Typical job interviews: 3 rounds?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Jerry Dill, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. Jerry Dill

    Jerry Dill Companion

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    Mar 22, 2017

    I am currently interviewing for jobs, and I have encountered several multi-round interview stages. These schools identify a round 1 with 10 + phone interviews; a round 2 with 5 candidates for Skype interviews; and a round 3 for an on-campus visit with teaching demonstration for 3 candidates. When I got my current job, I just interviewed with one person first by telephone then on Skype. I did not visit the campus, nor meet with other faculty/administrators/staff.

    Which is more typical? The lengthy multi-round job interviews with multiple visits or the one interview with one person format? Any advice on interviewing for a lengthy process like this one I am mentioning?
     
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  3. Jerry Dill

    Jerry Dill Companion

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    Mar 22, 2017

    Just to update my own thread:

    Any advice on being an atheist and applying to schools with religious affiliations?
     
  4. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Mar 22, 2017

    I
     
  5. Jerry Dill

    Jerry Dill Companion

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    Mar 23, 2017

    I am leery of working at a Catholic school for the reasons you mentioned. But there are also Episcopalian, Protestant, and Jewish schools, which seem more progressive. At the same time, I feel like I would have to mask who I am at any of these schools. I interviewed at a couple schools with religious affiliations and at one they said they didn't care what was the religion of their teachers, but I only saw Christian-sounding last names among the faculty and staff. I just interviewed at a Jewish school and there are 4 rabbis on the faculty. It seems like religious faith is expected there even if they are more progressive than Catholic schools, so I would have to mask my failure to attend religious services.
     
  6. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 23, 2017

    What is a Christian sounding name?

    I think you will find that most religious schools expect you to be a practicing person of faith, maybe not their religion, but some religion. They would expect you to uphold their moral tenets and instill in your students the values that are part of the mission of the school. If you feel you can't put your views aside, you may not want to look at religious schools.
     
  7. Jerry Dill

    Jerry Dill Companion

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    Mar 23, 2017

    There were no last names like "Abdella" or "Goldstein" or "Bashir" or "Abramov" or "Perlstein." http://www.subvertednation.net/jew-lists/jewish-surnames/
    https://www.familyeducation.com/baby-names/browse-origin/surname/muslim

    I'm a very moral person, and I enforce rules related to cheating, listening, behaving respectfully during classes. But I do not attend any religious institution, and I am not going to talk about a personal relationship with God or how important God is in peoples' lives. I am just wondering at a school with 4 rabbis on the faculty, how often God and attending religious services comes up as a topic for conversation? Or at a school with the word, "Episcopal," in the name, how open the school is to teachers who are Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish, atheist, Bahai, Wicca?
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 23, 2017

    I have to disagree with your premise, based upon personal experience. I don't think a last name defines a person's religious proclivity.

    However, I do agree that the topic of religion will be discussed in any religious school. I agree with you that a religious school would not be a good fit with your personal beliefs. It's a good guess that a personal relationship with God would be paramount in any religious school.

    If you would still like to consider teaching in a private school, you will be able to find an abundance of non-religious private schools out there.
     

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