Understanding and recognizing double digit numbers

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by WaProvider, Apr 20, 2009.

  1. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Apr 20, 2009

    I have a new 5 in my pre K class that is reading and decoding great. She knows her numbers one - ten and can manipulate items in order to answer addition and subtraction story questions.

    She however, can not understand double digit numbers past 10 and is easily frustrated by them. She is not behind, she can count a great distance orally, and can do other math tasks. This would just be the next logical step-to recognize the double digit numbers-but I am clearly not doing it the right way.

    I am wondering what you do in your classes to facilitate this beyond just memorizing them.
     
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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Apr 20, 2009

    Wa,
    I'm not a preK teacher, so take this for what it is worth. Does she know what a penny and a dime is? If you use dimes for the tens and pennies for the ones, maybe she could picture it more easily (just make sure there are no nickels around to confuse things!)

    Just a thought.
     
  4. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Apr 20, 2009

    Oh, actually she is really good about pennies and dimes. I may try that. Then translating that to written numbers would just mean I add a cent symbol......mmmm....thanks.
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Apr 20, 2009

    Wa,
    I just taught a 5 1/2 year old (who is technically in 1st grade, but who reads on a 6th grade level) how to do double-digit subtraction with regrouping using dimes and pennies. They are so "concrete" at that age.
     
  6. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Apr 23, 2009

    we did do the dimes and pennies.

    We also invented a game that has unifix blocks for ten blocks on the right hand side and single blocks on the left. The children roll dice to find out how many unifix blocks you can move from the basket to the board. Then when you get 10-move it to the 10 strip. Then when you roll again and get your next square you have 10+whatever you rolled. That is a -teen number. So you work up to the twenty mark.

    Did that make sense.

    The decorations around the board are the numbers 1-20 so the children could point to the number.
     
  7. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

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    Apr 25, 2009

    Double digit numbers are very difficult for young children to comprehend. I found that my pre-k's were able to recognize 1-9 very well as well as understand the concept of 1:1, however they usually struggled with double digits. One thing I did that really helped with recognition and recall of double digit #'s was to use Heidi Songs 11-30 CD/DVD, she has really great songs set to familiar tunes along with movements for a multisensory approach. I would use the songs and movements to get the recognition piece and "hook" them first, then we would work with "10 frames" to get the concept of 1:1 with those double digits. The kids really enjoyed the music and movement and that in turn motivated them to want to learn the 1:1 w/ the 10 frames. We would use manipulatives in the 10 frames every day. I would show the frame on the document camera and they would have one of their own and I would say "show me 17" or something and they would have to put 17 manipulatives in their two 10 frames, filling one frame completely and putting 7 in the other.
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Apr 25, 2009

    I agree they are very hard. I didn't imply that I felt these children were behind. Just given where they are this was the next logical step for them in math.

    I am very proud of their devlopment. I re read my origional post and I said they were new 5's. They are, but they were old 4's that turned 5-not children that entered the classroom at 5. Sorry.

    I love the idea of the Heidi songs. you have mentioned them before......I haven't had enough funding for that. she isn't on free u tube somewhere is she-shhhhhh!
     
  9. piggy2009

    piggy2009 Rookie

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    May 9, 2009


    wow. this child must be smart.
     

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