TRYING to teach numerical order. Help!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ZoomZoomZOOM, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Oct 23, 2008

    I'm trying to teach students numerical order and they don't seem to be grasping it. I begin by showing them a number line, 1-10. I tell them 1 is smallest or least and 10 is biggest or most. I stress my point by asking Q's like, "how many M&M's would you rather have? 1 or 10?" and they can usually answer me correctly. But then when I write three numbers on a sheet of paper, they get confused. Even when I show them the number line. :help:
     
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  3. trina

    trina Companion

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    Oct 23, 2008

    I tutor a child from another school who is VERRRRRRRRY behind due to prolific ADHD that has just now been addressed. She is a 6th grader who cannot put numbers in order. I've done the following: Draw a door on the left and then a line extending from the door to the right, like the floor. Then explain that the "little" kids get in line first to go out to play. The "big" kids go last. I even practice by writing the numbers different sizes as I "line them up" on the number line (floor). I'll write a tiny 1, then a 2 that's a bit larger, and so forth. The next time we visit this topic, I'll make the numbers on cardstock in the sizes and have her put them in order. This way I have the visual influence of the numbers to help guide her. Small number, short card, larger number, taller card. When she "lines up the kids" she has put the numbers in order least to greatest. The next step was to only give her a couple of the number cards, because then she had to deal with having "skips" in the sizes and numbers. And I keep repeating door on the left, line up! Little kids first...small numbers first. Big kids in back...larger numbers to the right.

    I hope this helps
     
  4. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Oct 23, 2008

    Can you have them work first with matching things on the number line?

    For example have one number line on their desk. Cut up a second number line of a different color. Give them 2-3 numbers, have them put them on top of their matching number.

    Maybe play missing number and leave some numbers off the number line.

    How about ordering 1-10 cards, then having one missing and have them leave a space for that number. Gradually have more missing and then squish the numbers together.
     
  5. xmasqueen

    xmasqueen Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2008

    It really depends on the student's real abilities...are they sure it's only ADHD or is there something else going on there. Doesn't sound like an ADHD thing for a 6th grader to be that far behind. Perhaps it's something like Dyscalcula where a student just doesn't recognize numbers in order. I've had plenty of ADHD kids and while some have trouble staying focused but, there's none been to that extreme. However I have had kids with Dyscalcula that have that problem and it is very hard to help them with a number line on their desk and/or a calculator. I sure hope her IEP or IAP has calculator assistance on it. How about playing a game like candyland with her and everytime she counts the number of spaces to move she has to place that number in the proper place on the number line. That might help give her a visual cue to remember the numbers.
     
  6. maroki

    maroki Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2008

    Maybe numbers 1-10 are too much for them to grasp at one time. Start with 1-3 or 1-5 and once they get the idea (and the first few numbers), try expanding it to 10.

    I also have cards with the numbers on the top and underneath the number it has the appropriate number of sticker dots. My students match up manipulatives (usually colores squares) and cover the sticker dots. We usually put the numbers in order first (1-3, 1-5, etc.) and then they match up the manipulatives with the dots.
     
  7. trina

    trina Companion

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    Oct 23, 2008

    Xmasqueen,

    I DO think there's more than ADHD, however, since I only had the required Intro to Special Ed when I was in school, I am in no place to make a judgment call. I am going from what mom told me, and that last spring she was diagnosed ADHD, started on meds, and has made good progress since, but is still very behind. She is in a self-contained ADD/ADHD classroom with a full time SPED teacher. That fact alone worries me. In our state, they mainstream to the nth degree, so the fact that she's been pulled out of the classroom tells me her deficiencies are severe.

    Honestly, I think there's MR there. Just a gut feeling. The first time I met this child, I walked her to the bathroom. She watched me put my hand under the automatic soap dispenser and wash my hands. She then did the same, but she put her hand under it twice. I told her that one squirt was enough and not to do that again. She stared at me smiling (somewhat defiantly?) while putting her hand under it for a third squirt. That's when I knew there's something else going on with this kid.

    But anyway, I feel like a I have a good rapport with her, mom seems pleased, and she says that she is seeing an impact on her schoolwork since I've been tutoring her. I just feel at a loss sometimes. This kid literally finger counts problems like 4+1 and 2+2 by putting up her fingers and then touching each one to her chin while counting. If the sum is over 10 she gets flustered because she runs out of fingers. I am teaching her to start at the highest number, say it aloud, and then finger count. Or she'll draw sticks and count them all. You won't believe what she has to do for multiplication.:dizzy:
     
  8. Iteach782

    Iteach782 Comrade

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    Oct 24, 2008

    Since they seem to understand the concept with m&m's, why not keep working with that or any other candy. Because the concept is so difficult for these kids, maybe you should work with the m&m's for the whole week. Show them 1 m&m, 2 m&ms...and so on. I'm sure they will understand that 10 m&m's is greater. Then, the following week try putting the numbers up on the board with a drawing of m&m's to match the numbers. Write 1 w/ 1 m&m above the number, 2 w/ 2 m&ms above the number, and so on.... Then slowly take away the m&ms and use only the numbers.
     
  9. xmasqueen

    xmasqueen Rookie

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    Oct 24, 2008

    Oh yeah I would. :lol: We had a math meeting today for all grade levels to try and close some gaps and to come up with strategies that we can use at all grade levels to help the next level while still teaching our level expectations. That was one of my main concerns with 1st and 2nd grade teachers, my student's still counting on those fingers. Sorry but multiplication facts can't be done quickly using those fingers although there are tricks they can use. I asked them just to please discourage them from doing that and to learn their facts so that we can move on and not worry so much about it. So I can understand where your coming from.
     
  10. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Oct 25, 2008

    :thumb: Thanks for all the ideas, gang. YOU ROCK!! Now I feel like I have a few ideas to work with. I was really starting to bang my head on the proverbial brick wall there for a sec. :dizzy:
     

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