Unexperienced teacher(?) going to interviews

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by anna9868, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Jun 28, 2008

    Hello,
    I'd like to tell my story to see if anyone can identify with parts of it and also ask some questions.

    I'm a stay-at-home mom (with children 6 and 2.5 y.o.) I have switched to teaching because I thought I love to work with children, I got my Masters in Early Childhood, got the liscense and did some substitute teaching.

    I was hoping I would start working once my younger one is in school, but it looks like stay-at-home role is not really for me, because I'm kind of going crazy from it. Not that I have nothing to do, but it's that feeling of unfulfillness. I'm not able to teach my own children things that I was hoping to teach them. And that makes me feel like a total failure. I know that they say that teaching your own children is harder than others. I know, but still, that thought keeps coming back that I won't be able to work in a classroom if I cannot handle my own 2 children. :(

    In addition to that, after going to different classes as a sub, I realized that being a classroom teacher is not for me., at least not at that point. I'm not able to handle a class full of kids by myself. I can only work under some one at this point.

    Anyway, despite all the doubts, I have started to apply to assistant teacher positions. I need to start working in order to get some experience and keep sane :)


    Questions:
    1. If they ask me at the interview how come I have a masters degree but apply for assistant, which only requires school diploma, is that OK to tell them the truth that I'm scared/reluctant to teach?

    2. Are there many places where there are 2 teachers, lead teacher and a second teacher? My son went to a private kindergarden and that's what they had there. I would like to find such places.

    3. If you have any suggestions where else I could apply, (except assistant teacher in private and public schools and daycares), I'd appreciate it.
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Jun 28, 2008

    I am not a mom, but I'd like to say teaching your own children and someone elses is like night and day. You seem to know yourself pretty well as far as what type of job you want, and you know what... that's great. It doesn't make you a failure, and it will probably save you heartache later on. If you were to interview for a position and they did ask why you only want an assistant position, you don't have to say that you are scared, but you could say that your chidlren are still very young and you feel that the responsiblity of having your own classroom would not allow you enough time for your children. You want them to know that your dedication and willingness to work with chidlren is strong and that you'd like to use your strengths in a classroom setting.

    Have you thought about special ed positions. Self- contained or inclusive classrooms usually have one or two aides.

    Good luck and keep us posted
     
  4. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    I would say if you explained in your interview that you would like to gain more experience as an assistant rather than having a classroom of your own, that would be fine.

    Subbing is an experience like no other. Having your own class of students would be different.

    My son doesn't respond to me as a teacher like I wanted him to- that's another reason why I think he benefits from having other teachers year after year.
     
  5. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Jun 29, 2008

    I would give the following reasons for wanting to be an aide:
    *Gain more classroom experience before taking on your own classroom.
    *Knowing that as a mom of two younger aged children you have several at home responsibilities and at this time you cannot give all the extra time you know you would give as a dedicated full time class room teacher.
    *As an aide you get to work with small groups or one on one. Emphasize how much you enjoy this part of teaching.

    As far as two teachers in the classroom I think you'll only find that in a private school. I don't know of any public schools that do that.

    When you're looking at child care centers I suggest you seek out ones that are Keystone Stars participants, at least 3 or 4 stars. Then you know you're at a higher quality center (getting 2 stars is very easy, and nobody from the state actually comes to verify anything, it's just done through paper work. For 3 and 4 stars you have to be observed, do a ton of paper work and it's not nearly as easy). Google PA Keys or Keystone Stars and you should be able to get a listing of participants by county.

    Also, as far as the Masters Degree applying for aide position, public school jobs are so hard to get in PA it might not even surprise them to see you applying. They might worry more about you staying in the position though.
     
  6. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Jun 29, 2008

    thanks for the suggestions, MsMar , very interesting info about 2-4 stars centers
     
  7. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Someone here mentioned that subbing is an experience like no other, and I totally agree. I had so much more control over my class when I did my student teaching then when I subbed. Having your own class affords you the option to switch things around when stuff isn't working. With subbing, you've got 6 hours to "make it work." Keep this in mind when you think about being inadequate with your own class.
     
  8. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    I agree with Pisces Fish and Mable.

    I can teach one of my kids but not the other. It's totally not the same. It's not you, it is a combination of your child and you. The cooperation from the child is not always there and the point at which a parent's frustration level kicks in is much lower. IMO. Don't worry about this.

    I had way more control over my class as a long term sub than as a regular sub. What is neat, is you know when you need to spend more time on something or less time or whatever. You also get to have your rules and know each little personality. Trust me it is way easier as far as classroom management, but tougher as far as all the extra stuff you need to do while the kids aren't there ie, grading, parent emails, blah blah blah.

    As far as trying to be a TA first, certainly you can do that. If asked, don't tell them you are scared or uncomfortable but simply at a point where you are ready to get into the classroom and a TA seems like the logical place to starts since you have not yet had your own classroom.
     
  9. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Might not be a bad idea to tell them you are equally comfortable being led or being the leader.
     
  10. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    An inclusion class that combines special ed children with an IEP and regular ed students is becoming the big thing in education. They usually combine a regular teacher with a special ed teacher and one or two para. you might be interested in doing this,although it is not easy.
    I would not tell them that you are scared to teach. It is difficult to find a teaching job and you might tell them you want to get the experience of working in a classroom in preparation for when you get a job. Regular teaching is nothing like subbing or teaching your own children. Good Luck.
     
  11. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Jun 30, 2008

    OK, I found the list of star participants. But I guess it's not such a popular program, because I couldn't find a few childcares in our area that I've had experience with and are good child cares.
     
  12. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    There's a lot of work involved in being a Stars participant, so yes, some good places choose not to participate. The center I worked at felt it was worth the extra effort though to get the funding and the recognition.
     
  13. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    I had an interview a few days ago and asked the director of the preschool how come I couldn't find their preschool in that list. She explained to me that those Stars don't only depend on what the childcare do, they also depend on some sort of federal grants that the parents receive from the government. That's why, for example, their preschool is not on the list at all, because their participants don't receive enough of those funding.
     
  14. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    That's right, I forgot about that part. I think you need something like 10% of your children to be on subsidized care to qualify for the Stars program.
     

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