Turner Syndrome

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by rchlkay, Aug 12, 2007.

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  1. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

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    Aug 12, 2007

    Is anyone familiar with Turner Syndrome? I'm going to have a girl who is diagnosed with this in my class this year and was wondering what experiences or information people might have for me. I've done some research and think I've got the basics but wondered what else I could learn.
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Aug 12, 2007

    I've read that while most of the symptoms seem to be related to health... these girls usually have problems with math and visual skills. Hearing difficulties are also common.
     
  4. rburb

    rburb New Member

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    Aug 13, 2007

    I had a student for the last few years with Turner's. She had a "different" shaped body (muscular), hearing problems, heart problems, and also had trouble with hormone levels. She had to take shots to correct this. Her mom told me that they are also sterile. She is a great kid and no one knew that she was "different."
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 15, 2007

    A good friend has a daughter with Turner's. The physical attributes are short stature, a 'webbed' or thick neck, and I think something to do with hands and feet. They often have hearing sensitivities, possible heart problems, don't mature normally sexually, may have other sensitivities (touch), life-span is shorter than average, they are infertile. There is usually no correlation with IQ. My friend's daughter is extremely bright.

    Social issues will depend upon the environment, peers, emotional strength of the child.
     
  6. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

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    Aug 16, 2007

    From what I've read in her IEP, she has a lot of social difficulties and suffers from severe anxiety. This doesn't really surprise me after reading some of the research. Thanks for the replies and I'll keep reading up on it!
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 28, 2007

    I think that it was perfectly appropriate for you to post here-you obviously have great insight.
     
  8. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

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    Aug 28, 2007

    I'm sorry I haven't responded, but I've been very busy with all of the other aspects of getting started in the school year. I just officially started seeing students this week and as you can imagine, I've been creating schedules, reading IEP's, and meeting with various people to solve the beginning year issues. I've only had a chance to really sit down and talk to this student twice now and I've spoken with her parents several times. I've scheduled a conference with the student' parents, psychiatrist, and medical doctor within the next six weeks. I assure you that I'm not making any assumptions about this student, any more so than I'm making assumptions about any of my other students. I'm sorry if I offended you by not responding to your message immediately and I appreciate your offer for assistance.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 30, 2007

    Good point KinderABC--we do often tend to focus on what we can see or on how we observe a child's differences; we sometimes lose sight of the educational impact or implications. (This was brought to the forefront for me today as our Special Ed team was doing some planning for the year)
     
  10. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    As teachers, we want to help students feel comfortable in the classroom and with their peer groups. I felt that certain characteristics were important to note. I know that when I first met a young child with Turner's, I was surprised at the physical appearance. Students in a class might not be mature enough to welcome the child in question with respect. I would want to be prepared for that situation.

    When a dwarf student visited my class, I certainly appreciated knowing beforehand about her stature. (I was very proud of our students. She said that of all the schools she visited, ours was the only one where students weren't rude and, in fact, openly welcomed her.)
     
  11. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Aug 30, 2007

    KinderABC, does Turner's syndrome only affect females? I have never heard about it until I came across this post. And every post has said 'girls'. And do you know why this is?
     
  12. GardenDove

    GardenDove Habitué

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    Aug 31, 2007

    I hadn't heard about this syndrome and found the physical description provided informative. There is a lot of good info online, just google. One in 2,500 females have this chromosomal abnormality according to Wikepedia. These people are prone to a vast array of health problems.
     
  13. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I think in our society, we are so stuck on what's on the outside that it's hard to look past any physical differences. Do I agree with this? Certainly not, but its a fact. I know there are children and adults out there that have cerebal palsey, muscular distrophy(sp?), and other maladies that affect their bodies, but not their minds.

    But I also believe that some physical differences might affect the way a child learns. And teachers need to be aware of those so that they might start making modifications.
     
  14. wvsasha

    wvsasha Companion

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    Aug 31, 2007

    I deleted my earlier post because I agreed with KINDER that several of our posts (mine included) were rather stereotypical in nature. I hope to improve on that for future posts and apologize if it was taken to be mean or uniformed.

    However, I believe that an understanding of the physical characteristics can help the teacher better understand where the student is coming from in the type and scope of questions that are asked. It also will help the teacher prepare the classroom for any needs the child would have - either the physical space of the classroom or the atmosphere in being prepared for reactions from other students and parents.

