Training question: I'm afraid to tell them I wasn't trained properly

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Kenz501, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,693
    Likes Received:
    2,402

    Feb 9, 2018

    OP, if you graduated without the terminology to know what questions to ask, I would have to have a get together with the university that graduated you. Perhaps you have forgotten what was in the courses you took, or perhaps your tuition was poorly spent. I would have to have a serious conference with the people who said you were, in fact, trained. Take a lawyer with you, along with copies of all of the threads you have authored.
     
  2. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2017
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    147

    Feb 9, 2018

    Not really. This thread started by asking how you should approach your admin about your lack of training. Other threads have been titled "there are just days when I feel like I can't do anything right". "I'm failing at lesson planning" and "should I just quit?" None of these titles sound proactive.
     
  3. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    108

    Feb 10, 2018

    Ok - Some questions -
    Does your district or school have a pacing plan for your grade level? This is something to ask for from your dept head. Take some (Lots) of time with both your text book and your pacing plan, and plan your lessons from this. YOU can create those scripted lessons you want by seeing what you need to teach and how long you have to teach it. With me still? good - next

    You will break down what skills your kiddos need for each lesson and that is what you will go into more detail with in the other class. (sorry, forgot what it's called)

    Ok - for both clsses - teach bell to bell, but please include as much time as possible when students are allowed, encouraged and taught how to speak to each other using academic language to solve academic problems. For this, google Kagan, or anything else you might know about student to student academic voice or cooperative learning. You want them talking, if it is on task. Also - how are they seated/grouped? You get to decide this. If there are partners that get off task - move them away from each other and redirect.
    NONE of this is easy and ALL of it takes tons of planning time, as well as practice, practice, practice. Please don't rely on how or what YOU learned as a child - they are not you - they are not each other. No one way fits all, but read the research about what works for most - or if your principal wants something specific, go with that. (At least be willing to try it) This might be especially difficult if it is a subject that came easy to you and you loved it - they might hate it and might have blocks that you won't think of if you go off of what you remember for you. I'm lucky in a way - I teach a topic with which I'm still pretty non-academically inclined. It helps me see how I have to almost translate it into Academic language.

    Do you keep notes of what and how you teach and how it went and why? self reflection takes time, but again, so worth it.
    I too felt like my teacher training was a very expensive year that I later discovered had nothing to do with what I do in the classroom - Some amazing connections, some not so much, but really I feel like I had to do to learn. and I still go to trainings - mostly district - and they lecture to us - and again, I have to take that same information and apply it before it becomes something I have actually learned.
    I threw a lot at you just now. Go back to beginning. Text book and pacing plan. Start there. keep breathing!
     
  4. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    516

    Feb 10, 2018

    It sounds like you are well-aware of what hasn't worked for you whether it be in developing engaging lessons or being consistent in your classroom management - you scored unsatisfactory in both of these areas. IMO, you can receive a zillion suggestions and observe every teacher in your school, but ultimately it's your responsibility to learn to deliver an effective lesson.

    In another somewhat related thread, the question asked was, "How do you know if you're a good teacher?" Among several attributes that I included in my response was perseverance - a good teacher demonstrates perseverance when instruction falls short of the mark by effectively revising subsequent lessons to ensure mastery by all students. I believe most effective teachers are adept at analyzing their lessons so that they can make the necessary changes to improve them. Instead of listening to music during my 50-mile commute home, I used to analyze every aspect of the day's lessons and thought of ways of tweaking them the following day - I did this every day for many years until I perfected my technique. Teaching can be quite difficulty, but it's not rocket science. However, as we have all learned, it does require your persistence and willingness to reflect on your work in the classroom. Have you ever thought about what you do or don't do that results in your class "getting out of control"? The key to your success lies in your ability to reflect, analyze and effectively adapt or modify what you do.
     
  5. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    Training--

    Yes, I think my university did me a disservice, so I went to grad school to try to get what I missed. It was really the same story, only worse this time because classes were online, and I could look up any information I needed to complete projects and such. I don't remember if I used that in a way that wouldn't benefit me, though. Why would I? I wanted to learn the material. I also had to take comps and such, but many of them had multiple choice or easy essay questions. Honestly, I feel like college was easier than high school--a lot of the answers were intuitive, not formulaic, contrived, and about trying to guess what the teacher was thinking. My most difficult years were probably in elementary school, because I had to learn how to "read" my teachers. College, all I had to do was do the work and demonstrate that I understood the information. I didn't understand why they didn't try to teach me like that all along when I finally got there.

