Transitioning between two different classes

Discussion in 'High School' started by alto1jr, Aug 17, 2008.

  1. alto1jr

    alto1jr Rookie

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    Aug 17, 2008

    How do those of you who teach two or more different classes transition from one to the other? I will be teaching freshmen English I(4th year) and juniors English III(1st year) and feel worried about this. I feel I will be treating my juniors as if they were freshmen and will get confused about the lessons. Planning will be my top priority this year, but it will be my first time teaching two different classes. Any ideas or comments will be greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Aug 17, 2008

    It's not as challanging as it might sound. I'm doing 3 classes.... world history, geography, and government. Before each class period I glance over the lesson plans and my notes for the class, and I'm usually good to go.

    As for treating kids differently... I basically end up treating all my classes in a similar manner, because I'm in a small school and in more than one class have 9-12th graders in the same room.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 17, 2008

    I'm teaching 5 different classes :)eek:). Transitioning between classes is the least of my concerns!

    It's not very difficult at all, really. When a new batch of students come in, it'll take you mere moments to sort of "get into the zone" of that class. You'll remember what you did the day before--and if you need a little reminder, consult your notes or just ask the students: "Hey, guys! Tell me what we did last class." It's a great quick review anyway.

    I don't treat my freshmen different from my juniors, so I don't know if I can help you there. I treat all my classes like they need to be treated, if that makes sense. Certain classes need me to be a little more stern and rule-y, and other classes need me to be more like a buddy. I do whatever is necessary for the class and in the moment.
     
  5. SciTeacherNY

    SciTeacherNY Companion

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    Aug 17, 2008

    My biggest piece of advice is to keep things organized. So for each different prep have a different folder with the worksheets/activities needed for that particular day.

    As for how to treat different age groups, I usually treat them all the same, especially in the beginning. As the year progresses, I alter this based on need. My most immature class last year was my juniors, while my most mature class was my sophomores - so age is not always a determining factor in treatment.
     
  6. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Aug 17, 2008

    I agree that you just need to keep your lessons organized and keep student work and homework in separate files. I use stackable bins for this. As far as the ages being different, treat them all the same until you get to know their personalities. You really won't find there's a whole lot of difference between them other than what they are learning from you.
     
  7. dovian

    dovian Comrade

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    Aug 18, 2008

    Put up your preclass assignments for all classes first thing in the morning. If the kids know what they need to do when they come in, they will get started and you get a few minutes to breathe and switch gears. It also helps remind you what you are supposed to be doing each period.
     
  8. sciencegurl

    sciencegurl Companion

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    Aug 19, 2008

    You've gotten great advice. I just wanted to say that I prefer years where I teach more than 1 prep to years when I only have 1. It's a bit of a change of pace to NOT teach the same thing for 5 periods in a row
     
  9. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Aug 19, 2008

    I have 5 preps this year (and had that many last year as well). I found the best way for me to organize things was to have everything ready to go, and in seperate folders on my desk and in the order I would be teaching them at the begining of the day. I actually found it easier to have seperate planning books for each class, that way everything was together. I could grab a class and go (attendence and grade books were a whole nother matter...I only have one of those). During each class, any handouts I needed were in the folder, and anything I collected and didn't give right back was paperclipped and put into that class's folder. When it was time to change classes, I put that folder on the bottom of the stack, opened up the next folder, skimmed through it to remind myself what I was doing and was good to go. The whole transition (for me) took about a minute. As far as how to treat each class, you'll find that each one has it's own personality. Even if you have two sections of the same class, you'll find yourself treating them how they need to be treated (like cassie said...if it doesn't make sense now, it will in a few days).
     

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