True!

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by pwhatley, Jul 24, 2013.

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  1. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Jul 24, 2013

    Too bad people don't think it is true...
     
  4. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    That's because it isn't even close to true.

    My contracted hours are 8:30 to 3:30 which is not 8 hours and even includes a lunch. I get there at 8 by choice, admittedly and often stay until 4. That pushes me to a full 8 hour day. Parent conferences and all grading takes place during these hours. I do not take work home. Ever. Do I plan at home? Yes, only because I enjoy it.

    My entire summer is mine. Every few years I am offered the chance to go on an expenses paid training at a beautiful resort in San Diego.

    I am incredibly well paid for what I get to do.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Then more power to you rockguykev - you are one of the lucky few!
     
  6. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Yes, really. I am definitely NOT well paid, particularly given the population I teach.
     
  7. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    "Fantasyland" must be a great place to visit! :cool:

    Yes, the numbers on that graphic are pretty accurate.
     
  8. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I tend to agree. I am happy with my standard of living. I have no desire to look for a new job.

    While I do take work home, I ONLY take work home because I enjoy it. I enjoy planning, taking PD, reading "teacher" texts.

    So I may technically work many hours, most of the time it feels like I am hardly working at all.
     
  9. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I disagree that they are accurate. I work usually from 7-3:30 with half an hour for lunch. Our contracted hours are 7:45-3:10. I don't take work home. I also know few people who are REQUIRED to go back a month before students. We go back two days before our students. Most around here go back no earlier than 1 week before students.

    On the other end, it takes WAY longer than 3 weeks to plan my curriculum!

    I make approximately $24 an hour. I feel like that is a bit low but I can live fairly comfortably on it and I realize my school is AMAZING!
     
  10. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I know I work most days of the week 7:30-5:00--4:00 is our official dismissal time but there are after school programs/tutorials/meetings that I stay after for. Yes, that's a choice it's not required (besides the meetings)-but I do feel like I work a very long week and don't get paid anything for that extra time. That's before thinking about work done in the evenings-planning, preparing activities, returning e-mails.

    We go back 2 weeks before the kids arrive (voluntarily sooner if you actually want to have time to set up your room) and this year I was required to do a week of pd during the summer. I think the point is that many of us do above and beyond our job expectations without the overtime that many professions get for the same extra work, but are still given a hard time about not working summers.
     
  11. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    How many teachers here are required to show up to work 4 weeks before school starts?

    We have to show up I think 0, maybe 1 at most.

    But 4 weeks, never heard of this before.
     
  12. MJH

    MJH Companion

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    Jul 24, 2013

    3 Weeks

    I had to report back 3 week before students plus a week to get my room ready so that makes 4 weeks for me. I don't get but maybe a half day to set up my room during those three weeks otherwise I'm in PD. It was mandatory this year because we are also doing curriculum planning and making common formative assessments.
     
  13. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Yeah, I didn't think it was accurate. For me, at least. This Summer, for example, I have 4 days of PD, and only one of them is technically required. Also, I don't spend three weeks planning my curriculum. I spend all the time planning. It's not something you can plan and then do. It changes all the time as you allow assessment to drive instruction and as you discover new methods or ideas to make your plans more interesting or beneficial. I don't know what he's talking about going back to school four weeks early. We go back on Monday and the kids return on Thursday. I actually WISH we had longer to get our rooms ready and make plans with our teams! My day lasts from 7:20-2:50 and lunch is a duty-free half hour, so that means my contracted day is SEVEN hours. Any time I have training or meetings outside my regular days I am compensated for it. Also, I don't work 9 months a year- I work almost TEN months. Finally, my pay is nowhere near $49,000 and this will be my 7th year teaching. I do spend several hours a week planning or grading papers outside my contracted hours.
     
  14. thirdgradebuzz

    thirdgradebuzz Comrade

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    It's not accurate for me. Maybe for a first year teacher. Granted, I am super organized and consider that one of my major strengths and skills. This is definitely not true for all the teachers I know.

