Transitioning between lessons

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by SashaBear, Jul 27, 2008.

  1. SashaBear

    SashaBear Companion

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    Jul 27, 2008

    What are some tips on transitioning to a new lesson? This isn't something I've had to think about before.
     
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  3. LionPride

    LionPride Companion

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    Jul 27, 2008

    Sometimes I have them say the poem or part of the poem we are currently working on.
    I give them instructions for what I want them to do and then tell them that they should be completely ready by the time we have finished reciting the poem.
     
  4. JBteach

    JBteach Companion

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    Jul 27, 2008

    Some ways to transition to a new lesson is to play a song or have them repeat any type of saying after you. Sometimes students do need a couple minutes of break especially the real young ones so I will do a quick game of simon says or have students quietly pantomine what I am doing. They seem to love that. Also, I will clap a pattern and students will copy the pattern.

    If students are talking I try to get their attention by using some of the morning meeting methods like

    Show me your eyes
    Show me your ears
    Show me your elbows

    I will continue this until I have everyone's attention.
     
  5. Lysander

    Lysander Companion

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    Jul 27, 2008

    While I get my materials ready, I give my students 1 minute to have quiet conversations with their friends (near them). If students know they will have this time, they are less likely to talk during the actual lesson, and it gives me a moment or two of breathing time between lessons. It takes practice at the beginning of the year to structure it and make sure they use appropriate volume, but once they have it, it works beautifully.
     
  6. peridotylayne

    peridotylayne Companion

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    Jul 27, 2008

    You could have them skip count numbers - grade level would determine which sets.

    I usually let mine have quiet conversation also, however, with 4th graders - those conversations quickly turn to video games and movies that aren't school appropriate - at least with the boys. The girls tended to opt for tickling contests. (Yes - it was a rough year, lol.) When that happened they needed to pull out a book and read for a few weeks until they were ready to try again.
     
  7. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jul 27, 2008

    I set the timer and tell them they have 2 minutes to talk (but they must stay in their seats.) When the timer goes off, sometimes the don't want to quiet down-- so I'll whisper "If you can hear me, touch your nose.." The ones who hear it,do it. The rest notice, touch their nose, and then look over to me to find out why in the world they are doing it. It quiets them down quickly. (Obviously, I use different words each time -- sometimes it is touch your nose, tug your earlobe, touch your toes, pat your cheeks, roll your hands, etc.
     
  8. lysithea88

    lysithea88 Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2008

    Movement as transitions

    I recently finished reading Eric Jensen's Teaching with the Brain in Mind which gives many practical suggestions for incorporating brain research into the classroom. Jensen states that physical movement is essential for students to incorporate new skills/information into their long-term memories. He suggests that every time we teach something new, we give kids a couple of minutes of movement in order to digest the info. For example, have them walk two laps around the room or complete a yoga move or do a set of jumping jacks immediately after teaching a new lesson. Not only would it help with cognitive function, but it can also act as a transition to the next activity.

    Hope this helps!
     
  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jul 27, 2008

    I often roll the big foam dice.. (two of them)...we add up the total... then I draw a card (I have them premade)..and whatever the card says, we have to do the number of times the dice says...

    So 4 and 2 means 6. We do 6 jumping jacks. Or 6 toe touches. Or spin around 6 times. Or sing Happy Birthday 6 times.. etc. etc. etc.

    The kids love the movement.
     
  10. IndyJo

    IndyJo Companion

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    Jul 27, 2008

    It depends on the subject and how the students are at that time. If I feel they have been Oxford Scholars, I usually let them socially interact or do a free-stretch. If the lesson is rather low-stress, I usually do a math counting activity, or we do an alphabet run. The alphabet run is I think of a topic and each person has to give something that falls into that category, but starts with the next letter in the alphabet.
     
  11. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 27, 2008

    I sometimes have my students silent read. :) I am coming up with other transition time suggestions this year, also.
     
  12. lajones81

    lajones81 Rookie

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    Jul 31, 2008

    Love these ideas! Keep them coming! :)
     

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