    Now, though, since I can't apply anything and really don't remember a lot of the terminology, I feel like I've been gypped. Nothing was ever really reinforced. Most of my skills were taught in isolation. I learned how to write a lesson plan and develop lessons, but I didn't write lesson plans from the lessons I developed, usually. My guess would be I didn't really "learn" the material, maybe just committed it to short-term memory, took a test, completed a project, and forgot it when I wasn't actually tasked with applying it while I was learning it. I don't know if it's the college's fault or mine, but I do have a master's in Education and no real idea how to teach. I know my material pretty well, but the Education classes were kind of a joke; they were way too easy.

    When I got into student teaching, I was lost both times. Not having good interpersonal skills didn't help. The first time, I had high-school seniors and a male teacher who was extremely accommodating, I guess because he didn't want to see me fail. The second time around I had middle school students at a private school and a teacher who had probably won teacher of the year. I was so intimidated I mostly just sat in the corner and observed. There were lots of questions I wanted to ask her because I wanted to get as good as her, but nothing I tried really worked. She tried to train me, but it all went by in a blur. I didn't want to ask her to repeat anything or show me again; it felt wrong. Luckily, I got sick and was transferred to a night program for adults. The lessons were scripted and my co-teacher is the one who took care of the "teaching" role. I mostly just tutored and followed her lead. This became apparent after she quit; the students stopped coming.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  6. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    Yes, well, I really wanted to work with animals, or maybe go to law school, but I didn't want to feel like I wasted my first four years of college, so I pursued Education. I really should have done more research; I didn't know there was possibility of being stuck. I wasn't in the best financial situation at the time and used the college I attended as an alternative to moving back in with a parent and stressing him/her out. Really, I should have just gone for it and moved in with the parent. I couldn't see that far, though. I was only about eighteen, and I didn't have the reasoning skills that I have now. I felt like I needed to be in the area in case someone I knew needed me; I wasn't really thinking logically about my situation at all.

    Research is something I should have done more of, but I didn't even have good researching skills as a recent high-school graduate. I asked the person directing us on what to choose. I was steered toward teaching. I still viewed school as a place that could transform me, also. I thought that if I lacked a certain set of skills, surely they would teach them to me in college. They were so thorough in high school, and their business was education and teaching people who really wanted to learn, so why not? It never occurred to me that I had to actually teach myself essential skills I needed for the job, well, until student teaching was over and I discovered that I hadn't really learned anything valuable.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  7. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    Personality--

    I'm not naturally good with people.

    It was naive of me, but I thought college could help me with that, so I deliberately chose a profession where I would have to interact with people so that I could master the skills I needed. I can't say it hasn't benefited me somewhat, but I'm not thriving in any area of this. My social skills are still below par, and I can't do my job that effectively.
     
  8. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I guess I would really make more progress if I stopped crying about it, but how difficult would it be for someone to just show me what I'm missing? It's basic. I don't know how to make lessons using the curriculum because I'm not really sure how to read the curriculum guide. Because of this, I've made all sorts of mistakes even a first year teacher shouldn't make, like teaching the wrong material, wrong level of material. How hard would it be to demonstrate to me "first you need to do A, then B, then C?" Nope. I'm expected to already understand all of this, even though most of the schools where I was trained used a much more detailed pacing guide that was harder to misunderstand.

    I'm also, again, not sure how to translate what I see in the curriculum guide into lessons. I recently figured out which textbook I'm supposed to be using as my main resource. It's important things like that that I've been struggling with simply because no one has trained me.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  9. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,457
    Likes Received:
    968

    Feb 10, 2018

    Well, it's proving to be quite difficult. Please remember that "basic" doesn't mean simple.

    Again, it seems to be quite difficult. You have been given steps, but then you say it still isn't good enough. Short of taking over your classroom, I'm not sure what else can be done.
     
  10. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I'm not sure, but I think the problem I'm having understanding how and what I'm supposed to teach is what is primarily affecting my students' behavior in the classroom. I introduce a concept they don't understand, so they start asking each other for help. Meanwhile, my underachievers, knowing my attention is on the sudden commotion that erupted, cause even more disruption by using the confusion as an occasion to rough house and have social time. That's the formula for an out-of-control class in a nut-shell.
     