    I work a 7.25 hour contract day. I'm usually am there an extra 30minutes, by choice. I get paid for any after school tutoring. We do have unpaid after school events 5ish times per year, only 2 of which are required (conference nights).

    Towards the end of the year, I do start staying later after contract time to prepare things for the beginning of the next year. I keep a notebook called "things to change" and jot in it whenever an idea for next year hits. At the end of the year, I start getting things ready to implement the changes I want to make.

    I don't take work home to grade or plan. I spend a lot of time on this site, and sometimes I look up new ideas for fun.

    During the summer, the only days I go in to school are days that I choose to, so that teacher work week is not so stressful. We are not required by my district to do any PD over the summer, unless it is needed for recertification. Even then, we can do I during the school year instead if we want the summer free. To be honest, many of my coworkers admit that they don't give much of a thought to school over the summer.
     
  15. Sm2teach

    Sm2teach Companion

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    Jul 24, 2013

    We have to be at school 1 week before school starts with 4 extra comp days sometime in the summer. Most teachers at my school come 2-3 weeks before school starts to set up their rooms.
     
  16. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jul 24, 2013

     
  17. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Is this mandatory by your school and district or is this your drive to be the best teacher you can be?
     
  18. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    I must also say I feel like I'm adequately compensated. I work 184 contracted days, 6 hours on work days and 7 hours on school days, including 30 minutes duty free lunch and 45 minutes planning daily. I arrve early by choice. I attend summer workshops by choice. I also go in at least a week early to set up my room. I like to visit, so I like knowing my stuff is done on first day back. I also work on IEP paperwork at home, usually 3 hours per student, unpaid. Even so, my pay is approaching $50 an hour, unless I forgot to count something. I drive 40 miles for that salary though. Closer to home would be a pay cut of at least $10K a year.
     
  19. OhThePlaces

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    This is not accurate for me.

    Im at school for approximately 9 hours a day (1 hour and 20 minutes past contract time). Teachers go back one week before students do at the start of the school year, although I plan to go in a few days (by choice) beforehand. 2-4 weeks of continuing education in the summer? No. I did 9 days this summer. A four day workshop that I took totally by choice, and one 5 day workshop that was "strongly recommended" by our superintendent, but we were also compensated for. I read PD books in the summer, browse Pinterest and read this forum for ideas, but that's a hobby that I enjoy.

    I wish I worked only 9 months a year, but our school year is 10 months. And I wish I made what the average apparently is, I make about 38k as a third year teacher. I would love to make more, but I feel pretty satisfied with my paycheck. It helps that my husband makes a decent income (not fantastic either though, he's been enlisted in the navy for the last 12 years).
     
  20. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Not accurate for me, but...who the heck still gets three month summers?! Haven't seen one of those since I was in kindergarten! Yet even people here who have children make comments about "three months off for summers". Huh?
     
  21. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    We are required to show up the day before the students. I go in 2 weeks earlier on my own time to set up my classroom. Otherwise I definitely wouldn't be prepared. For the first time ever I am voluntarily going to PD this summer... don't think I'm going to offer again for a while. I am paid a fair salary - I think I will reach $61 000 this year and I am going into my 5th year of teaching.

    During the school year I am at school from 8 - 5. We get 1 hour duty free lunch and 1/2 an hour prep. I am there voluntarily an hour before students and an hour after. I try to take home less each year, but at the end of the day, I do what I need to do to run a great program. I love my job - I love the planning, prepping and organizing so I rarely feel like it's 'work'. The meetings, reporting and conferencing I could do without and do it all on my own time as well.
     
  22. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Yeah I only get 2 months for summer, but I do only work 9 months a year when adding in Thanksgiving vacation, spring break, and Christmas vacation.
     
  23. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It's not really true for me, either, although I understand the sentiment. I am one of those teachers who prefers to leave at contract time (although I do come in a little early), and I leave school things at school whenever possible. I would agree that I work a lot more than my regular contract hours, even just adding in my early arrival time every day. I have done long professional development trainings in the summer, but I've usually been compensated for those.
     
