Uniforms, Standard Student Attire...Your thoughts?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, May 26, 2016.

?

Should students be required to wear uniforms?

  1. Yes

    9 vote(s)
    36.0%
  2. No

    10 vote(s)
    40.0%
  3. In certain circumstances (explain in comments)

    6 vote(s)
    24.0%
  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 28, 2016

    I really don't think a school board is going to implement a uniform policy out of the blue without consideration of the wants of the population. I just don't see your fear as being a real issue. If that many people oppose a considered uniform policy plan, they'd probably make their voices known.
     
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  2. TXforever

    TXforever Companion

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    May 29, 2016

    My previous school had them, and I hated it. It was one more thing to manage, one more thing for parents to get irritated at you over. I felt extremely sorry for the heavier kids since shirts were required to be tucked in. I'm on the heavier side, and would feel very self conscious if I had to tuck my shirt in. Even though one of their goals was to make social classes not as obvious, it didn't work. The upper socioeconomic kids still had clothes from Abercrombie and Fitch and the lower socioeconomic kids didn't.

    I also see the point of cost. Yes, parents have to buy clothes anyway. However, non-uniform clothes can be worn in many different situations. What kid would want to wear a polo and khakis to a b-day party or family reunion? It'd kind of be like buying two sets of clothes, IMO.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2016
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  3. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    May 30, 2016

    In the UK most schools have uniforms of one sort or another. Some are very regimented with blazers, ties etc. My school insists on a school sweatshirt with logo, white polo shirt (again with logo) and black skirt or trousers with black shoes. It also specifies the colour of accessories such as hair bands and specifies how many and what type of earrings are allowed. However enforcement of this just becomes another stick to beat the teachers with as the start of every lesson is a litany of making students remove non uniform items or replacing items with uniform items.

    The argument that it makes everyone the same and stops the richer kids showing off is a fallacious. Affluence can be spotted even if everyone is in uniform. New shiny uniforms frequently replaced against articles now being used by the third sibling/cousin.

    Kids constantly pushing the boundaries of the uniform with accessories, our latest one is coloured contact lenses, last year it was multiple bracelets and looking at some of the gothier kids the next one will be shaved heads al la Black Veil Brides.

    Trouble is UK schools are too frightened to drop uniform as in parents' minds it shows discipline and projects an image. However if you stood outside our gate at leaving time you would be hard pressed to notice that we had a uniform as so many students remove it or cover it up before stepping off the premises.

    Latest scam with our Academy schools (like your Charters) is the uniform now has to be bought from the school itself. White polo shirt from ASDA (Walmart) £2 ($3) same shirt with the school logo on it from school £35 ($50)!
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    May 30, 2016

    It was your hardline stance I was reacting to since I've seen this stance at the workplace level too.

    I know enough families who struggle just to get any clothing for their children. I couldn't imagine a school starting a new policy and choosing a dress code in a community that didn't have one before.

    I see I just disagree with others, which is fine.

    I also know that a lot of poor families will find a way to get a new uniform (in a community that has an established uniform dress code) just so they don't stand out in another way as poor and not worthy since the poor are often looked upon as less worthy while the wealthier but thrifty will not care so much because they have attributes of being the "better class" of people.
     
  5. Letsgo

    Letsgo Rookie

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    May 31, 2016

    I work at a private school with a pretty strict dress code and no uniforms. To be honest, I wish we would just have uniforms instead of dealing with all of the dress code infractions.
     
  6. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Jun 1, 2016

    Having a uniform will not stop the infractions.
     
  7. Mr.Literature

    Mr.Literature Companion

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    Jun 2, 2016

    Honestly I hate the uniforms. I have too many things on my plate. If the kid isn't dressed inappropriately, I don't see how their jacket that says "Nike" is impeding them from learning. Our kids aren't allowed to wear any clothing with logos. I'm sorry, but many of our kids don't have money for lunch, and I'm not going to write them up or take the piece of clothing that is keeping them warm. It might be the one thing they have. There are some teachers that enjoy calling the kids on dress code. I am not one of them.
     
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  8. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 2, 2016

    It does help, but sheesh... some of the "uniform" skirts are terribly short. I teach elementary, and most of the time the girls are unaware, they've just grown. But sometimes I wonder how the parents let them leave the house like that. Our kids sit crisscross on the floor, run at PE, etc... they should not be wearing short skirts.
     
  9. reg

    reg Rookie

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    Jul 15, 2016

    The school that I'll be teaching at in August has uniforms and enforcement is very inconsistent. If a student is out of compliance (including not wearing an ID), they must be sent to in-school suspension until a parent/guardian brings them a change of clothes or brings them an ID/buys them a temp (I'm still a little shaky on the ID policy; it has something to do with preventing kids from "losing" ID's to get out of class then magically finding them later.) I understand why consistent enforcement is important, but if I send a kid to ISS and they miss out on instruction, it then becomes my problem to get them caught up. We have a huge problem with absenteeism. I really don't want to have even fewer kids in my class because I've sent them out due to uniform issues. An additional issue is that getting sent to ISS really isn't a deterrent for students and can ever be what they want. I've seen students get in trouble with a teacher than then try to send themselves to ISS because they'd rather be there than in class.