  11. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    The problem is always the same--they assume I have knowledge that I don't have, so they show me something that doesn't really mean anything to me, not what I asked for, or at least they never go into enough detail.

    For example, if I ask "how can I figure out what to teach?," they may answer, "just use the textbook." I go back to my classroom and see two or three textbooks and think to myself, which one did they mean and how exactly should I use this textbook?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  12. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,457
    Likes Received:
    968

    Feb 10, 2018

    Ask which textbook AT THE TIME.

    Have you actually looked at your teacher's guide? Mine includes a pacing guide and step by step lessons.

    I don't use that because my grade level partner and I created our own pacing guide to suit our school calendar and needs. I generally create my own lessons because I have been teaching for 25 years. However, I still read the book. I can modify lessons or leave lessons for subs to follow because it is so scripted.

    If an untrained substitute teacher can walk into my classroom and follow a textbook lesson for a day, a trained person should be able to do it every day.
     
  13. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I probably could if someone would show me what to do. I just recently figured out which textbook I was supposed to be using, though.

    I was usually told to use the textbook as a sub was when I subbed elementary. I seldom had the luxury in high school and junior high classrooms.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  14. CherryOak

    CherryOak Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2016
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    153

    Feb 10, 2018

    I keep thinking of things to respond with, but based on past posts, I have no reason to believe the advice would be considered. This is why people eventually kick into let her "sink or swim" mode as you have mentioned. You can't help someone if they're not willing to help themselves. You have a choice to make.
     
    czacza likes this.
  15. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    My guess is a lot of people, for whatever reason, think this, but why? I'm not posting here with the intent of antagonizing. I just don't know what questions to ask to get minor assistance. If I Google "how to plan lessons" or "how to map curriculum," I don't get what I'm looking for. When I started this job, I started asking questions like crazy to try to figure it out, but after I got more or less the same responses, I guessed that the expectation was for me to figure it out on my own. I tried it and came up with a system of survival, but why should I stay in "survival mode" if I don't have to? It's cost me and my students many hours of valuable instructional time.

    I still don't really get it. Even the dishwasher at a restaurant is supposed to be trained on the rules and procedures that will help him / her do his / her job effectively, yet they won't show teachers and other professionals similar courtesy?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  16. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,693
    Likes Received:
    2,402

    Feb 10, 2018

    OP, time for some tough love. You went into a profession that is not suited to your abilities. You pursued a graduate degree that basically allowed you to cheat/skate through assignments, and you failed to see that what the courses were about wasn't something to get through, but necessary information that you would need on a daily basis. You cheated yourself out of an effective education. You have authored countless threads, received so many well thought out responses, but, just like the other education that didn't stick, nothing here helps you be a better teacher because you fall back on the mantra "I wasn't trained. Why won't they train me?"

    OP, you were trained - you failed to learn. "College, all I had to do was do the work and demonstrate that I understood the information." They assumed that understanding the information was, in fact, proof that you could use the information. I would make the same assumption about a student. If they understand, and can use the information by producing gradable work, I would assess them as proficient.

    Perhaps going to a brick and mortar institution would have helped. If you had asked these same questions repeatedly in your classes, the other students and instructors might would have realized that you seem to be able to mimic, but not actually intuitively, able to use the information you were taught. I believe it would have been impossible to hide your deficits. Did you ever tell your instructors that you are on the spectrum? That seems like information that should have been declared.

    You were trained, you didn't learn. With that history, I see little likelihood that anything a colleague would "train" you would stick any better. I'm sorry you never thought through the aspect that you are not good with people, but anyone who reads your posts realizes that almost immediately. How? By the constant asking and whining about the same thing repeatedly. That is actually an indication of ASD. If you want to learn terminology, get out your college texts, revisit your completed assignments, and go through them with eyes wide open this time, not the attitude that they don't "really matter." Take your questions to the instructors who taught those classes.

    Best of luck, because I do believe that you are in a profession that requires constant learning (usually on your own, through research), and there are no magic pills you can take to bypass these steps. You seemingly don't want to research and learn however it is that you learn best - you want the quick shortcut answers without any understanding of WHY things are done this way. I don't know how you can expect success with that attitude.

    I've worked hard to learn and hone my craft, and nobody gave me the "instant knowledge" that you have had access to and failed to internalize. You may not write to antagonize, but on many levels that is exactly what you do. If you want to be "trained" go be the dishwasher.
     
