Transitioning from lunch/recess to direct instruction

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by lotusblossom, Apr 13, 2007.

  1. lotusblossom

    lotusblossom Companion

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    Apr 13, 2007

    The title says it all. Is there a way to ease into direct instruction after lunch and recess?

    The kids are chatty and wiggly and I'm okay with that as long as it's temporary. Good way to bridge the gap? :)
     
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  3. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Apr 13, 2007

    Foreshadow...let kids know, before they leave for lunch, exactly what will happen when they return. Remind them, if possible as they are getting ready to return from recess. Do this verbally and with a posted schedule (assuming they are developmentally able to make use of it).

    Create clear expectations about movement from recess into the instructional setting (include clear directions about getting materials ready, etc).

    Plan an engaging "set induction" or motivating activity that will capture their attention and get them ready for the direct instruction.

    Do all of this clearly and consistently.

    Expect them to be able to do this successfully.

    Model that fact that you value this instructional time, it is important and you will work with them to help them be successful.
     
  4. kmm898s

    kmm898s Rookie

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    Apr 13, 2007

    I have the same problem and I began reading a class novel out loud (usually a Mark Twain award book and the kiddos vote on it). I read a chapter a day out loud to them while they sit and listen or just chill for a minute. I do this right after recess so they can cool off and get used to the classroom setting again. It also helps with their listening and visualizing skills.
     
  5. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Apr 13, 2007


    A good idea as a tool to help the transition, but how do you know it is helping their "listening and visualizing skills?"
     
  6. lotusblossom

    lotusblossom Companion

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    Apr 13, 2007

    Great suggestions! Unfortunately, the group I walk to lunch is not the same group I teach after lunch. Our kids change classes, similarly to middle/high school.

    Reading aloud is a great idea, get the fidgets out, relax until it's time to go into full-on "academic mode"
     
  7. jd019

    jd019 Companion

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    Apr 13, 2007

    My 6th hour class is very rowdy, they are not coming from lunch it is just the make up of the group. I started tuning off my classroom lights when they come in, it really helps calm them and sets a peaceful tone for the whole hour.
     
  8. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Apr 13, 2007

    Do you teach specific subjects only (i.e. Language Arts/Social Studies or Math/Science)? I ask because you posted that you teach different students in the afternoon than you do in the morning. With my kiddos, I have them buddy up to practice flash cards. Then after about 5-10 minutes we do a timed test or some type of math game (like popcorn or bingo). When we're finished the kids know we go straight into math. If you do a reading class, they can buddy read for about 10 minutes (set a timer). My kids also have the choice of reading by themselves. When the timer goes off then it's time to get started together.
     
  9. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    Apr 13, 2007

    It depends on the age group. You're the one with the 3rd grade practicum, right?

    One thing you might want to do is find a movement song (Hap Palmer, etc.) that starts out fast & silly, winds down slowly, and ends with children sitting, hands in lap, etc.

    The kinesthetic experience of being wound-up from lunch & recess needs to be manipulated so that you are actually bringing them down, and showing them how to do so... not just telling them to do it.
     
  10. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Apr 14, 2007

    I was thinking a song as well. Even if it's not a movement song...just a short song to play while they get settleled. I play a song at the end of the day while the kid are packing up. By the time the song is over, they are to have their things ready and be sitting on the floor, ready to listen to the read aloud. They get to learn pretty quickly how long the song is and at what point they had better be done.

    You could play a song and, depending on what you want them doing after lunch, they have that certain amount of time to be ready. Books, pencils, etc. out, hands folded (or whatever you want them to do) out on their desk and ready to learn. Give small prizes to those ready first. (stickers, candy etc.)
     
  11. carrots1234

    carrots1234 Rookie

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    May 1, 2007

    filler time ideas

    I'm a full time student majoring in Elementary education curriculum.
    I will begin to student teach in the fall.
    In the meantime, I am working as a substitute teacher for 7 months.
    I've learning a great deal about classroom management.
    I learned quickly to bring extra material (i.e. worksheets, and rewards).

    I've incorporated learning games during transitions.
    One game I play is, "Sparkle"

    The object of the game is to choose one student to recite the first letter of word (chosen from the word wall or their spelling words) then the next person must spell the second letter etc etc. until the word is correctly spelled.
    After the student recites to last letter of the word, the next student will say, "sparkle" & the person next to him/her will have to sit down (at whicjh point they are eliminated.