    We're not just a bunch of mean gossips sitting around the teacher lounge.
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 31, 2007

    KinderABC--many years ago I taught a little girl with Turner's Syndrome when she was in nursery school. At that time, there were some concerns with her heart--are heart abnormalities sometimes associated with the syndrome or would that have been a separate concern. She was a delightful little girl, socially she seemed quite advanced and adept, but much of her social interaction was "parroting"--she would repeat phrases and mannerisms that she had observed. Part of her program involved working on appropriate social interactions--her parents had been told that this would need to be an area of focus for her in the future. As she was so young, only 3, it was hard to know what was associated with Turner's and what may be "something else". Are difficulties with social interactions typical of children with Turner's Syndrome?
     
  16. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Thanks for the info...she was so young (only 3 and a half) and had some physical challenges not associated with Turner's--at the time it wasn't clear what "category" things fell into.

    (She was a really loveable little girl and her mother and I became quite good friends--in fact, my daughter was named with her in mind.)
     
  17. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

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    Aug 31, 2007

    KinderABC--please do not take anything that I ask or say personal; I would never try to offend you in any way. However, I can see how some of my questions could be offensive and please know that I'm simply trying to understand my student. (I HOPE everyone would agree that that should be our first priority; I really just want to do what's best for this child and this forum is a great way for me to gain some insight)

    I completely agree that at times we stereotype students as to physical characteristics when we are discussing students with specific physical disabilities and health impairments. However, I did find it helpful to hear from other people's observations. If my student did have physical characteristics that made her stand out, I would appreciate the information so I could answer questions from other students. Elementary school can be such a challenge and children are curious. They (and I'm thinking of my personal special ed students) will not hesitate to ask why "Jane" looks the way she does. If this were to happen, I would like to be able answer.

    Does this impact the child's education? No, not if we are thinking about learning to read and write and solve math problems. However, much of what we teach (especially in special ed) concerns social skills, learning to accept each other for who we are and to appreciate our differences. If my student had an obvious physical difference from the other students, this would be important to teach and understand.

    My particular student does not have any obvious physical differences from her peers. She is very small and I don't mean height. Since she is young, she is not much shorter than the other students. However, she does have issues with eating which has resulted in her being underweight. KinderABC-do you know if it is "typical" of an individual with Turner's to have dietary difficulty? She eats very little and is extremely picky. It could very easily be something she grows out of. Right now though, we're implementing a food therapy program. (No idea what this entails, I was just informed about it this morning; I'm meeting with her parents again on Tuesday.)

    My second question is that I have read that many individuals have difficulty with math. My student does as well and I'm still working on figuring out exactly how to help her. She is also having problems with her handwriting; she has a lot of spatial issues. Is this something that you also had difficulty with?

    As I mentioned before, I'm really just trying to understand my student so any advice or information is appreciated. Thanks!
     
  18. 1stGradeRocks

    1stGradeRocks Comrade

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    Aug 31, 2007

    Nevermind - I sent you a PM
     
  19. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    "
    I first saw the child when she was an infant just home from the hospital. Her physical characteristics were different from those of most infants and very apparent. I was friends with her mother for quite a few years and watched her grow up. The physical characteristics stayed pronounced. The child was a tough cookie, very smart, quite an individual and rather precocious.
     
  20. GardenDove

    GardenDove Habitué

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    I am particularly interested in the physical presentations of medical conditions because, as a nurse, we use this information to assess our patients. There's no need to be offended, I really think this is misplaced. No one here means disrespect I'm sure. For me this is informative. Now if I see someone with this appearance I will know more, and knowledge is a good thing.

    As a nurse I am always doing visual assessments on people I see in public, looking for signs and symptoms of various ailments. I include that in my people watching.
     
  21. 1stGradeRocks

    1stGradeRocks Comrade

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    "As a nurse I am always doing visual assessments on people I see in public, looking for signs and symptoms of various ailments. I include that in my people watching. Now if I see someone with this appearance I will know more, and knowledge is a good thing"

    Wow - it's kind of creepy and scary to think that strangers on the street could be looking at me that intently and evaluating if something is wrong with me. The information I have given was definitely not intended for people to be judging strangers and people they meet to see if they meet the criteria for Turner's. I would not have posted anything if I knew someone would use it like that.
     
  22. GardenDove

    GardenDove Habitué

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    Sep 1, 2007

    The info you gave is most likely readily available in books or online. Yes, medical people do automatically assess people they see. I went to a folk life festival with a Doctor friend of mine and we did exchange a few comments back and forth about some people we saw there, speculating on their medical conditions.
     
  23. GardenDove

    GardenDove Habitué

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    Sep 1, 2007

    Obviously you are bound and determined to be offended. Good luck to you and have a nice day. :angel:
     
  24. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 1, 2007

    This thread has become insulting and combative so I am closing it.
     
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