TV in the classroom?

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by puff5655, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Just wondering what everyone here thinks of it, and if they use TV's in their classrooms!

    Personally, I'm against it (they get too much at home already!) but every pre-k classroom that I've student taught or tutored in uses their TV at least once a week.
     
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  3. PB&J

    PB&J Rookie

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    I think if you are showing a video that enhances learning it's not bad. Like if you are learning about the Rain Forest and obviously can't get the hands on field trip then it's okay. How else could you really show the kids what the animals look, sound, and act like? I do think just popping in a video that is irrelevent is overused in some places, as well as "stretching" the concept. For example, learning about friendship so you use a video of The Rainbow Fish when you really could get everything from the book. Just my opinion!
     
  4. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Being at home, I let the kids watch one 30 minute show while I make lunch. I allow them to play with quite toys at the time too so kids who want to watch can hear but they can have a choice, but usually they don't because they just come in from being outside for 45 minutes at that time.

    When I ran the daycare outside of my home, I made it mandatory for staff to get approval in order to use the tv, AND it had to be something related to what they were teaching. Not only that, but they were also only allowed to use it one time a week. It also could not be a long movie (like a Disney movie). The kids don't need to sit for two hours watching the tv.
     
  5. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    I teach preschool special ed and we have a 30 minute video time slot where they watch an educational video. It might be one on letter sounds, stories like "Where the Wild Things Are" and other Scholastic books on videos, sign language, Sesame Street, etc.

    To me it is another way to facilitate learning. Some get it through circle time, some get it through table time, some get it one-on-one, some get it through songs, others get it through video.

    Lori
     
  6. MrsMikesell

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    I swear by "Between The Lions".

    I show an episode ever day during our 30 minute "nap" in Kindergarten.

    They have learned so much from it.

    Kelly :)
     
  7. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    MrsMikesell.........do you have that on tapes, or is it on your PBS station? I would love to get my hands on that show.
     
  8. diro.pams

    diro.pams Companion

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  9. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I work in a daycare. Many years ago, too many of the teachers were using t.v often. They took all of them out of the center...except mine. I told them I wanted to keep it for occasional use...for PBS. It can be an effective learning tool. I rarely use it though.
     
  10. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I love the LeapFrog videos they have out. One of my preschoolers learned her alphabet from watching the Letter Factory one, and all of my kids adore them.
     
  11. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    When I was a stay at home mom, my own kids watched Sesame Street every single day, fell asleep to Mr. Rogers, and other learning shows at various times. They learned an awful lot from them. They never went to Preschool or daycare.
     
  12. MrsMikesell

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    My school purchased a set of "Between the Lions". I would check the PBS site and see if you can order them there.

    Kelly :)
     
  13. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I've heard of them and I am very curious to know more about Between The Lions. I'll have to look into that show. I've heard really good things about it.
     
  14. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    For my own personal kids, I adore Between the Lions! On the PBS website, there are also a bunch of games/printables that you can use with your kids.

    As a teacher, I use very little TV (maybe 3 times a year?). I teach in a half day PK program and am strapped for time as it is. If I had a whole day program, I may allow TV more often, but I agree with what someone else said, they get more than enough TV at home. School should be primarily for things that they can't/don't get at home.
    Kim
     
  15. MrsMikesell

    MrsMikesell Cohort

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    Between The Lions

    They only play it here during school hours on PBS.

    I love to have it on during our mandated 30 minute nap. Kids that want to sleep, sleep. Kids that don't want to sleep, lay queitly and learn! :)

    Anyways, I can 100% guarantee my students would not be watching this at home. They are way too busy watching the latest videos, playing "Grand Theft Auto", and watching "R" rated movies. It's a sad, sad thing when the only time children can be children is a few hours a day at school. :(

    Kelly :)
     
  16. MrsMikesell

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  17. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

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    We have no TV in the classroom, and being that it's a private school, one of the conditions for acceptance is that the parent signs a form saying they have no TV in the home. (A VCR is ok, just not a TV.) The only way to watch videos is to reserve the auditorium/lunchroom in advance, and use the projector. That makes it very hard to show videos, but it also makes you think twice, because you can't get it very often!
     
  18. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Daily TV seems like a bit much- yeah, there is educational stuff on the Tv but kids really get sooooo much TV oustside of school (educational or not) that it seems there are other ways to present info in schools. How about classical music during nap time and encouraging kids to make pictures in their minds....Between the Lions is about books much like Reading Rainbow- give me a good read aloud anyday. This is not to say that there is no space for tv or lessons involving vidoes- I just think daily doses of TV at school is a bit much-
     
  19. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Am I reading this right...they can't have a tv in the home? How is that even possible? I'd be a bit taken aback as a parent and a bit upset. That is a personal right for anyone to have a tv in their own home. What kind of school is this?
     