  17. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,846
    Likes Received:
    1,678

    Feb 10, 2018

    There's really nothing to add that I, and others, haven't said before--many times.

    Effective teachers are always learning. They know that there isn't a one-size-fits-all. The textbook and teacher's guide may be a good place to start, but if you can't make that work, you'll need to find something else. There are an abundance of lesson plan, unit plan, and long-range plan templates on-line. Find what works for you. Be prepared, though, that you need to be always changing. I've been at this for a long time and every year is different. Heck, what worked in my room last month just isn't working for all of my students right now. I need to spend a lot of time this weekend doing some soul-searching and lots of research to get things back on track.

    (If non-fiction or media are part of your curriculum, take advantage of the Olympic Games.)
     
    Been There likes this.
  18. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,739
    Likes Received:
    1,660

    Feb 10, 2018

    You don't need minor assistance if you can't develop a lesson, write a lesson plan, manage a classroom, ask questions in a way to elicit the answers you are seeking, interact with students, parents or staff, etc.

    Why don't you directly tell a co-worker that you were never taught how to use the teacher edition of the textbook to create a lesson and see if they will walk you through the book. However, I don't think this will be enough for you. That is the easy part.
     
    Been There likes this.
  19. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I didn't find out I was on the spectrum myself until I was ready to graduate with a master's degree. I was so fed up with the disconnect I was having between being able to take and pass tests and actually apply what I was learning that I stayed up searching and reading until I finally found something that matched my symptoms and thought it might be worthwhile to get myself tested.

    Yes, during grad school, I might have allowed myself to "cheat" on "open-book" tests by looking up the answers once in a while, but I don't think I kept doing this. To be licensed, I still had to take other proficiency tests that wouldn't allow that form of cheating. Plus, I even expressed to my instructors that I felt like I hadn't really "learned" the material. I was told that I knew the concepts they were trying to teach; I just didn't yet know how to apply them.

    Now, I feel like I was "cheated" in the sense that I learned the concept without learning how to apply it. Concepts are easy to learn; it's application that's difficult. I can look at a piece of text that tells me an ESL student is struggling with certain aspects of the regular education classroom, and I can make suggestions that an instructor of a course for ESL teachers would probably accept, grade, and pass me on, but would those same suggestions I made in a learning lab work in a classroom setting with my own students? Maybe not, especially if my main focus is to just concentrate on how to get them, along with about twenty other non-ESL middle school students, to just sit down and be quiet while I try to figure out what I'm supposed to be doing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  20. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I also get that some of the older teachers probably hold the same opinion on this forum that it seems like I've been exposed to. "Why should I help these lazy and entitled "kids?" They've been given so many more opportunities. It's not like Asperger's wasn't a thing when people were my age; they just called it something else, lack of motivation or something, and they found a way through it. Now, these young people today use it as a crutch. They want to be coddled, and the real world just doesn't work like that." I wish people would stop making those assumptions. It isn't seeking coddling to seek help, is it?

    In a way, I sort of feel discriminated against. Admitting to having autism is a red flag to some teachers and employers. Going back to the dishwasher example, it may be the only thing they think people like me are suited for. No matter how much "education" we have, they still realize we're flawed in some way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  21. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Feb 10, 2018

    Who here is saying that you're using your diagnosis as a crutch?

    And, quite frankly, I do think that you are asking to be coddled. You have been given SO MUCH good advice across your many threads, but it doesn't seem like you've attempted to put even one bit of it to practice. You've said repeatedly that you want a canned curriculum, and yet even when people have suggested places like TPT where you can buy a canned curriculum for virtually any core content area and grade level, you've disregarded it. What are you looking for here? Do you want us to come teach your classes for you?

    One of my students on the spectrum used to come to me every day and ask where a certain thing was. The thing was in the exact same place every single day, as it had been for years and years. I told him that he needed to stop asking me the same question every day because I knew that he knew how to find what he was looking for. You know what happened? That kid managed to find what he was looking for. He still sometimes asks me, and I remind him that he already has the resources to figure out the answer for himself, and he goes, "Oh yeah! I remember!" If that middle schooler can get his life together, so can you. Figure it out.
     
  22. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I don't really know where the disconnect is between what I'm really asking and what people assume I'm asking, but apparently it's there, in real life and on this forum, so I guess I'll just go back to Googling for answers and maybe ask a coworker I haven't bugged in a while for help.
     
