Trying to pass the FTCE k-6 and the math section is killing me. Please send HELP!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by TeachesAndCanDo., Jun 10, 2019.

  1. TeachesAndCanDo.

    TeachesAndCanDo. New Member

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    Jun 10, 2019

    I really want to be an elementary teacher but the math section is hard. I've only been doing practice test since I am very scared to pay for the test more than 3 times. I am using The Test Camp and it helps but I am still not grasping the math. Please help me.
     
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  3. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jun 10, 2019

  4. showmelady

    showmelady Companion

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    Jun 25, 2019

    Is the example really comparable to the actual test?
     
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jun 25, 2019

    So I’ve heard.
     
  6. fallenshadow

    fallenshadow Rookie

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    Jun 26, 2019

    Copy the problems down handwritten. Justify each step in as simple wording as possible. Find out WHY you made each mistake if possible.
     
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  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jun 27, 2019

    If FTCE K-6 math runs to type, some questions will be comparably difficult, some will appear easier, and a few may be harder. It can be useful to think about how your approach to simpler questions can be generalized to deal with harder ones. It can be useful to walk through the question verbally:

    Okay, 6 is equal to the quotient minus 154. That's 6 = quotient - 154.
    What the heck is a quotient?... Oh, yeah: it's the answer to a division problem.
    And the number that Carmen is thinking of - I'm gonna call it x, because everyone else does, though I could just as well call it c - is being divided by 5, so 5 must be the divisor, or the denominator if I want to do this as a fraction, so "the quotient" means x/5.
    So then 6 = x/5 - 154.
    Now let's get rid of -154 by adding 154 to both sides of the equation: 160 = x/5.
    And now I know that the answer can't be either A or D, because x/5 is equal to a whole number, which means that x has to be evenly divisible by 5, and the only numbers that are evenly divisible by 5 end in either 5 or 0. But, dang, that leaves two possible answers, so I actually have to do the rest of the math.
    So get rid of divided-by-5 by multiplying both sides by 5: 160•5 = x. It's easy on the calculator: 160•5 = 800. If I don't have a calculator, I can use mental math: 5 is one-half of 10, so I can divide 160 by 2 - that's 80 - and then multiply by 10, and that's 800.

    (From where I sit, the single hardest part of this question is that in the thumbnail that I first saw above, the instructor's squiggles obscured a digit, which made 154 look like 54 to me. Boy, did that ever not work.)
     
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