    The rules for the game include, no talking during the time the teacher recites the word the students are to speel and when each student is reciting a letter from the word.

    The students will be disqualified if when it is their turn to recite a letter from the given word and they ruin the order in which the students were chosen to recite a letter from the word.

    "Listening" is essential when playing this game. You need to pay attention and listen for the letters that have been recited by other students so you will know which letter will come next in order to execute the correct spelling of the word!
    Kids LOVE this game. They simply cannot get enough of it.
    I use this game to encourage good student behavior.

    My question is:
    Do you know of any other educational games that can be used during transitional periods including when students are waiting for the dismissal bell, or for filling in time when necessary?
     
  12. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    May 1, 2007

    When I taught first we did our calendar stuff during this time. This way they could still get wiggles out, but settle back in. I also allowed bathroom break during this time. I also did flashcards of site words, our shapes we were to know, & read a story of some sort either picture book type or Chpt of Junie B Jones.
     
  13. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    May 1, 2007

    I have several Brain Quest games. Those are wonderful time fillers when we're waiting in line. My kids also like to play Snap, Clap, Stomp. This is a word wall game where they snap on high letters (b,d,f,h,i,k,l,t), clap on middle letters (a,c,e,m,n,o,r,s,u,v,w,x,z), and stomp on hanging letters (g,j,p,q,y). They love both of these. I usually have a student call out a word wall word. Then the class says it together, then snap/clap/stomp the letters, and say the word again. Sometimes we play a version that lets the students come up and lead the class in the activity. They get to choose the next person to lead the next word.
     
  14. carrots1234

    carrots1234 Rookie

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    May 1, 2007

    Could you give me an example?
    thanks!
     
  15. nc4th

    nc4th Rookie

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    May 1, 2007

    I have a silly games that seems to calm my students down. It is a song that they repeat after you (t-teacher s-student):
    T: I said a boom chicka boom
    S I said a boom chicka boom
    T I said a bbom chicka boom
    S I said a boom chicka boom
    T I said a boom chicka rocka chicka rocka chicka boom
    s I said a boom chicka rocka chicka rocka chicka boom
    T uh huh
    S uh Huh
    T Oh yeah
    S Oh yeah
    T one more time
    S one more time
    T (they will name a style, my kids love opera and robot style then you say the style)
    S (they repeat what you have just said)
    When you finish you sing it again in the style you chose. I do about 4 styles. I try to end it in quiet as can be style so that they are finished they are whispering and quiet.On the last verse instead of saying one more time I say and now we're done they repeat and then have a seat and they repeat and sit
     
  16. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Do you really sing opera-style - and how do you do robot?
     
  17. nc4th

    nc4th Rookie

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    Yes, the kids love it. They do the robot and sing/say it like they think a robot would. I sometimes have them demonstrate or lead if I am unsure what they mean. They also love Michael Jackson style which I think is funny and way before their time. They do the moon walk in a very high pitch voice. The girl love Ballerina style so they can embarrass the boys. It may not be good but I do it:eek:
     
  18. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    May 1, 2007

    nc4th, I used to LOVE that when I was at camp as a kid... my campers did, too. :)

    A transition game I like doesn't really have a name... I modified it from "Children's Quiz" which was sold by DIscovery toys when I was a kid (my mom used to sell them)... I give kids a letter and a category, they collectively try to come up with as many things as they can that fit that category (so, for instance.... S and foods... spaghetti, Saltines, sugar, soda, etc). Usually I play that

    1. raise your hand and I call on you before you answer
    2. no repeating an answer... you have to listen to what's been said!
    3. if your hand is up, you answer immediately... no answer, put your hand down.

    I've had kids of all ages enjoy this game... the older they are, the harder the letter/category I give them. ;)
     
  19. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    May 12, 2007

    The twenty question electronic game is wonderful. My kids love it...it was cheap (less than $10).
     
  20. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    May 12, 2007

    Sure. What we say will be in bold, what we do will be normal.

    thing
    t snap with hands over head
    h snap with hands over head
    i snap with hands over head
    n clap in front of body
    g stomp with foot
    thing
     

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