test that I used this year with my seventh graders to determine their intelligence. Like Jem, I have my students take a MI test and then graph their results in a bar graph. Later I turned one of my big bulletin boards in the back of my room into one giant bar graph that shows each students' strongest intelligence. The kids loved seeing how their preferred learning style compares to that of their peers.

    I have been looking into using the MI information to implement some MI centers in my science class. PM me if you'd like to see my materials on MI.

    This website is pretty helpful, too: http://lth3.k12.il.us/rhampton/mi/LessonPlanIdeas.htm#Implementation Exercises
     
  7. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Nov 5, 2008

    Not only would 50 options be overwhelming, but after a month or so they wouldn't even feel so exciting anymore. I would probably feature just a few activities from each area at a time -- perhaps add one new one each week while weeding out those that are getting old.

    I'm not sure what you mean by quizzes/tests. If you mean the type that are intended to raise awareness of your MI strengths, I'm not sure what you would use it for. The way I see it, all kids benefit from activities in all areas, and they naturally gravitate towards the ones that they like best, so MI quizzes are pretty extraneous, in my opinion. I think their best use is for teachers who are first learning about MI, to give you an idea of what it's all about.
     
  8. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Nov 5, 2008

    I felt like sharing....Tomorrow is my first PLC workshop (teaching it). It is geared for Aides and how they can help the instructional process. I decided to start with MI! Our PLC are SHORT due to bus duty so I'm splitting the topic up. Tomorrow I am giving a test along with a explanation sheet based on adult working/learning styles. Some of it has aide/teacher type duties and others is general. I'm asking them to think about adult working relationships with coworkers and how our learning style guides our working style. Then I'm having them fill out an info sheet with other information and it includes their learning styles for my own information. The lead in is just to be aware of it again so that when we talk about how it applies to the students, it'll already be familiar enough that I don't have to waste time going into it. My goal is to have everyone brainstorm ways we can meet different multiple intelligences without interrupting the teacher's plan. We might, for example, choose to explain an impromptu problem in different ways accordingly. As aides, we aren't going to necessarily always know the child's learning style but being aware of it means we step outside of our working/learning style to consider other creative methods and approaches as needed.
     
  9. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Nov 5, 2008

    Great idea, cutNglue.

    I think MI is most useful when asking students to do meta-cognitive reflecting on their work. If they know where their strengths and weaknesses are, they are better equipped to use proper language and analyzation in their evaluations.

    For example, I am a highly, HIGHLY visual person. If something isn't written down, forget about it-I sure will! If I were evaluating myself as a teacher, I would say that I depend on visual aids to both learn and explain myself when teaching. I need to make lists and surround my room with bulletin boards to keep myself on track in subjects. I tend to get frustrated with students when drawings and verbal explanations don't work. My weakness is kinethestics. I have to work really hard at remembering that my active students need to move during the day. I started out giving dance breaks, asking them to tap out rhythms, etc. That seems to have fallen by the wayside as they year has progressed. I get brainbursts of cool hands-on activities, but no so much in math-I could involve more movement and play in that area.

    If students can do this same exercise with their unit reflections, that is very powerful.
     
  10. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    Nov 30, 2008

    I actually like using this simple inventory - it sort of combines all the learning style models - the kids also like the terms. This isn't exactly the one I use, you can update the terms if you like to suit your kids but it gives you an idea -
    http://www.turningpointtechnology.com/DL/CSP/09921.pdf

    Then you would just have four categories to sort your assignments under, which would make them a bit easier to rotate through.

    Thank you for your willingness to share!
     

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