tough kid..full support from parents

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by puff5655, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Nov 9, 2011

    I have an aide who is also a parent of one of my students. We need some help with coming up with a behavior plan for her son.

    He's been doing a lot of pushing and yelling at other kids, and a lot of whining on top of it. She does time outs at home and talks to him about how all this makes other kids feel. We do the same at school. It doesn't seem to be working- yesterday he spit in another kids face at recess, and mom was in tears.

    Any suggestions, or even on books or websites that will be helpful?

    The kid's sweet but he's big for a Kinder and very active.
     
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  3. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Nov 9, 2011

    what is making the child do these behaviors? he might need help in learning how to play with others. praise all the positive things he does. do you have a classroom management program set up like changing cards?
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 9, 2011

    Agreed with the first question from AMK - first place to start with a behavior plan is always a good assessment. Is there anyone involved that might do assessment, such as a counselor? If not, would you need help getting started?
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 10, 2011

    When do these behaviors occur (time of day and type of activity).

    What is happening just before the behavior occurs (find a group, transition, open a book, etc).

    It may be that this child needs a more structured routine for playing with friends or working with others.
     
  6. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Nov 10, 2011

    Before he started school he mainly played with his big brother and older cousins, so he's used to being able to play rough and with mature kids.

    First issue: He definitely needs help with his social skills. If someone's bothering him, he'll impulsively punch, yell at, or (this week) spit on them. It's usually out at recess or while standing in line that this happens.

    Second issue: He's a very active kid. Just can't sit still for the life of him. He has to be touching someone or something at all times. I'm thinking he needs something to keep with him at all times that he can be holding- maybe some sort of fidget toy that can attach to his wrist, or sweater zipper?

    Third issue: Whining. No matter how much we ignore it, it continues. It's a big problem at home especially.

    I would really like to do an assessment and sit down and meet with parents and child and come up with a behavior plan for him. I just don't have the resources to do it, so yes I would really appreciate help! Mom is really worried he's going to get labeled as a "bad" kid, which he is not!
     
  7. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Nov 10, 2011

    ..oh and another issue.. putting things in his mouth. I try to do a lot of hands on stuff with the kids- manipulatives etc.., but he's always putting whatever he's holding onto into his mouth. The sweater he carries around like a blanket is usually soaked in one spot by the end of the day.
     
  8. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 11, 2011

    It may be a sensory issue, especially with recess and lining up being an issue as well as the things in the mouth. Has mom brought up these concerns with her pediatrician?

    Does he struggle more during unstructured or center activities or when the noise level is louder?

    As for the lining up and recess, can you give him a specific place in line everyday, so he has somewhere to be and a job to do? With recess, it might help if he knows what he's going to do before recess and who he is going to play with.

    Definitely get a fidget toy of some kind. There are also pencil top erasers made for students to chew on (much more appropriate than a soaked sweater or class materials).

    I think if you start by helping him with social skills, the whining at school may improve. The more he feels confident and comfortable, the less likely he may be to whine about things.
     
  9. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 11, 2011

    So, the first thing I would do is pick one of these areas to work on. One and three are most likely going to be easier to work on, with the third probably being easier, but less important than the first I'm guessing? You could develop a plan that addresses all 3 at once, but a lot of times starting with one area is good because it shows more progress more quickly, boosts confidence of those involved (you, the child, the parent, the school), and keeps things simple.

    If you pick the first area (reactive physical aggression), I would then come up with a list of behaviors that are included in that category - that tend to occur together, for the same reason, at the same time. Then, I would keep a log of those behaviors, specifically with 4 categories on a piece of paper - from left to right:

    1) "Antecedents/Triggers" - things that happen immediately before the behavior that trigger the behavior's occurrence.

    2) "Behaviors" - specific behaviors that occurred during that particular incident.

    3) "Consequences" - environmental reactions to behavior. So, what you did in response, how peers responded, etc.

    4) "Hypothesized function" - basically, why you think he did what he did - what he was trying to get or get out of with the specific behavior.

    Make an entry for each behavior you notice for a week or so, then start to look for patterns with what you observed. For example, you might notice that each time he hit a child, he was verbally reprimanded, then pulled out of line to stand with you. You might develop a hypothesis that the function (or purpose) of those behaviors was to elicit social interaction from you (the teacher), or perhaps to gain a preferential position in line (e.g., doesn't have to stand in it).

    A way to make data entry a bit more quick is to develop codes for common notes. So, a common antecedent could be peer aggressive state - instead of writing that out each time, you could write "AS-P" (which stands for Aggressive Statement-Peer" - just make sure you keep a list of abbreviations so you remember what they stand for :).

    Of course, if you really already have a sense of exactly what the triggers, consequences, and functions are, you could skip this whole process and move right to the intervention process. If the interventions don't work, you might gather that your initial assumptions might not have been correct, and need to move back into the assessment phase.

    Hopefully at least some of this all made sense - still on my first cup of coffee for the day :).
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 11, 2011

    Do you have a child study team who can send someone in for an informal observation? There's a lot going on with this kiddo!
     

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