  23. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Feb 10, 2018

    What are you asking?
     
  24. Tulipteacher

    Tulipteacher Companion

    Joined:
    May 7, 2016
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    91

    Feb 10, 2018

    I have read your posts for months but have never replied.

    1. Buy the book Rookie Teaching for Dummies. No joke. It is a bit outdated. I bought it before I started teaching more than a decade ago. It does the best job of any teaching book I've read about telling you what you need to consider.

    2. Get a free account to NewsELA if you don't already have one and spend some time reading the different leveled articles. Pay attention to the lexile and grade levels of the different articles. Do this until you have internalized what 7th grade reading level is.

    3. Print out all of the TAAKS released tests for 7th grade ELA. Annotate the questions. Print a copy of your state standards and match the questions to the standards. (This is done for you in the TAAKS answer key, but you need to do it yourself so that you learn the standards and learn how to interpret the standards.)

    4. Get over your lack of preparation. Stop thinking about it and blaming others. Education programs are notorious for not preparing teachers with the realities of teaching. You are not unique in this. Move on.

    5. If you have a specific issue, like not understanding how to read the curriculum guide, post the specific part you are having trouble with.

    6. Post a lesson plan to be critiqued here.
     
  25. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    Thanks. Okay. That's what I will try to do.
     
  26. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,671
    Likes Received:
    1,107

    Feb 10, 2018

    (Oh, well done, Tulipteacher!)
     
    Tulipteacher likes this.
  27. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2017
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    147

    Feb 10, 2018

    This is absolutely ridiculous.
    1) Im a young teacher and I cannot comprehend how someone is so unwilling to put forth a 5% effort. It has nothing to do with the age of the teacher.

    2) There are countless examples of people diagnosed with a disability who overcome all their obstacles to meet the abilities of their non-disabled peers. Nobody has assumed you can't do this job because of your disability, but rather because you havent shown any intention of working towards the skills that you feel your disability effects. To suggest we're being discriminatory towards you is insulting and makes me wonder why you keep creating threads and coming back for more?

    3) The reality is nobody is going to train you. Schools don't do this, coworkers shouldnt do this, and we cant seem to do this. So whether you like it or not, you'll have to really start applying yourself through self-teaching if you want to improve. But since you've shown no signs youre willing to do this I'm going to agree with Vickylyn that you quit and start dishwashing. Not because that is all people with ASD are capable of, but because that job is more reflective of the amount of effort you seem to be willing to put into your work.

    I talk to my kindergartners everyday about having a growth mindset... I know, I know, you dont understand the terminology, but it takes a quick google search and if my 5 year olds (some who also have disabilities) can understand it and thrive, there's no reason a grown adult can't as well.
     
  28. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2017
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    147

    Feb 10, 2018

    Watch any athlete at the Olympics discuss the trials they faced perfecting their sport over decades and you'll begin to understand the time and energy and heart ache that people are willing to go through to get better. Anyone is capable of improving if they have the right mindset.
     
  29. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,739
    Likes Received:
    1,660

    Feb 10, 2018

    Improving, maybe. Capable, no. I do not believe everyone, especially those with disabilities can rise to the occasion because the time it would take for them to get there is beyond what the situations can bear.

    The truth is, if all it took was hard work and dedication, everyone would be the fastest runner. However, I've known people who dedicated years and the best they got was to be able to finish the race.
     
    czacza likes this.
  30. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2017
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    147

    Feb 10, 2018

    I agree which is why I said capable of improving instead of capable of mastering. I fully believe it's going to take the OP more time and and effort than it would for a teacher without ASD to feel confident in the classroom. But I guess my point being that you're not going to find an Olympic athlete who just woke up one morning the best at their sport. It requires effort to improve.
     
  31. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,693
    Likes Received:
    2,402

    Feb 10, 2018

    OP, get yourself to a doctor who is qualified to diagnose your supposed ASD label. You are not qualified to diagnose yourself. You build your case for training based on your diagnosis of ASD. Who made you the specialist?
     
  32. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    That's a whole other issue I don't want to get into. I do feel like I haven't been "officially" diagnosed, as it was done by someone in training under the supervision of a doctor. I may look around, but it's actually costly and time-consuming to get evaluated, not all insurance plans cover it, either, but let's not talk about that.
     