  20. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 23, 2006

    How can you have a VCR with no TV???:confused:
     
  21. NELNaples

    NELNaples Rookie

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    As a subsititute I start to panic if there is no TV in the room. Mostly I use it for when students get done projects at different time. As a sub, I can't really focus on helping one students without the rest taking advantage - this way I can help the ones that take longer and the rest drift over to the carpet to watch whatever is on.

    Also, I have had a few rooms with half-done lesson plans and they had just moved back in the classroom so nothing was there - Hello Nick Jr!
     
  22. NELNaples

    NELNaples Rookie

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    Umm also, the no TV in the home is crazy. If it was out of hand I could understand but as a child (and adult) with ADD that is the only way I can concentrate - it helps me focus on what I am doing.
     
  23. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    During my lessons, when some kids finish earlier than others, I let them sit on the rug and read books while I help the others :)

    The reason I brought up the TV in the classroom was partly because I am doing a research paper on kids and tv for my english comp class. I'll post it here if anyone cares to read it.. what I found is actually really interesting (and SCARY!) lol (I left out the intro paragraph) :

    One of the biggest problems with too much TV is that it has been directly correlated with childhood obesity, a problem so major now that it has been declared an epidemic. In fact, “a third of U.S. children and teens — about 25 million kids — are either overweight or on the brink of becoming so, the highest number ever recorded, according to a recent government survey,” There are several health concerns- children that are overweight will be at a higher risk later on for cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes- which is now at an all-time high among children. There are many other contributing factors, but children often develop a behavior of snacking while watching television, and each minute a child spends in front of the screen, is another minute they might have otherwise spent getting involved in a physical activity.

    It has also been discovered that TV can have a detrimental effect on brain development. The “guidelines” provided by the American Pediatrics Association say that children under the age of 2 should have no “screen time” at all. The TV can get in the way of exploring their surroundings and spending time with other children, parents, and other caregivers - necessary for developing crucial skills that will allow them to “grow cognitively, physically, socially, and emotionally.”

    Excessive television watching for toddlers may also lead to Attention Deficit Disorder later in life. This may seem farfetched, but it makes sense. The theory is that the pace of television is sped up, and the scenes shifting so quickly become normal to the child. The theory is still just that, but we do know that ADHD has increased dramatically over the past fifty years, and in a small study done with about three thousand children, it was found that a toddler watching three hours of infant television daily had “nearly a thirty percent higher chance of having attention problems in school (than those that watched no television).”

    Another big worry is the violence on television. When a child witnesses violent events on TV, such as kidnapping or murder- even just in cartoon form- it may cause him or her to believe the world is scary and that something bad might happen to them. Children can actually be traumatized by events or “monsters” they see on television. Until they are at least seven years old, they cannot yet completely distinguish between fantasy and reality, so simply telling them something isn’t real won’t console them.

    On the opposite end, violence in cartoons is often portrayed as being fun and an effective way to get what you want. Children emulate the “good guy” of the program, and learn through the program that it is alright to hit, punch, and use other violent acts to get your way- as long as you think that you are the “good guy.”

    Unfortunately, although it is widely known that television does not do much good for children, seventy percent of child care centers admit to use a TV during a typical day, and “twenty-six percent of US children younger than age two have a TV in their bedrooms - often watched from the crib.” TV has become a modern day babysitter for children, and habits like this might be hard to break, but every set does in fact have an ‘off’ switch- all parents have to do is press the button.
     
  24. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I like reading research, but I tend to not believe a good chunk of it. Research is done on everything now a days and later on it changes 10 years later, and then the whole world gets worried over stupid things. When the tv becomes a babysitter, then yes, it becomes a problem, but tv for entertainment and fun, used in moderation is not bad in my opinion. I'm pretty confident that my children are not going to get obese or become less intelligent just because they watch a 30 minute educational television show at my home. ;)

    The children who become obese probably are not involved in "any" activity and eat at McDonald's frequently, and the children who do not display proper age appropriate intelligence probably are not around any kind of educational environment...it's easier for researchers just to "blame a tv" in my opinion instead of blaming the parents for overusing the tv and other things that "make life easier".
     
  25. MorahMe

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    Ok, here are my responses:
    Jen: yes, it is a personal right. However, being a private, religious school, in a more insulated community, they have the right to expect parents to follow school guidelines. Noone is forcing anyone to throw out their TV, they can go to a different school if they choose.

    czacza: any electronics store can sell you a moniter, video hookup, and remote without TV.