  24. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    By contract, we are required to come in one week before students. However, each year we are given a deadline to have our rooms ready for Open House, and it is always before the contracted return date. So we all end up coming in "by choice" at least a week before our contract starts. Open House is always before school starts, and we are given no paid time to work in our rooms during those pre-service days.

    We also have about a week of PD every summer. Most of those days are paid. There seems to always be at least one "I can't offer a stipend for this day but I expect you to attend" PD day as well.

    I like to have a clean room. I like to learn new instructional methods. I enjoy the challenge of planning new activities to meet all learners in my room. It's all part of my job, but I don't get paid for all that extra time. My husband likes his job too, but he gets paid for all his time. I personally think one reason these expectations of teachers working "for free" after hours is because as a group, we tend to say, "Oh, it's okay. I like setting my room up/ lesson planning at night/ whatever. I don't need to be paid to do that."
     
  25. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Absolutely.
     
  26. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    It's not true for me either. I have a really long summer this year because I'm switching districts and they have opposite calendars (I ended early last year and I start late this year). However, the norm around here is about 6-7 weeks off for teachers. Usually there are work days/ PD after the students leave and teachers start going back about 2 weeks early (earlier than that is voluntary). I usually work summer school, but that's my choice. Other than that I don't do school work during the summer and they can't require us to go to PD unless it was already in the calendar for the school year. I know some teachers say they do tons of work in the summer, but I honestly find it hard to believe that they're working a regular 40 hour week during the summer months.

    At the beginning of the year I put a lot of hours in getting things set up, but after that I'd say in a typical week I work 45-47 hours. My work day is 8 hours and that is the standard around here. Some districts have even gone to 8 hours a day WITH students in an attempt to raise test scores for failing districts. I only grade assessments and that still took me about 2-3 hours per week last year outside of school. Planning and other required things took a couple more hours outside of contract hours. I really try to focus on teaching being my career and not my entire life. From what I've seen teachers who put in an insane amount of hours just stress themselves out and burn out quickly even though they tend to be really good at what they do. I guess it's a matter of personal preference but having a life outside of school is important to me.

    What irks me is when people honestly think teachers work a "part time" day because we get out earlier. Yes, my contract day ends at 3, but that's because I start at 7! I do think all of the breaks for summer/holidays are a huge bonus though, and sometimes teachers don't want to own up to this. I'm going into my 4th year and most of my friends my age in other fields are just now getting to the point where they might earn a few vacation days this year (not offered for new employees). I had several friends around here that couldn't go home for the holidays because they only got Christmas day off. I live across the country from my family but due to my schedule I visit home four times a year (and could go even more if I wanted) One of my friends who works in graphic design thought about moving out here, but with her work schedule she would get to visit home once a year for a few days, and not likely around the holidays. It is a huge perk!
     
  27. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Nope, this isn't true for me, either.

    At the beginning of the year, I admit I spend more hours and even probably go in the first two weekends of the school year to get myself "caught up" with all the first-day paperwork, etc. But after that, I refuse to.

    My duty day is 7:30 to 2:45, so 7.25 hours. I usually go in at 7 and am our by 3 or 3:15, so there's no way I work 12-16 hours. That would leave eight to 12 hours for non-work and that's just not going to happen.

    But as somebody mentioned above, if I needed to go in more, I would. It's my job and in this climate, when the alternative is NOT to have a job, I really won't complain. I'm grateful to have one and saddened to hear of fellow teachers who don't.
     
  28. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    One thing that graphic DID leave out was the money districts like ours EXPECT us to pull out of our pockets on behalf of our classes. (As in, "The teachers are always saying how much they care about the kids, so we can cut the budget here and the teachers will buy it for their classes....if they really care about the kids like they claim they do.")

