Underappreciated

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by newtothis2006, Feb 23, 2008.

  1. newtothis2006

    newtothis2006 Rookie

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    Feb 23, 2008

    I'm a 1st year resource teacher of 7th and 8th grade Math. I'd like to know how involved other special ed. teachers are with students they case manage. My school has the expecation the case manager is solely accountable for students that are failing. These students are fully capable of grade level work but refuse to turn in their work. They're failing out of laziness. I've gotten their parent involved, mandated tutoring, HW club afterschool, told them to check in with me, fill out their agenda books, and some of them just won't do it. I teach my classes all day. The ones failing I don't have so it's hard to catch them to give them "the talk." Lately my administration has been griping at me that I am not doing enough to case manage. They said I should be chasing down my kids in the morning and afternoon (in a physical sense) to walk them to to tutoring or to their classes to fill in their agenda books. Problem is, I tutor in the mornings and afternoons and don't know how I can be walking 3-5 kids around the school to various rooms and then be in my room tutoring. They won't tell me how it's done, just to get it done. I was told yesterday the person before me was able to do it. I know he didn't spend much time on his teaching, that's how he did it. I guess they wanted me to be more of case manager-pulling kids in my room all day, chasing and escorting everywhere instead of working so hard to teach my kids on-grade level Math. Is there anyone else who does this type of casemanaging with their kids and teaches?? Please give me your ideas, I'm going to try to finish out the year hoping to please them more. Thanks.
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Feb 23, 2008

    Do you have an aide that you could enlist to help track down the failing kids? Could you ask their first/last teachers of the day to send them down to you in the morning/afternoon? I can't imagine admin not being more supportative of you on this.
     
  4. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Feb 23, 2008

    Could you request the homework assignments from the teachers ahead of time so you could create some sort of weekly agenda to send home? (I know teachers usually send homework one night at a time, but this might be helpful for students who were misplacing books, papers, etc) -- Could you create a reference folder that would help students utilize different strategies to complete their homework, with the weekly agenda in the front and a parent signature page? Is there a sign in sheet for the after school tutoring? I would get the parents to be more accountable as well - get them to sign forms that they WILL pick their child up or they ARE aware their child is staying for tutoring, etc. Could you get your students to have peer buddies who help check their homework agendas each day and/or are willing to help them via telephone in the evenings? Would you be willing to help the students finish their assignments during their homeroom or study hall periods? (Thus making them finish their work but not having to deal with the actual "homework"?)

    Just a few ideas...
     
  5. dopey153

    dopey153 Rookie

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    Mar 2, 2008

    Your administration needs to support you. I did the same thing as you did and created an after school homework lab where I required them to complete their work before they can start on any fun activities (this is elementary school). Alot of the students liked the lab because they wanted to socialize after finishing their homework and it seemed like they didn't have a chance to outside of school.

    In high school, it was much harder to get students to do their homework. Usually, if students lack motivation to the level that you just portrayed, parents are not very much help. I put aside all the academic goals and really spent time getting to know my students. Get to know your students first. They will not do anything if they feel you do not connect with them.

    I went through the same thing you did in my first year and this made all the difference. Eventually, I had students staying afterschool on their own initiative and coming in for Saturday tutoring. I took a month or two for me to build this rapport with them though.
     
  6. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    Mar 5, 2008

    I have been told to do this exact same thing. I teach in a combo jr/sr high so I try to do it for the jr. high kids but I will not do it for the high school kids. But I am always held accountable when they are failing. My kids can be absent for 3 days out of the week, not make up all that work, and then it's my fault. So, I run around and case manage all day. I really don't teach. My aide basically runs my classroom. Because we are a combo school I have high stdts during jr. high lunch and I have jr. high stdts during high school lunch so I don't even get a lunch break. The saddest part is it's really the kids that suffer.
     
  7. newtothis2006

    newtothis2006 Rookie

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    Mar 5, 2008

    Boy would it be nice to have an aide. They talked about having the ISS aide help us Resource teachers at the begining of the year but it never materialized. At least they haven't been on my back the last week or so. I have tried to be more visbie and showy with my casemangaging skills. Walking kids around, talking to the AP about an idea for a kid and such. I LOVE to teach these kids and I wish that was all the job was about. Unfortunatley special ed. is going to loose a teacher who is passionate about these kids. I don't want the headache, stress, and pressure of case managing. Next year I'm looking for a general ed. position. I'll always have special needs students in my classes so I won't be totally finished with it. Just the hassle part of it! Hang in there.
     
  8. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    Mar 5, 2008

    I am very lucky to have an aide. That I do know. But I case manage over 40 kids so there is no way I could do that and still be considered a teacher. And just like you, I love working with the kids. My casemanaging is so consuming, it's actually relaxing to work with the students. Sometimes when I am working with a group, my aide will come over and tell me she can do that if I want to go do some paperwork. But I usually tell her no, that working with the students is enjoyable for me. It makes my job worth it. And I can't tell you how many times I have said that if all I had to do was teach and work with the kids, I would have the best job in the world. It just makes me sad and frustrated when I think about it.
     
  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Mar 5, 2008

    I used to be a general ed inclusion teacher (I was the general ed part of the team, along with the special ed teacher.) I ended up with no lunch, endless meetings (I had to be at every meeting the spec ed teacher had), it took all of my planning periods... so I watched as my general ed colleagues had planning and meeting time, while I had to do everything on my own time. I didn't feel a part of my grade level team, because I never managed to meet with them. I was always tied up in special ed meetings, child study meetings, parent meetings, chronic care meetings, etc.

    I was really good at team teaching in an inclusion setting BUT I'll never willingly go back and do it. You don't get one cent more, but you lose all your planning time, constantly have to stay late and come in early for meetings, and have 2 additional teachers to meet with on a regular basis. It just wasn't fair. I'm a big believer in "doing more than the minimum" but it was just too much for me.

    They always seem to do that -- drive the good ones away, until they find someone mediocre who will stay. It is the same everywhere.

    Move on, and don't look back!
     
  10. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Mar 5, 2008

    I totally agree. When I worked with high schoolers, it took me a semester of bonding with them until they respected me and would take ANY guidance.
     

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