  33. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,739
    Likes Received:
    1,660

    Feb 10, 2018

    But no matter how much effort and mindset some may have they will never be able to become competent.

    So, people must know when it is time to put their energy into something they can become competent at rather than keep tying to make minuscule improvement with maximum effort.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  34. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,739
    Likes Received:
    1,660

    Feb 10, 2018

    I believe Kenz implied testing was done.
     
  35. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,485
    Likes Received:
    1,026

    Feb 10, 2018

    Another point here is when you say "Train meh, train meh, train meh!!!!!!", it supports the notion of "those who can't do, teach", and I think most people here abhor that particular slogan. When I managed fast food as a teenager, I could train my employees to ring up orders and make ice cream cones. Teaching is a skill and a talent that is not necessarily in everyone's wheel house, and THAT'S OKAY! Not everyone is a baseball player or an actor either.

    At end of the year you will, in all likelihood, face nonrenewal. Where will you go from there?
     
    a2z likes this.
  36. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    Probably anywhere that will hire me as a teacher, but can we get off of this topic? Sorry if my posts triggered negative feelings, but, like I said earlier, I'm looking for advice, and I'm not trying to pick a fight. Really, I can't name any job I've done where I was perfect at it; I'm just not wired that way, I guess, and I have a lot of trouble asking for help when I don't understand something. With teaching, my errors are more obvious, but every career has a learning curve.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  37. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,739
    Likes Received:
    1,660

    Feb 10, 2018

    That was on topic. Maybe not what you wanted to hear, but it was on topic.

    You can't train a teacher like other help. It doesn't work. A lot is intuition and being able to think on your feet. (on topic) Not everyone is cut out for baseball or acting. (on topic - not everyone is cut out for teaching) And that is okay.

    You will probably be having to look for something else at the end of the year. (on topic - get a plan B ready)

    As you can see, it really is on topic. Point being, people can't necessarily help you with what you want help with. Some of it you either have it or you don't.
     
    TrademarkTer likes this.
  38. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    So...if this were ice skating and I fell and had trouble keeping my balance while performing certain turns, do you think everyone would have the same attitude? I kind of doubt it. I think they would encourage me to keep trying. People aren't born skaters, and people aren't born teachers. I imagine the best probably learn helpful techniques from other people who have already honed their craft.

    I don't get why many people are so negative. I'm having trouble because I haven't mastered certain skills; really, I'm not even sure which skills need to be mastered.

    It's confusing, though, the idea that people can't learn to fit into certain professions due to lacking an inherent skill set, because training is necessary for most people to become proficient at anything. Most of us wouldn't even know how to read or write if we weren't trained to do it at some point.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  39. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,485
    Likes Received:
    1,026

    Feb 10, 2018

    If you were trying to skate to make a living, I would have the same attitude. If you were trying to skate recreationally, it's a different story. People generally don't teach as a hobby. The futures of many children are at stake in this scenario. Imagine if you were a surgeon and had shaky hands? You are a teacher and have social and emotional limitations preventing you from doing the job well. Maybe it's not your fault, but certainly, it's not something you should really be doing.
     
    czacza likes this.
  40. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2016
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    21

    Feb 10, 2018

    I said that I wasn't trying to antagonize, but most teaching is on-the-job training. If you aren't saying that the only people who have the right to be teachers are the ones who already are, what are you saying? Everyone has to learn. I agree that the system in place is flawed; educators should be trained more like doctors are, but that's not reality, and if I want to stay in, I'll have to do like everyone else. Yes, if this system were applied to doctors, I would be afraid to go to a hospital, because students would be using patients as guinea pigs, but classrooms have been doing things this way for years, haven't they? Why should I not give myself the chance every new teacher has given himself?

    It certainly annoys me to read about the "ideal classroom" and the "ideal teacher" and to look across the hall at teachers who have been doing this job for twenty-five plus years and realize that I don't have the tools or expertise to do that, yet, but I still don't believe that means I should give up entirely. I know what I want, and I also know what I can do, if given the opportunity. It's just all of this self-teaching and self-training that I find difficult and frustrating. Mostly, I've been hitting snags that, had I been a sub, would have probably been cleared up in my first week because no one would have just assumed that I already knew what to do.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Ms.Holyoke,
  2. ready2learn
Total: 283 (members: 3, guests: 264, robots: 16)
test