    We had a superintendent a few years ago that wanted a small library in each classroom so that kids who were done their assignments early would have something to read. He was touring the rooms before the year started when he asked a neighboring teacher out in the hallway where the books were for her classroom library. When she replied that she would have books when the district sent them to her, he told her there was no budget for that. She then asked, "Where am I supposed to get them then?" "YOU buy them!" he screamed. "Go to dollar stores, yard sales, wherever, just GET some books!!"
    :|
     
  29. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I totally understand your point Reality. But I really try not to rely on my district for much of anything. They flip flop like a fish out of water, the district budget is cut by $35 dollars and they increase class size from 20 to 37, they pink slip 152 teachers claiming it is necessary, start of the following year all 152 are rehired even though nothing changed.

    So while I would totally prefer a better classroom budget for things that you are referring to, over the years I have "learned" it is better that my books, novels, tests,etc are mine. That I control and run my classroom.
     
  30. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    I think the school should have to provide the things they mandate. I'm ok with buying things that I feel like I need to do my job, for instance I spent $30 on a clicker to control the computer during presentations. However if they want me to have a class library then they should either give me the money or ship me some books.

    My room will be pretty basic until I start getting paid this year. I don't have much money to spend on extra stuff right now, but once I start getting paid I will probably get some more bulletin board decorations, ect. Right now I have the supplies I need but not much extra to make the classroom look good. If the school wants specific things right away, I think they should provide me the materials to accomplish what they want.
     
  31. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Pashtun, it is a combination of required and non-required PDs this summer - about 1/2 & 1/2.
     
  32. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Interestingly, our district did this about 10 years ago. They gave teachers money to purchase books for their classroom libraries. I was a new teacher and was like "sweet", bunch of veteran teachers refused the money. I didn't really get it. Then one day the district made us give them all those books back for a new school's library. Then I "got it".
     
  33. 1cubsfan

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    I am reading that many people say that they "don't mind" doing things because they don't "feel like" work. Regardless or whether it feels like work or not, we are qualified professionals who deserve to be compensated for the work that we do, even if we like it.

    Posting on here, reading PD books, looking on pinterest for ideas- fine, not work. Lesson planning, curriculum mapping, setting up the classroom- work.
     
  34. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Please explain how you decide what is and is not work for me.
     
  35. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Who actually gets a summer thats 3 full months? Everything else aside, it's a 10 month job, not 9.
     
  36. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    I do kind of consider some aspects of pinterest as lesson planning. I'm serious. I've found and printed/laminated some awesome anchor charts, found a great new way to teach summarization, found some things on TPT for my figurative language unit, found some ARP management ideas, planning my interactive notebook, etc.
     
  37. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I'm contracted for ten months with an eight and a half hour day with a 30 minute lunch. I'm expected to come in for pd and usually is not paid for it.
     
  38. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I honestly did not intend on starting a debate... I thought it was cute, and it is mostly true for me! I apologize to those who found it distasteful in any way.
     
  39. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    It's all good. I don't think anybody here is angry with each other (though I can't speak for others). :)

    It's interesting to see others' views, to be quite honest.
     
  40. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I have 184 contract days. Our last day was May 31. I report back August 19. So it's about two and a half months of summer.
     
  41. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    As many of you know, I am no longer teaching, but took a job in higher education as an administrator. I love it, but I know for a fact that my "on" time as a teacher was MUCH more than my "on" time in my job now.

    As a teacher, I was required to be at school from 7:45-4:00, slightly over 8 hours, with 20 minutes for lunch, and duty twice a week. ALL of those hours were "on", really even lunch because students were always needing something. Any plan time was spent in meetings or supervising other groups.

    In my job now, I work 7:00-5:00 M-R, and 7:00-11:00 F. Yes, that is a 10 hour day M-R, but let's be honest-I take an hour for lunch, if my kids have an appointment I just leave and take them, I left early last night because I wanted to go get a pedicure, and during the day I (obviously) have "off" time. It is the way it is.

    BUT, I do work year round, and the fact is that teachers do get some amount of time in the summer that is considered non-duty.

    So my point is, it's impossible to compare apples to oranges. Different jobs have different requirements.
     
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