troubled pre-K

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Guest, Dec 17, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Dec 17, 2002

    I teach a pre-K class of 10 kids. Many of these kids seem to have learning disabilities, problems with speech, and possibly some other problems (in my minimally educated opinion). My problem is that it's a very unprofessional school and so I have no resources available to me from within the school. At some point I will need to discuss with these parent s the possible need for special education or speech classes. What can I tell the parents as far as how to have them evaluated before kindergarten starts. Also, I think some of these children may not be ready for Kindergarten in Sept, but I wouldn't suggest holding them back on my opinion alone. What should I do?
     
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  3. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Dec 17, 2002

    evaluation

    Speech is acquired at certain ages, the blends and specific letters are able to be annunciated. Do some research to determine a criteria BEFORE talking to the parents. That way those children who are significantly 'behind' in speech can be referred for the parents to be concerned.

    As for recomending Kinder. you should again, create a criteria of skills and determine only those who are clearly incapable of those goals. Then refer them to the parents to seek external evaluation. Maturity isnt a reason to hold them back if their academia is satisfactory.
    ruth
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Dec 18, 2002

    As a parent of 4 and teacher of more I can certainly say that now is not the time to be determining which children may need special education and which will not.
    My own child was not doing well in kindergarden until March then she bloomed and not only did well but excelled.
    She also was difficult to understand and when speech was recommended as a parent i jumped at the chance.
    Speech therapy was good but music-chorus was even better. Her speech improved more in a year of chorus than 3 years of speech therapy.

    My oldest was having difficulty in kindergarden but squeaked by it wasn't until 2nd grade that it was discovered that he was extremely dyslexic but gifted. I wished i had been firmer earlier to have him tested.
    Go with the suggestion of what criteria a child has to meet to be considered successfully competent in first grade and make a decision accordingly in the spring when they've had a chance to grow mature and show you what they know.
    Debbie Bruster
     
  5. teacherkasey

    teacherkasey Cohort

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    Dec 18, 2002

    assessments

    I teach Kindergarten in a private day care center. If you would like, I could get a copy of the assessments we do for the children in the pre-k class so you would have some idea of the skills to look for when determining if the children are ready for Kindergarten. I could email it to you.

    Just thought it might save you a little time instead of starting from scratch. Let me know:)

    Kasey
    teacherkasey@msn.com:D
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Dec 18, 2002

    teacher kasey,

    I have a couple of differents lists of criteria for Kindergarten, but it might be helpful to take a look at another one. THANKS

    lmf1979@yahoo.com
     
  7. ®Unknown_Storm®

    ®Unknown_Storm® Rookie

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    Dec 21, 2002

    Wow, Sonic. I wish you luck. First, I would like to address the issue of assessment. I'm not sure if it's a state or federal law, but in Minnesota, if a school suggests a child be screened and/or assessed, the school has to pay for it. You might want to find out and talk with your principal or special ed. instructor if you have one. Second, Unregistered said "As a parent of 4 and teacher of more I can certainly say that now is not the time to be determining which children may need special education and which will not." You said yourself, in essence, that you do not feel capable of determing which children may or may not need additinal services. However, if after careful consideration you feel that "something's not right here", someone must do so. I therefore disagree with Unregistered's statement. I firmly believe in early intervention, and that's not possible without appropriate screening and assessment. If a child in need of services has to do without, think of all the time wasted. Think of all that child could have accomplished if only they had been given the opportunity.
     
  8. ®Unknown_Storm®

    ®Unknown_Storm® Rookie

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    Dec 21, 2002

    Forgot something.. just an FYI here. Seven years ago, the number of people with autism was 1 in 10,000 - 13,000. Today, the number is 1 in 250. One reason for the higher numbers may be that Asperger's Syndrome has now been included as a category through which a child may receive special ed. services. I believe that inclusion was made in 1999, but I'm not absolutely sure. I have it in my notes somewhere. (Asperger's Syndrome is autism at the highest level.) Just something to think about.
     

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