Using a behavior clip chart

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by jlj, Feb 14, 2014.

  1. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Feb 14, 2014

    1. What specific behaviors warrant having a clip moved?
    2. Certain behaviors for certain colors or just move up or down in order?
    3. What are the specific consequences for each color?

    I am having a terrible time with my class this year! Absolutely nothing works. I'm ready to walk out. Please :help:!!
     
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  3. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Feb 14, 2014

    1. Repeating a misbehavior (id: sally and billy are talking 2x after being told to stop 2x on the carpet. That'd be a color change). Hitting of course is a change, swearing, not being kind to others, spilling breakfast and NOT telling the teacher so we can clean it up before it gets sticky, also taking other peoples belongings, or playing in the bathroom. Basically breaking class rules/school procedures

    2. I typically only move the color once regardless of the behavior. It has to be really bad to move a color twice. Like i had a child steal another child's chips then lie about it. That thief skipped yellow, red and went straight to blue, the lowest color.

    3. Yellow is a warning. Red is in class time out. Blue is trip to office or another teacher for timeout.
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Feb 15, 2014

    If your class is having a tough time, I'd recommend something more involved than a behavior clip chart. My experience has been that these systems break down very easily when behavior gets challenging. They can be fine for a class that is already behaving relatively okay and needs a little something extra. I would research some various classroom reinforcement systems that have more steps, opportunities for reinforcement, opportunities for consequences, etc., and would also look beyond rewards and consequences, such as your social skills training/prompting/reinforcement, instructional organization, etc.
     
  5. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Feb 15, 2014

    I always allowed my kiddos to move back up. Some things like lying, stealing, hitting move straight to the lowest rung and I speak to the parents. Otherwise, I give a warning and the 2nd time I move them.

    What works at my school is rewarding the good behavior. We use a baseball diamond. Bases and the bench are good. The bench is your typical green. Strikes are like moving the clips. I always gave a reward for the positive behavior. Everyone got a small sticker for being on the bench. I gave a bigger sticker or a smelly sticker for 1st base. A small trinket or sticker for 2nd base. For 3rd base it was a choice from the treasure box. For a home run it was usually a prize the next day, maybe lunch with me or something.

    I rarely gave out home runs or 3rd bases. So those were always special. Specials teachers would also give out bases & strikes.

    We had a sheet that we recorded where they ended the day at.

    I also would give out random bases, 1 boy, 1 girl maybe at bathroom break or walking in the hall.

    For me it worked. Of course, there were those students who needed something a little different.
     
  6. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Feb 15, 2014

    EdEd I agree about looking at other areas. I have scrutinized my schedule, lessons, etc. The same behaviors are on going no matter what's going on, where they are, or what teacher/class they are in. And yes, the parents of the main ones are very well aware of their child's behavior. I have spoken to parents and I send notes home. Parents have expressed behavior issues at home as well. The main ones are AD, ADHD, and 2 with something going on (possible some level of autisim with one and one being neuro tested now). None of them are on medication although the Director of the school has asked all of them to discuss further with their physicians (parents are not wanting to medicate their children). I understand that, I even agree but there are times when it is needed; that and/or behavior counciling. Something for goodness sakes! We do not offer special ed classes but are willing to work with parent and child when possible depending on what's best for all. At this point, the other children of course copy the unwanted behaviors.
    I should add that mine is not the only class with so many behavior issues. It seems to get worse every year. As more and more discipline is taken out of the homes, we pay for it in the classrooms.
    Anyway.... I've been teaching for a number of years, I've tried about everything with this group. I'm totally exhausted at the end of each day. And I feel so bad for the few that do their best ,they are getting aggravated with the others. I try to give them extra privillages, etc.
    Everyone please continue to share your wisdom and suggestions!
     
  7. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Feb 16, 2014

    Sounds like a tough group! Based on what you mentioned, I would start thinking more about individual behavior plans than a group plan. Having a group plan is fine and good, of course, but if you have kids with more significant behavioral needs individually, a group plan may not do much, particularly if it's just a clip system.

