Unofficial extended time

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Backroads, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Apr 21, 2017

    In recognition that a common IEP accommodation is to give students extra time on completing tasks...

    How would you balance this without an IEP? I have a Kiddo who holds his own academically, yet I have strongly suggested to his parents they look into his attention span. I have unofficially been treating him like the rest of my ADHD bunch for quite a few months now. He has a lot of trouble getting things finished and his chair pocket is constantly filled with half-finished projects (I don't think I do that much paperwork...) I have to remind him every time we have a project or paper to turn it in when complete.

    Perhaps it's the spring and the approaching end of the school year, but the past week or so has severely intensified this behavior.

    I gave a fairly important math test this morning, one we needed official grades on. Math is first thing in the day, and I kept allowing him more time throughout the day to work on it. By afternoon, I told him it was a priority and to let other things slide. I cut up the test in sections to be completed, I allowed him many breaks, I eventually found another quiet room he could work in. By the end of the day, he had completed about a third of the test (20 math problems).

    The vast majority of the class, including the rest of my ADHD bunch, finished the test in 20 minutes.

    I really really really want to just grade based on what I have--and by that I mean marking wrong the problems he didn't get to for data's sake. Then, the part of me that really wants to help him wants to give him more time on Monday to finish.

    But... wow, at what point does the extra time, particularly without an IEP, just become meaningless? Where do I put my foot down and say you've had enough time?

    And in a more general sense, exactly how much extra time do you give those who have such an official accommodation?
     
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  3. LouiseB

    LouiseB Cohort

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    Apr 21, 2017

    Even extra time written on an IEP might not mean days to complete.
     
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  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Apr 21, 2017

    Unfortunately, if you ever want him evaluated for an IEP, you have to have evidence that he can't perform. You will need these types of tests to show that. I think you gave him every opportunity.
     
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  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 21, 2017

    Document document document. Cc the child study/sped team
     
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  6. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    What was the point of the assessment? Was it for him to demonstrate his understanding of the topic? If you want to find out what he knows, find an alternate assessment - can you interview him and set him up with some hands on tasks to complete while you observe?

    If the point of the assessment was to test his test-taking skills, then do not give him any longer.
     
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  7. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    For one kiddo, I simply said that whatever wasn't finished by "x" would be marked wrong. I did this knowing that he had a relatively good grasp of the concept, and thus should have no problem getting it done. On the other hand, I've done that sometimes and it's left a student getting a '1', such as on a piece of writing. I think we can communicate with the parents and other future teachers that it was a '1' due to work ethic and not because of ability. I'd rather have it become a topic of discussion / cognitive dissonance for the child then rather than down the line when they get into high school.

    To note, I can change any grade at the end of the year -- even if the gradebook says that they are trending to a 2.5, I can bump that to a 3 if I felt that was truly where they were at.
     
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  8. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Here, those are two separate skills and I cannot give a student a low mark on content because of a work ethic skill. I report on behaviour and study skills separately from the content. It depends on what the expectations are. Definitely keep a paper trail of unfinished work and document how long assignments take, but please also provide alternate ways for the student to show you what they know.
     
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  9. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Apr 21, 2017

    The point of the assessment was a grade level-wide standard test to check for consistency of understanding addition so... a little of both?

    I do feel confident of what he knows through other means. This situation boils down to this situation... perhaps a fear of just not learning to finish things.

    Tangentially, my alternative assessments in math all pretty much boil down to the same thing: solve this math problem, child. Now show me you can consistently add numbers. Which was what Kiddo was doing here, or supposed to be, all 6 problems he did. (which in itself is probably a satisfactory range to check for understanding.)

    Yet when we speak of alternative assessments in math, I guess I can't think of any that aren't some variation of "add these numbers together". What else is there?
     
  10. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Apr 22, 2017

    IEPs specify HOW MUCH extra time a student gets. It's usually 1.5 to 2 times the amount. Not unlimited time.
     
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  11. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I would agree that you probably have enough evidence that he understands the skill between your anecdotal observations and the problems that he did solve.

    When I noticed one of my students struggling with a written assessment (this was in grade 2) I would pull them aside and say to them "What is ## + ##?" and give them a white board and marker. They would get to work and solve the question. Then I would ask "How do you know that?" and they would explain their strategy. Our math curriculum is more focus on the strategies students use, so I usually ended up interviewing most of the class.

    You want to see if he adds, so that is what you will assess. I think it's more about alternative to paper and pencil whole group assessment. Obviously that does not work for him. So while he still participates in that, he also needs a chance to actually show you what he knows and not be penalized in math because he has trouble focusing. His math grade should not reflect his attention span. It sounds like you are willing to do what it takes to find out what he knows, and that is awesome!

    It sounds like you have a standard assessment you have to administer and you went to acceptable lengths to accommodate your student in completing that task.
     
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  12. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Apr 22, 2017

    I definitely see your point, and it's always on my mind, hence the note at the bottom about being able to change the grades at the end so the academic grades reflect their academics. For the occasional kiddo though, it acts as a wake up call that something needs to change. Naturally, I approach it differently for each kid.

    That being said, part of a content skill, I believe, is being able to actually produce it. Not in all cases, but if you're requiring teacher support or prompting the entire way (void of IEP/504, etc...), it shows you cannot do that skill independently yet.

    In the end, this is why I don't focus much of any on grades with my kiddos: everything is about how they can improve - celebrate success and find ways to improve.
     
  13. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I absolutely agree - and since we don't give grades, I comment on that on the report card. "Needs teacher support and prompting to articulate strategies." Then on the behaviours section I comment "Needs additional time and support to complete paper and pencil tasks."
     
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  14. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Apr 22, 2017

    Of course you know this, but you will need to fade out teacher prompts and support. You can't provide them in 3rd grade when they take PARCC.
     

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