Urgent Need Read 180 help

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Bbiek001, Aug 5, 2014.

  1. Bbiek001

    Bbiek001 Rookie

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    I am a first year teacher and my school stuck me with READ 180 even though there is no mention of it during the interview. Regardless, they have given me this class of 21 to run this program and I have no training, a manual from 2009, none of the software installed, don't know how to use the software, and every teacher I talk to acts like it is the worse class ever. The guy that had it before me was a teacher for 10 years and quit after one year. I am a brand new teacher and don't want to burn out in my first year. Please help if you can...
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Is this in dream district? Just curious.
     
  4. Bbiek001

    Bbiek001 Rookie

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    No, this is not. This is the job I am currently was hired for. They told me I would be teaching 9th and 10th LA or one of those and AVID originally. My first day they told me I have this READ 180, a sheltered LA 2, and two more classes of regular LA 2. Every teacher I talk to acts like READ 180 is the worst class ever and it is 9th grade but was informed every kid on average has a 4th grade reading level. I know your remark was snide, but honestly I hope I get a job in the DREAM District since I would be teaching drama, 7th, or 8th LA which I love middle school the most anyway. Regardless of what people think of me on here I would appreciate help.
     
  5. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    I'm not sure why they think READ 180 is so bad. Our reading intervention teacher uses it and I think she likes it. I haven't used it, so not much help, but...

    The students will probably already be familiar with the program. They probably used it in middle school. So, they can probably help you more than you'd expect in terms of how it's run.

    Have you checked out the Scholastic website. They may have something to help you.

    If classes start tomorrow, don't even try to do READ 180 yet. Have some other activity prepared until you can get a handle on it.

    Good Luck!
     
  6. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Get the software installed, ASAP. That should be considered a non-negotiable for you. After that, I would suggest you read the manual extremely carefully, and be a very squeaky wheel asking for PD on the program. I can't help on specifics, but I do know a program as intense as Read 180 really needs program-specific training.

    I'd also agree in saying to hold off on starting the actual program until you know more about it.
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Whether or not you believe this, I have no problem with you longing for and working towards your dream position. There isn't a teacher here that doesn't long for it, trust me. Sometimes it takes time to get to that dream, however; how you face trials under pressure will go a long way in making you the best possible candidate when your real chance shows up. Having students that are reading below grade level, and I mean fourth is not the worst I have seen, is an epidemic, so now is a great chance to learn and experience how to help this population. This population is found in all districts - it doesn't play favorites. Hone your skills here and make a difference for these students. They need you, and that is actually a scary but solemn truth. We all hope we are up to the challenge, every single day. That's just talking teaching - the stakes get really high when it is a child of your own. You can do this - believe more in yourself and less in horror stories which may or may not be true. Time will tell, but you get to author most of the story. Good luck.
     
  8. Bbiek001

    Bbiek001 Rookie

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    I completely agree and my issue is not with teaching students that are at that reading level. The issue is, and I do not want to presume whether you have or have not come into contact with READ 180, the program itself. It uses a lot of computer programs, group work, and a specific regimented curriculum that you have to follow. I myself have not been properly informed, given the materials, or training to teach this type of program. Teachers that teach AVID are given three days during summer int he district to learn how to teach AVID, because it is a different curriculum than what they prepared for in their teacher training program. READ 180 is drastically different than any thing you would have learned form an English program due to its structure and use of outside materials. The lack of training is what I am nervous and stressed over not the teaching itself.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I certainly would approach my administration with my sincere desire to be proficient with their curriculum of choice, and as someone else suggested, offer genuine desire to receive training, to prepare yourself to be an excellent teacher for these students. Truly, best of luck.
     
  10. Bbiek001

    Bbiek001 Rookie

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    Yes, I have. I am meting with the principal to voice my concerns, because my biggest fear is being an ineffectual teacher to this kids who are so far behind due to my lack in training in the program.
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    It may help if you go into that meeting having done a little research. Be prepared to tell your principal where and when the next training is being offered on the program, and see if he/she will pay for you go to. Be able to give a Cliff Note's argument for why the software is so vital. Explain specific concerns you have with teaching the program without training (so not "I don't know the program!" but "The manual specifies A-B-C, and I feel I need to get guidance from an experienced professional on what that will look like."

    I know it may be an unfair expectation for a new teacher under the stress you are under, but you probably are only going to have one shot to prove your case to your principal, and you want to make sure you do it.
     
  12. Bbiek001

    Bbiek001 Rookie

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    I wrote out a letter of about 800 words to read off of. It feels less effective, but I think it allows me the chance to fully explain my feelings and thoughts on the situation.
     
  13. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    That's a lot of talking. Can you condense it?
     
  14. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    I think you'll be very lucky to get enough time with your P to cover 800 words.

    I'd plan for less.
     
  15. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    Also, you may not be using it the way it's intended. My district does 40 minutes/day. I think the program demands 90/day. I know some classroom teachers who are required to use it, but have never been trained. Be prepared to figure it out on your own.
     
  16. Bbiek001

    Bbiek001 Rookie

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    Yes, the class is two periods for a combined 90 minutes. I think I come to the realization that i need to ask to step down from the position because I cannot be an effective teacher to my students using this program. I asked during the interview process what I would be teaching, and if they would have told me this was a class I would not have taken the contract at all. I am fresh out of my studies and have experience tutoring EL and SN students at a tutoring center, but this program seems to necessitate a through understanding of a multitude of materials I have not even been given. I know it is a horrible thing to do, but hopefully they can get someone in there that has a better understanding than me. At the end of the day kids come first and these kids are so far behind i feel I would only hinder them more by not knowing how to properly educate them with this program.
     
  17. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    I have no comment.
     
  18. nklauste

    nklauste Comrade

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    I am going on my third year teaching Read 180. It is a very intense program and I was trained by one of the Scholastic Read 180 trainers before my first year. My suggestion would be to get in contact with Scholastic and find out who the implementation director would be for your district (Scholastic has people all over the country and someone is assigned to your region) and then get in contact with this person. If you have any questions a peer could answer, feel free to PM me as the program is too intense to concisely answer in a post.
     
  19. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    I used Read 180 several years ago in an intervention class. No training at first. The materials do seem overwhelming I agree.

    I had an aide in the room and later we had a literacy coach assist with teaching. The first six months I was pretty much on my own. The aide just monitored the kids. It was setting up the different groups that made the difference for me. Teaching, computer, independent reading, alternative activity, etc.

    I did the training two months into the school year. It was offered at another district about forty miles away. It helped but doing the different groups was the lifesaver.

    Make sure you have all the materials for the program. There are many components.

    Also, don't give up before you start. Often times kids in these classes don't get consistency with teachers. People get burned out, give up and go to an easier teaching job. It impacts how well the kids learn, their ability to trust adults. I love a challenge and truly enjoyed the teaching with the kids. The bureaucracy with the administration and lack of support was hard to deal with. It will make you a better teacher.

    The district may not be able to find another teacher who has Read 180 background after you leave.
     

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