    I wish that lunch or after school detentions were an option as opposed to ISS for uniform violations. Having students miss up to a full day of instruction just seems like it hurts students academically a lot more than it teaches them the importance of wearing their uniform.
     
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  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 15, 2016

    My feeling is that reg has hit the key consideration: whether it is a uniform or a dress code, if enforcement is inconsistent and arbitrary, the policy will be applied unfairly. Our students read our actions very well. If Sally Student Perfect is a teacher favorite and the rules get bent for her, while Daniel Does Everythingwrong gets written up for even the smallest infraction it is not equitable or fair. If these dress codes are not going to be applied consistently, whether or not the uniform angle is included, then why should the students believe we will be fair about any other policy we implement?

    I have stated it before, but will say it again - dress codes, IMHO, should be enforced by admin standing at the door when students are entering the building. Not enough admin for that, then pay someone else to help, but stop the dress code drama at the door. When that doesn't happen, and trust me, it seldom happens, it falls on a few teachers to become the designated DC police, and it is never the male teachers (which I do understand how that works). I have seen teachers who are reprimanded for not enforcing the dress code, but it is always a female teacher, since it has become "their" job to enforce the will of others who are never actually involved in enforcing the dress code.

    If admin was tasked with carrying out the program, whether uniforms or DC, then they would work harder to come up with equitable solutions for students dressed in clean clothes that are what the parents can afford or receive. I believe that most DC infractions at the HS level are all about hormones - girls and guys dress to impress the opposite sex, and if they can strike a blow for their "independence" along the way, well, that is the old "killing two birds with one stone" adage.

    I favor non-provocative clothing for both sexes because it gives me a chance to make learning the center of attention while in class. To that end, I have become a designated DC Police because I work with a mostly male staff. I HATE it! If the male staff don't want to address the clothing of the females, what is the reason that they ignore the inappropriate dress of the males? All I ever want is equality, with the same rules for everyone.

    I don't believe that ISS is the appropriate response to DC violations, unless, while trying to fix the problem, tempers flare, but hey, that is a different problem. At a prior school I worked at, girls with revealing tops or too short of shorts or skirts were treated to whatever HUGE size t-shirt that the office had in the closet. It was surprising how many of these students "found" more appropriate clothing in their backpacks. For the guys, with pants showing multiple inches of underwear, we had packing twine or old belts that were required for the rest of the day.

    In the case of a multiple offender, I discovered that he didn't own a belt, and quietly he told me that he had to wear his brother's hand me downs, which were too big. The next day, when he was once again sent to the office for sagging pants, he was told to pick one of the new belts that had just been "found" and that he was welcome to keep the one that fit him, with a couple of styles to choose from. He was amazed and so proud. When I saw him in the hall the next morning, he came running up and said "No write-up today!" I told him I had already noticed, and was writing him a positive even as we spoke.

    My son has more clothes than he will ever wear, and he was happy to be a silent donor for a good cause. He even found some stylish pants/jeans in the right size, or closer to the right size, and left a care package for the fellow from time to time, no name tag, no one to make it something bigger than it had to be. I had the young man in my class the next semester, and I came to appreciate the family drama that he was hiding from the world. I saw those pants and the belt that I knew so well on a regular basis. Did this turn him into an A student? Not quite, but it did allow him to be a student, more secure in his place in the student body. I think of him every time I have to write up a student who is wearing the best that they own, even if it is not DC compliant. How to solve the problems should fall on admin or the boards who create DCs that are not fair, but that is the topic of a different thread, don't you think? :2cents:
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2016
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  11. ha336

    ha336 Rookie

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    Jul 17, 2016

    As a student growing up in a school with uniforms, I loved it. It took minimal amount of time to get ready because I didn't have to decide what to wear.
    As a parent, I would like them. Again- no decisions on what to wear.
    However, as a teacher who has previously taught at a school with uniforms- I hated them. When I had to spend a portion of my morning having all the students stand up to do a uniform check, then sending one to the office with a referral because their belt was the wrong color- I was over uniforms.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jul 18, 2016

    This reminds me of how as a system we punish those who are the poorest. It may not be monetarily, it may be emotionally or cognitively instead. I'm not implying that behaviors don't have to change, but the system most often looks to punishment as a way to fix a problem that is created by being poor in one area or another. We should also not confuse what we see being displayed by students after having to deal with years of this practice because that is something that was created by being in a mandatory situation they are required to belong.
     
  13. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jul 18, 2016

    That is a drawback of uniform policies. When they are so restrictive that the color of a belt is an issue, it causes more problems.
     
  14. reg

    reg Rookie

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    Jul 18, 2016

    "I think of him every time I have to write up a student who is wearing the best that they own, even if it is not DC compliant."

    This is a huge thing for me. One of our uniform policies is that students may wear a solid colored hoodie in the school color OR just about any full-zip jacket. We have a number of students who show up in non-compliant hoodies but they're otherwise perfectly appropriate. I am very uncomfortable with the idea of telling kids to remove their hoodie when it's very cold out, even if it isn't compliant. Most kids aren't covering multiple items of outerwear and I do not believe in making kids go cold. It's absolutely possible that they don't own anything that fits the outerwear guidelines. Come winter, I might go see if I can pick up some compliant jackets and hoodies from thrift stores to have as loaners. I don't want to tell someone to take off their hoodie if there's nothing else for them to wear.
     

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