Trayvon and School: politics aside!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TeachOn, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    I am very curious what sort of reaction this issue is getting in schools, particularly among students.

    In my affluent, liberal, nearly all-white school, the reaction has been ... zilch! No hoodies, no skittles, no signs, no buttons. Students have not brought it up in my classes (There were places in our discussions where it might have fit in.), and I haven't heard that it's come up in anyone else's. No mention of it on school email by teachers, principal, other staff.

    It's kinda weird, I think. Any reaction at your school?
     
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  3. kme93

    kme93 Companion

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    Mar 29, 2012

    Same thing as you - none.

    I teach in a similar demographic.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I teach in a very small district. Our high school has about 230 students. I haven't seen anything nor heard any talk about it.
     
  5. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    I am teaching at an alternative high school. No reaction here either.
     
  6. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    I'm in a rural lower ses school, only a handful of students are not white.

    We've discussed it in class (to address my listening outcomes, we watch the news and work on summarizing skills at the same time). But there is no response to the movement activities.

    Student reaction to the news story is mixed. But, they are interested in the story.
     
  7. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Well I teach in Costa Rica and I think my kids have absolutely no idea it even happened.

    But I have seen pictures of "hoodie protest" from my university, an HBCU.
     
  8. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    I am in a small district in the midwest (380 students prek-12). A few students have mentioned it in class, but that is about it for interest in this issue.
     
  9. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    I teach in small rural elem. schools and some of my kids are
    talking about it. One little girl posted about it on FB (she is ten)
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This is similar to what I've seen at my school, which is an urban school, low SES, 50% Hispanic, 40% Black, 10% Asian/Pacific Islander.

    I haven't talked with my classes about it, but I know some teachers have. I've heard students mention the story and share their opinions about it, but I haven't seen any sort of action.
     
  11. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    My school is about 85% Hispanic, and I haven't heard any of the students talking about it here. They did talk about Kony, though, when that video was going around.
     
  12. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    I teach in an alternative school in the suburbs. Very racially and economically mixed. Some minor discussion, but nothing major. My reading class has talked about it a lot because we do current events every week, and that was our topic this week. That's it, though.
     
  13. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    None at all here either- I teach in a K-8 so although I wouldn't expect the elementary kids to know much I thought middle school kids might. The middle school is about 60% extremely affluent white students and 40% hispanic mostly very low SES students. The elementary is the opposite with 60% hispanic and 40% white. As far as I'm aware, we do not have any black students in the entire school.
     
  14. Bioguru

    Bioguru Companion

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    I teach at a mostly white school and there's been no talk of the situation. As KateL mentioned, Kony was big for about one day and like every other internet trend I'm sure only a few students even remember who Kony is today.
     
  15. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    I teach in a predominately African American school, and there has been no talk of it. In fact, I did not know much about it until I asked a colleague about it this morning.
     
  16. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    I teach in an affluent school in the suburbs with mostly white students, and some Chinese and Indian students.
    There has been nothing here.
     
  17. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    None. I teach in a relatively diverse school.
     
  18. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I teach math, so it wouldn't have come up.

    And our kids are in uniforms; no hoodies in sight. (Skittles aren't even sold in the cafeteria.)
     
  19. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    My school is near where the incident happened so we are getting lots of interest. When the subject comes up, I try to get the students to see that they have to look at both sides of a story before making a decision. They also need to learn that right now they are just hearing rhetoric from each side.
     
  20. orangepurple

    orangepurple Companion

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    Mar 30, 2012

    I have been surprised to hear absolutely nothing about this at school. I have been following it myself, and feel like it is a big issue--but my students, 40% or so who are black--do not seem to be conversant with current events at all! Since they don't read the paper or talk about the news, I am reluctant to bring this up--even though we are talking about race and stereotyping in my classroom. It is something that I am kind of wanting to discuss but I'm not quite ready to, if the kids don't bring it up.

    I really see how my students could be Trayvon--the way way people perceive them.

    By the way, last year, I had occasion to call the police about a potential intruder, and the first question the dispatcher asked me about the guy was "is he black?"
    um, no, why?
     
  21. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Yet the flip side of it is that they can be so oblivous at times.

    A week or two ago, two of my sophs were looking for a teacher they didn't know, to deliver something from another teacher. (Wait, I remember: it was St. Patrick's Day, and another teacher wanted to give Sue a candy treat.) They stopped me and asked me which homeroom was Sue's. I said I wasn't sure of the room number, but there were two black women teaching in this paticular hallway; Sue's homeroom was the first one they would come across. They were stunned that I referred to her as black. I had to laugh--and she did too when I told her about it. We're friends-- just as she would refer to me as 'blonde" I'm very comfortable describing her skin color to kids tryng to distinguish her from the white teacher in the next room.
     

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