Unrealistic expectations?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by sarypotter, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    Mar 13, 2008

    I just got yelled at by a parent for not teaching long division to a child who can't count to three.

    I'm the sister and the aunt of individuals with special needs, and I understand wanting your loved one to succeed beyond all expectations. But I also understand that my nephew's time is better spent learning to stop when you scream, "STOP, A CAR IS COMING!" and to remain clothed in public than it is learning algebra and geography. Why can't the parents of a couple of my students understand the same about their kids?

    I'm not asking anyone to give up their big dreams for their children, but don't we have an obligation to our students to focus our teaching on what is developmentally appropriate right now?

    Sorry, I'm just very frustrated. And possibly balding; I think I left a few handfuls of hair in the conference room. :help:
     
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  3. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Mar 13, 2008

    Oh--I feel your pain--sometimes you either take it personally or just have to laugh. . . It's so hard working with the parents and trying to be sensitive to their grieving and hoping processes while encouraging them to be realistic in a way that is productive for their child. Hope your day got better after the meeting!
     
  4. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Mar 13, 2008

    It doesn't get any better. Here in Alabama they have the AAA, Alabama Alternate Assessment and Extended Standards for the more moderate to severe MR students. While these students need to be doing things more relevant to their needs, the extended standards have them covering things that are grade level. SOME OF THESE KIDS BARELY KNOW THEY are in this world. It makes no sense at all.
     
  5. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Mar 13, 2008

    I agree!

    Look what we have to do for our IEP objectives now:

    MATH3.1C Determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.
    Billy will be able to sort coins (quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies) to their corresponding picture and value.

    We have to write the GRADE LEVEL state objective, followed by a "pre-requisite skill" that is related to that state objective.

    It's NUTS! The parents know their child is not determining the value of a collection of coins and bills! This is actually one of my higher children because he can sort all four coins at once!!!

    This is all so we are following NCLB. My students are "on grade level." Nice, right?

    Here's another:
    SCI2.2 Gather information using simple equipment and tools to extend the senses.
    Bobby will use basic cooking utencils to create food items during group cooking projects with maximum to minimum prompting

    The second grade science goal is listed first, and then the "expectation" for the student is listed afterwards. Using the spoon to stir during a functional cooking project is "on grade level!"

    Nutty.
     
  6. sarypotter

    sarypotter Comrade

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    Mar 14, 2008

    I am so with you on the inappropriateness of assessment requirements. I teach a student for whom my main priorities right now are to teach her to stand from her chair without falling and to use a "Bathroom" card to initiate for bathroom.

    On her alternative assessment, she's supposed to exhibit that she recognizes the importance of historical figures like George Washington.

    Do you think I can loosely tie George WASHington to hand-WASHing? :whistle:
     
  7. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Mar 16, 2008

    This is what happens when the people making the rules are totally out of touch with what's going on in the classrooms. :rolleyes:
     
  8. Kate Change

    Kate Change Companion

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    Mar 18, 2008

    Yikes! That's hard. I try to tell myself that they are so incredibly impressed with the progress I have made with their child, that they believe that anything can be accomplished. I am completely aware that this thought is delusional, but it still makes me smile a little.

    The kids I work with have an ED/BD diagnosis and I consider it a successful day if we work most of the day and no one hides under a desk or bites anyone. It's hard to articulate this as a goal at IEP meetings.
     

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