Tricky choice....

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Baze10, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    205

    Jul 17, 2016

    Cost of reposting, sub fees, and time spent by administration are all recoverable.
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  2. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    1,180

    Jul 17, 2016

    Gotcha. Yeah that does suck. So if you back out, do it AS SOON AS POSSIBLE? Though I have to say, I've interviewed with Districts who misrepresented themselves, the position, working conditions and out right lied to me during the interview. The tactics these people pull out of desperation are insane. A contract really is supposed to be an agreement, correct? Where everybody is on the same page in terms of responsibilities, expectations and contributions? You do this and I do this. The HR lady flat out lied to me when talking about how to bump up pay. I questioned her on it, and believed her, which is partly what drew me in. Turns out, it was all complete BS and no one had any idea what I was talking about. Those people are slick, fast talkers to get candidates. And then once you've signed the contract, you're pretty much locked in. A friend gave them enough notice that she was looking for other employment and then resigned to go back home. The District filed a complaint to the State Ed department claiming "unprofessional behavior" and "misconduct" to take her license and after an investigation, they didn't find anything! When I tried to abandon mine mid-year, I had read it thoroughly and knew what conditions had to be met and they tried to tell me I "couldn't" resign and gave me all these stories. HAHAH! It seems to me that they didn't know about the contracts that THEY wrote. Pff! :roll:

    My point: EVERYBODY (Districts included) should be up front and in total agreement before offering and signing a contract. But I've now personally been involved in situations where that wasn't the case.
     
  3. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    205

    Jul 17, 2016

    Absolutely correct. Give them time if you're going to reject or they could take action.
     
  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    1,180

    Jul 17, 2016

    :thumbs:
    My district put in an out that said you'd have to pay a $2500 fee (for their losses) if you broke contract, but then tried to say it wasn't an option and that I couldn't do it.
    :rofl::toofunny:
    Reading is hard.
     
  5. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,307
    Likes Received:
    950

    Jul 18, 2016

    There have been teachers here who have stated they were given a verbal offer and then it was reneged and since they didn't sign a contract it was their loss. I would say do what's best for you.
    It happens in other professions too. A family member of mine was on their way to go sign their paperwork for a new job but got a call saying they gave the position away to a former employee. It was no more than a 20 minutes difference between the signed paper work and loss of a job. I would do what I thought was best for myself as long as it didn't carry any consequences regarding my certification.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,480
    Likes Received:
    2,362

    Jul 18, 2016

    Based on these threads that display an overall lack of consistency between states, or even districts in the same state, I would recommend the following to all job seekers:
    1. If you are offered a job, get a verbal commitment, or say yes - ASK about the time line, ASK about the steps involved in the hiring process, DEFINE your duties and their expectations, ASK about the contract, when to sign it, what does it mean - you get the point.
    2. Get explicit answers to the questions in #1, and write it all down, or have HR write it all down. Having the signatures of the Principals, Superintendent, or HR people you are dealing with can't be a bad thing, should things become contentious later.
    3. Make sure you have all of your ducks in a row. Make sure your references are truly willing to follow through and give you a reference ASAP when called. Make sure your current employer knows that you have been looking and may not be an employee in the coming school year. Hard as it may be, this is something that should be done face to face. If you were non-renewed but offered letters of reference, make sure they are in your hand, and you should REALLY read them. If they sound weak or iffy, perhaps this would be a great time to advocate for yourself, and ask if they could mention _______, something that was truly positive. The worst that can happen is a "no", but you might actually get a much stronger letter.
    4. Have some real parameters about where you would willingly go for a year, what the strengths and weaknesses are of a district, and whether or not you could actually be happy in that district/position BEFORE accepting the job. You may not really want to work there, but someone else might REALLY want to work there. If you string them on for weeks, only to walk because of buyer's remorse and lots of doubts, you have done a disservice to the district, and it may come back to haunt you if legal actions are taken. I personally believe that if you say "Yes", you should honor the commitment, although I know that to others commitment seems very wishy-washy . IF you do everything in #1 and #2, you will know exactly what the timeline is, etc. It will also make you a savvy job shopper. By having everything in writing, you will know what you are getting into, what to expect, and you should be able to say yes or no based on that info, making you someone who can honor their word.
    Do situations come up where considerations change? Sure, we are all human. However, IMHO, if you have done all the above, unless the job changes significantly, you should honor your commitment, so shop wisely. It will save you needless worry and stress, and pretty much do the same for the district that hired you.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2016
    agdamity likes this.
  7. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    51

    Jul 18, 2016

    This is great advice. School systems move slowly. Hiring processes seem to vary greatly. I never met with the superintendent and my employment never had to be approved by the board. I applied through my county, principals could then invite me in for interviews. I never had access to openings at specific schools. Once a principal hired me HR just got the ball rolling but they already had all of my paperwork to make sure I was hireable.
     
  8. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    205

    Jul 18, 2016

    Get it on paper is sound advice.
     
  9. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    51

    Jul 18, 2016

    I always say to never go back on your word. I had a friend do that, she accepted in county A then something better popped up in county B. She told county A that a better opportunity came up in county B so she changed her mind. Well county A called county B and county B rescinded their offer. She was left jobless and essentially unhireable by both counties. She had to move to get a job because people talk, they know each other, and they will talk about you.
     
  10. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    255

    Jul 18, 2016

    This is just nasty. I'm sorry but if districts can rescind offers, teachers can rescind acceptances.
     
    Pashtun likes this.
  11. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    51

    Jul 18, 2016

    When I was hired I had to sign something saying I had not verbally accepted another offer or signed a letter of intent anywhere else. She signed it and lied which is the reason they rescinded.
     
  12. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    205

    Jul 18, 2016

    That is the evil cousin of non-compete clauses. Its legal to do.
     
  13. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    255

    Jul 18, 2016

    That's completely different. If everything is just an oral offer/acceptance, anything is fair game. People rescind acceptances/resign ALL the time for something better in my region. As long as it's outside of 60 days before the school year starts.
     
  14. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,307
    Likes Received:
    950

    Jul 18, 2016

    It's just another instance where teachers are not expected to do what's right for them but what's easier for the district/school.
     
  15. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    445

    Jul 18, 2016

     
  16. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    445

    Jul 18, 2016

    I think your fourth point is spot on! Many times people take a job simply because they want their own classroom, and not because they really want to work there.
     
  17. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    205

    Jul 18, 2016

    You make a good point, but desperation often changes people's opinions too. Sometimes, people would rather have a tough offer to accept than no offer.
     
  18. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    1,180

    Jul 18, 2016

    Always, right? People can lie and "not remember," but they can't argue with a signature. Sorry, folks.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. RainStorm,
  2. agdamity,
  3. WongHF
Total: 307 (members: 5, guests: 278, robots: 24)
test