trouble with Beginning Middle End

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by 1stGradeNewbie, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. 1stGradeNewbie

    1stGradeNewbie Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2007

    I have been working on Beginning, Middle, and end and my kids have been having trouble with it. I've read a story to them and then I write B M E on the board and we talk about what happens in the Beginning, Middle, and End and we write a sentence or draw a picture. Then I have also had them listen to a story and then they take a piece of paper and fold it twice and do the same thing. But, they seem to have trouble knowing what's at the middle of the story. I read the book Get out of Bed by Robert Munsch and we did it as a class and then they did it independently. They were still wanting to say the beginning was She stayed up late watching tv and the middle was She fell asleep (which happened on the 2nd page.) Do you have any suggestions how to work on this?
     
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  3. jacksprat379

    jacksprat379 Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2007

    What if you provided pictures in a story board format? Then the kids could put those pictures in order (& not have to use memory to reconstruct the story.) They might could do this in groups & work it out together. Then as a whole class you could point out BME? Dunno.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 13, 2007

    Is it possible for them to use the book as a reference? I would show them that by using the book, you could look at the first few pages, find out what the most important thing that happened in those pages, look at the middle pages, find out the most important event, and the last few pages, find out what the most important event was. I had a problem with my 2nd graders picking out the events that weren't important for BME.
     
  5. 1stGradeNewbie

    1stGradeNewbie Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2007

    I have the book at the center that they can use already.
     
  6. fasteddy

    fasteddy New Member

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    Sep 13, 2007

    Keep in mind that at first grade this is going to be a work in progress. It may be hard to let go, but if they don't get it after reteaching try dropping the independent practice for a few days, a week or so, or longer and then try again. Of course you would continue modeling, and as a whole group you would practice but try waiting on the independent practice. You already know this but usually if the whole class is struggling then it might be that their just not ready to grasp the concept. As far as the teaching portion goes, it looks like your modeling really well. Have Fun!
     
  7. cb4pebbles

    cb4pebbles Companion

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    Sep 13, 2007

    Have a big poster of a hamburger. The top bun represents the beginning, the meat and toppings are the tasty middle full of info, and the bottom bun is the ending. I use this when working on the writing aspect.
     
  8. kgardner

    kgardner Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2007

    Okay, this may seem funny, BUT my kids were having the same problem. I went to Walmart and found a sandwich cookie (like an oreo, but different) that had a vanilla wafer, then creme, then a chocolate wafer. I had them hold up their cookie so that it was vertical, (does that make sense?). We discussed left and right (the vanilla had to go on their left so everyone's was the same direction). THEN we discussed which was first, second, and third, THEN we discussed which was the beginning of the cookie, the middle, and the end. I read a story and I asked, "okay, what part of the story is like the vanilla wafer? It's first, it is the beginning" and they totally had it!!! The next day, I only used the terms "beginning, middle, end" and they had retained it.
    Good luck!
     
  9. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Sep 13, 2007

    I introduce the book, introduce new vocab., do a picture walk and then read the beg. of the story, stop and tell them that you just read the beg. of the story and then ask them what happened in the beg. of the story, then read the middle of the story (tell them that you just read the mid. of the story) and ask them what happened in the middle and finally do the same thing at the end of the story.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 14, 2007

    The "middle" of most stories in the early grades is in or near 'the middle' of the book as small town mentioned. Hold up the book. Leaf through the first few pages showing the pics- what was the big idea on these pages? THEN go to the ENDING (skip the middle for now) Leaf theough these last few pages, What was the big idea here? How did the story end? What problem ws solved? Doing the Beginning and Ending first 'bookends' the story for the kids. Now go to the middle pages of the book (I love when the book is stapled in the center so the kids can easily find the exact middle) Show a few pages before and after this middle part. What was happening here? What was the big idea here? Was there a change in what was happening?
     
  11. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Sep 14, 2007

    You might even choose to put little sticky notes in the books that you leave out in centers stating where the beg./mid/end of the book begins and ends.
     
  12. MsX

    MsX Companion

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    Sep 14, 2007

    I remember my kids from last year having a bit of trouble with identifying the middle too. They'd pick something very early on. I spent a lesson or two on identifying problem/solutions. Then when I returned to beginning middle and end, I told them that usually there is a problem in the middle - this seemed to help them figure out what happened in the middle. I'd say "what happened in the middle? Think of the problem..." This also helped with identifying the ending because I told them that the problem is solved at the end.
     

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