Type of job by region

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by waterfall, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Sep 16, 2011

    I'm hoping this makes sense, haha. Although I love my school, already the thought of another 8-10 month winter from hell is KILLING me. We got a little snow already today, and it won't let up until May at the absolute earliest. What good is snow without snow days? I don't think I can stay here past this year for my sanity, haha. The problem is, I feel that my type of job is pretty rare in special ed these days. I do an entirely resource/pull-out program for mild/mod. needs, so I'm always teaching my own lessons in my own classroom rather than having to follow the the kids to the gen ed room in a full inclusion program. Inclusion or push-in teaching is just not for me- I've done it a lot in the past through my college programs and always hated it. So what I'm wondering is, do any of you live in specific regions or states where they actually have full resource/pull out models? The reason I ask is that everywhere I looked in my home state, they were all full inclusion or very heavily push-in/inclusion. However, everywhere out here takes the opposite approach and believes that pull-out is more effective, so in that way it seems to me it somewhat based on region, if that makes sense? I'm looking to apply early for licenses in other states (knowing how long it took to get this state's license) so I can end up with both a job and a region I'm happy with. So right now, I'm sort of deciding which states I want to go for- and it would help to know which ones might have more jobs of the type I'd be interested in.
     
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  3. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Sep 17, 2011

    It depends upon the school in my district. We do mostly inclusion, but the other school in our complex has switched to pullout. They have more students who need that service; we have more students who can handle inclusion. We've actually had to transfer a few of our students over to the other school because inclusion is to big a stretch for them.
     
  4. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Sep 17, 2011

    Are you absolutely opposed to being a self-contained teacher? I know there tend to be more of those jobs available here. Although you would still have long winters to contend with. Ha.

    When I taught in TX, resource was pullout. In MO, it was push in. In my current district in MN, it tends to be a combination of both, and I've been in 3 schools here. The plan this year is to have an hour for each grade level of blocked reading where all the interventionists (SPED, ELL, GT, etc.) all go to that grade level and teach at the same time. I am sure there will probably wind up being some of each.

    Idk, I have less resource experience than sc, but imo, there are and ALWAYS WILL BE kids that can handle and do well with push in and kids that need the pullout. So maybe if you're willing to accept a combination approach you'd have more options, even if it isn't exactly your first choice preference?

    I hear you on the winter thing. I'd move to Florida in a heartbeat if it weren't so darned far away from everyone I love!
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Sep 17, 2011

    @Bethechange- Yup, definitely opposed to self-contained. It's just not something I'm at all qualiied for or interested in. I did a cognitive needs program this summer, and for a little summer job it was nice, especially since the pay was high and the hours were great (4 hours a day, 3 days a week), but I would be miserable doing something like that as my full time job all year. It's not my first choice, but if I really liked the school and the area I would be willing to look into a combo program, depending on how much pull-out and push-in there was. When I first got here last year, the previous teacher had put a few push-in hours on the IEPs, and of course I had to follow that. I had to schedule about an hour a day of push-in, and I even hated that. I absolutely dreaded that hour, and I couldn't help thinking of all the useful things I could be doing instead. Luckily my principal agreed with me and supported me taking all the push-in hours off the IEPs as they came up. If I'm in a wonderful sunny location though, maybe that will make up for doing a little push-in. It's really hard because I think I'm not going to be able to find some of the things I love about this job at another school- I'm afraid I'm constantly going to be thinking that I miss this school/whatever is going on at the new school wouldn't have happened at my current school. However, if I'm miserable living here...that's no good either.
     

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