Tutoring Program Question

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by pi lover, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. pi lover

    pi lover Rookie

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    Sep 27, 2006

    Our school has a tutoring program established for our 7-12 grade students. Teachers may assign a student to stay after school from 3-4 on any day from Monday to Thursday. We have teachers who volunteer to always take Monday, or Tuesday, etc. There are various problems that we always run into every year. Sometimes a student gets assigned to stay after school from a couple of teachers due to not turning in work. It turns out to be a punishment instead of actual tutoring time. The history teacher may not be able to tutor in math, etc. I teach math and I like to tutor my own kids, but sometimes they are already having to stay in someone else's room who may not be able to help them on math, too. Does anyone have a program in place that seems to work well? I give a lot of time after school to my students who want help, but I find I'm fighting a losing battle when students have to stay in other rooms because of other classwork--but they are not actually getting help on that work. They're still out there on their own!
     
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  3. katrinkit

    katrinkit Comrade

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    Sep 28, 2006

    We had each subject take a day. Math was Monday, English/Reading was Tuesday, so on and so forth. Each teacher for the specific subject was asked to stay until 4 or 5 on that day. Some teachers also offered help on other days, but no one was ever forced to stay.
     
  4. pi lover

    pi lover Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2006

    That's a good idea, but I doubt it would work in our small school. Neither of our history teachers (one from Jr. High and one from high school) are able to do tutoring after school. One of them is a coach and one is taking night classes. History might be the easiest thing for non-history teachers to tutor in though. I'm going to keep this idea in mind. I wish I had only math students in the room when I'm trying to help the kids. The kids that are in there to catch up on English, for example, will not tell me exactly what they are supposed to do and so they basically do what they want anyway as far as homework goes. The other teachers don't share with us what the students are supposed to do, so we just have to take the kids' word for it. There's got to be a better way to organize this tutoring program. Any other ideas out there?
     

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