    I'm not telling anyone what to do, and this is only my opinion, and that of the majority of the community in which I live. However, if we are all completely honest with ourselves, it's very easy to get carried away with watching TV, and hard to moniter what children see. No, there is nothing wrong with watching a half hour of an educational program daily, Jen. But why does it have to be television? Can't we buy educational videos? Share a set with your neighbors so noone gets bored of watching the same ones over and over!
     
  26. PB&J

    PB&J Rookie

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    Not trying to start anything here, but what would be the difference between educational tv and video? Same thing in my mind. I can buy a Blues Clues video for $15 or watch it for free on tv.
     
  27. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    My question is this: what is the difference if my kids watch Sesame Street on TV or if it's on a video? I'm not trying to spark a debate, but it really doesn't make sense to say that an educational video is better than an educational show on television. Many educational TV shows are on video. We can't simply say that because a program is on TV that it has a stigma attached to it. Videos "are" the same as tv, the only difference is that you can go back and rewind it and watch it again...a little more dangerous as well if you ask me! You can't ever guarantee that there will be something on TV to watch, but with videos they are always there no matter what you do. Know what I mean?

    I can understand it being a school guideline, and if people want to follow it, more power to them, but I personally think that's taking it a bit too far.
     
  28. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    PB&J, Only a few minutes behind yours! We were thinking the same thing.
     
  29. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I'm still a little confused. What is the schools premises for not allowing T.V.'s at home? Are they not allowed to have internet connections either, because you can get worse stuff off of it than on a t.v. Students need to know about different resources (t.v., newspaper, internet, etc.), but it should be the parents responsibility to set guidelines and control what their children watch.

    I was reading post #22 and thought most of the same things as stated above. I was a fat child (shocker!), but did not watch much t.v. and was very active. I know that sounds strange but it's true. I watch much less t.v. now, and am not as active...but that's another topic.
     
  30. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

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    The difference is, if it's on video, there is no changing the channel. That's a big advantage to me!
     
  31. 4Lisa

    4Lisa Rookie

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    I work in a preschool with 3-5 yr olds, and when I first started they used to watch a movie every other Friday. I thought it was OK sometimes especially in the long winter months here in central New York State. But I did away with it just for the reason that the kids simply watch tooooo much TV at home!!! Some of the children are just TV junkies and it is so sad. But I don't have anything against it for educational purposes!! :)
     
  32. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    But you can put parental controls on to limit the channels you approve of.
     
  33. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

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    How many kids do you know who haven't figured out how to get past parental controls on everything?!
     
  34. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Not any preschool age kids that I know of know how to get past those controls, maybe older kids, but not young children.
     
  35. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

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    True, but why put the bait of having a TV in front of their noses, and having them grow up knowing TV is ok? The price of buying a bunch of videos, especially if you get them on sale, is a lot cheaper than buying a full fledged TV!
     
  36. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I'm still wondering about my questions in post #28.
     
  37. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Me too.

    You know, I've known many people who raise their children without a tv in their home. And that is totally cool with me! More power to you! HOWEVER, I do not think it is fair to judge anyone for using a tv or letting their child watch a tv, and having one in their home. Are there people who let it become the babysitter? Yes, and THOSE are the ones that need to wake up and become responsible parents. But I am a responsible parent who controls what my child watches and how often.
     
  38. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Actually those videos do become pricy, and you can get t.v.'s for pretty cheap (especially if they're on sale). Don't get me wrong. There is not a t.v. in my classroom. When I do want to show a video it's a hassel to get one in here (I'm in a modular). I would never want a cable connection in my classroom, because I would have no use for it. I just think it is not up to us (no matter if we're public or private) to decide for parents if they should have a t.v. in their house or not. If you're going to ban them, then you should also ban them from having an internet connection or getting a newspaper at home (for those students who can read). Sorry, but you're going to find the same things there too.
     
  39. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

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    The rule about internet connection in the home is that it may be used for bussiness purposes only, and kept in a locked room that children have no access to. This is a guideline set by many of our community's leaders, due to the many dangers, and yes, divorces in many families due to theses dangers, and most of the people in our community adhere to it. If a student had to do a report and brought in the internet as a source, it would not be accepted.

    The school, and most of the community, feel that the dangers of having a television, and the internet, are greater than the benefits. I think I'm very well educated, without having a television or the internet at home.
     
  40. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    And no one is saying that you're not. But don't you think that we should help teach them the proper uses of those things, instead of putting them in a bubble?
     
  41. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    nmk, is this a community that all practices the same faith? I am merely curious about what religion this is.........of course don't feel like you have to answer as I'm just being nosey and have absolutely nothing to add to this conversation. If that is part of your faith I absolutely respect that. I imagine that if this is part of your religious faith, then that policy is no big deal to the parents who send their kids to that school.
     

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