    If it would be helpful, I'd suggest that we could think through some strategies for each individual child. (maybe a new thread for each one so it gets attention of other forum members?)
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Feb 16, 2014

    We were prohibited from using any behavior chart that was visible to the whole class. We had daily behavior sheets that went home with children who had a great deal of difficulty.
     
  9. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Feb 16, 2014

    I agree that a clip chart may not be your best bet with this group. Your little friends would be on red every day! Clip charts do not change behavior, they only track it. This is especially true for student with special needs or behavioral issues. I have a few of these kiddos like you described in my room and I know how exhausting is.

    Have you tried individual plans or positive reinforcement systems? Focus on the behavior you want. This way the kids that are doing the right thing also get incentive for continuing that behavior. I can give you more specific ideas and things to try if you are interested.
     
  10. themilocat

    themilocat Rookie

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    Feb 16, 2014

    The first year I used a clip chart was with a REALLY tough group of kids. I didn't use the common color chart. Instead, I used a 0-10 chart. Students started at 5 each day, and could go all the way up to 10, or clip down all the way to 0. 4 was a warning, 3 was a lap at recess, 2 was walking all recess, 1 had students spend their recess writing a description of their behavior that landed them on 1 and a plan for clipping up, and 0 was a phone call home by the student.

    What really worked for my students was that they could clip up to the next level after completing the task on 0-3. So, if they were on 3 and walked their lap at recess, they got to move up to 4 when we came back in. It really worked when the student had to write the description of the behavior. If no effort was put into it, he/she would automatically move to 0, but if they made a good plan, they could move up to 2.

    Following through was my biggest problem, but having the consequence posted on each level of the chart REALLY helped. Students automatically knew what to do if they were on level 2.

    I recorded their score each day on a paper calendar I made (boxes for each day, and the numbers 0-10), printed, and taped onto their desks. I would highlight their number at the end of each day. This helped them track their behavior all the time.

    At the end of each quarter, I would total their points, and they could cash them in for things like computer time, "money" to spend in a classroom store, etc. For the classroom store, I put out a request to my facebook friends for donations of toys, books, and knickknacks. I received everything from McDonald's toys to (clean!) stuffed animals to video games to picture frames to candles. I put a price on everything and let the kids shop. They loved this, and loved having the most points to buy the big things!

    When I started using this 0-10 clip chart, my class's behavior completely changed. They went from being mean to each other, not paying attention in class, and not turning in homework to being a fun group of kids to teach!
     
  11. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Feb 17, 2014

    Individual plans might be the best way to go but how do you have enough time in the day to keep track of and/or send notes home every day for over half of the class?

    Rebecca- and everyone else- - interested in more specific ideas for sure!
     
  12. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Feb 17, 2014

    jlj if it's over half your class and there are common root causes then a group plan works, if not ideal. it's when you have kids with different issues that wouldn't respond to a common plan that is concerning. My experience has been that if you have over 20% of your class having issues, you may need a group plan.

    A reinforcement plan is definitely good, but I'd research beyond a clip system such as type of token economy (even something simple like Class Dojo). I would also look at adding social skills training, linking that with your assessment system, then problem-solving any specific times/activities when behaviors occur and revisit your procedures during that time.
     
  13. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Feb 17, 2014

    Completely agree. I take time to make a huge push in my class for manners, classroom community, empathy, and conflict resolution. Of course most teachers do this at the start of the year but my firsties need continual reinforcement of these social skills. For example, we have a problem solving bucket where they can write their issues and we discuss how to solve them at the end of each day.

    I only have about five that have been or are currently on a behavior plan. I try and emphasize the positive, having them work toward earning something for good choices. I break their behavior plans down into each part of the day so it is not a good day, bad day black and white situation. We discuss and reflect on their choices at the end of the day. As a class, we earn tickets for good choices. Now they earn them as a class, but at the beginning of the year they were also able to earn them individually. This was highly motivating to some of my kiddos. I am of the mindset of prevention rather then reaction so think of the times of day your kids have the most difficultly. If you can give us specific areas, we can help you problem solve but I am continually doing this. Visual schedules And directions are also extremely helpful. That's all I can think of for now!
     

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