Tough Field Experience

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by crazycatlady80, Apr 2, 2016.

  1. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 2, 2016

    Going through a tough field experience. First, the supervising professor is one of the meanest people I've ever met. She has lots of good advice and knows a lot about teaching, but she is a bully. She yells at students during the middle of class. During my observation, the opening and model of my lesson were very good, but she started making rude comments to me and then it went downhill. I won't go into details here what she said, but I will say that it absolutely shocked a lot of friends of mine who have taught for many years. I talked to my advisor. She didn't have any kind of reaction to what I said, which meant she had heard it all before. There are NUMEROUS complaints about this professor, but basically the university can't do anything, because she has tenure. She hasn't threatened to fail me, but she has to numerous people in the class and I'm very concerned.

    Second, my master teacher. Though I disagree with a couple of things she does, she is still an excellent teacher and her advice has been wonderful, but she has an authoritarian streak and very strong opinions when it comes to teaching. She says I'm slowly making progress after a bumpy start. Honestly, the bumpy start was because I had no idea about my expectations of the Field Experience. I just figured they were just observation hours. As someone that just entered the program, I had no idea that even a field experience was required. I asked to meet with her before I started the position to discuss my role, but she refused. She says that I'm wonderful with the kids, but need more experience, which is probably correct, but I'm worried about how this will affect my overall evaluation. Though she admits my professor is extremely mean, they are very close. After my professor observed my lesson, I cried in her classroom, which the master teacher later told the professor. Of course, the department chair (also my advisor) overheard the situation and she informed both of them that I had scheduled an appointment with her. A lot of this information I didn't want to be "public." The professor told her that I had previously attempted the course. That wasn't exactly true. I was in the class for two days last semester, but I dropped out when I realized how much work it is was going to be to take the class and pass my CBEST and CSET. I explained this to the master teacher, but I don't know how much this has sunk in.

    The whole situation is extremely stressful. I think I could handle each one by themselves, but not together. My anxiety level is extremely high. I'm getting really severe migraines. In fact, I had to take a one and a half days off last week, which I know was frowned upon by both the master teacher and the professor. I accept the situation that I'm in and realize that I can't change either one of them, but I'm just trying to figure out how to survive till May. Any suggestions? By the way, I'm not alone in this experience. Many students report having to go on anxiety meds after having that professor.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2016
  2.  
  3. Nab

    Nab Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    25

    Apr 2, 2016

    I'm sorry to hear about your experience. I'm having similar issues. Spring seems to be a terrible time to student teach, and this semester seems to have a lot of people down and full of anxiety. I also find that a lot of mentor teachers and supervisors - around the country - are letting things that should stay private go "public" with a lot of student interns. You kind of have to wonder what is going on in a lot of these programs.

    If they are "leaking" things that should be private - you may want to report that to someone above all of them. Does your university have a Director of the College of Education? Someone above these people. Because, they don't sound totally professional or helpful.

    I'm sorry that you have a horrible supervisor - I'm in a similar boat with mine. My advice would be: do what you have to do, read things (journals, blogs, textbooks, articles) to help you improve in areas you know you are weak in, document everything that your supervisor or mentor teacher does or says (if you can, record meetings with your supervisor).The fact that she openly making rude comments during your lesson (did I get that right? Your teaching the students and she's commenting?) is extremely unprofessional. Other than that, bid your time. You probably have four or five weeks left, right? Just do what you can and try your best. It's your improvement and the students that matter.

    I don't think she can fail you, just because you doesn't like the way you teach or she thinks you shouldn't have cried after a meeting. My understanding is that most programs will only fail you if you show no improvement during the 12-14 weeks of student teaching. Which makes sense, because I have seen some teachers - in their second or third year - who have no business teaching, but they passed.

    Document everything! Just in case you need it later. You and your mentor know if you are improving or not - not your supervisor, who probably has only seen you teach two-three times in three months. Good luck.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,868
    Likes Received:
    740

    Apr 2, 2016

    I had a really bad field experience my junior year. I had an awful professor and a really bad CT at the same time. It was a really hard semester. I remember feeling physically sick over the whole thing a lot. I went to my advisor (my college advisor, not like a student teaching advisor) and explained the whole thing. It was hard to admit that so many things were going wrong, but with my advisor I took the approach that I wanted to "fix things" but needed help to do so. I made sure to just state facts and say that I wanted her advice about what I could improve in and what my next steps should be, without being overly negative or trying to blame the professor/CT (which was really hard, because they had both done some really horrible things). I'm so glad that I spoke up because it gave me the documentation I needed. My advisor had me in class before and knew I was a good student. Even though I didn't want to spend one more minute in that classroom, I agreed to do an additional 3 weeks of field experience (we were supposed to end 3 weeks before the end of the semester) to "get more practice" and show that I was improving. For my additional observation, my CT told me to plan a lesson for a small group of 5-6 students (even though this was a full 3rd grade classroom). I took my lesson plan to my advisor and asked her to look over it with me and let me know if there were areas that I could improve on. When I got to the classroom the day of my observation, my CT gave me a group of 13 students to work with. I looked very foolish because I didn't even have enough supplies for everyone (even though I thought I was bringing "extra" by bringing enough for 10 kids when I was told the group would be 5-6). However, since I had gone to my advisor for help with the lesson, when she read my professor's review later she understood that the CT had set me up. I offered to retake the class and my advisor told me I couldn't because I was getting a good grade (grades were based on tests, which I had done well on). The field experience "grade" was based on a teaching outcome rating scale, which I did extremely poorly on. It stated that I had "done nothing" to address complaints, which thanks to my meetings with my advisor I could prove wasn't true. My advisor told me no action could be taken against me as long as I did okay on the rating scale the next semester, with a different CT/professor. As soon as I got to work with different people everything was completely fine. The experience did teach me that "playing the game" is important and I'm glad it happened when I was student and not when I was a real teacher. I ended up with a wonderful CT for my full student teaching and was actually granted the "apple award" for having the most successful pre-service teaching experience of anyone in my college program. The moral of this story is document, get someone else involved, and present yourself as "wanting to learn/improve" even in cases where whatever the problem is isn't your fault.
     
    Obadiah and bella84 like this.
  5. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 2, 2016

    I spoke to my advisor a couple of weeks ago. She reviewed my lesson and she said it wasn't as bad as I thought and, honestly, it wasn't. I know students who did far worse. In fact, I know of a couple of cases where she told the student that they were doing it all wrong and just took over the lesson. It was the fact that my supervisor made those comments in front of the kids. It is very hard to teach when someone is pointing out to you what you did wrong. I don't mind the feedback after the lesson as long as it is kept professional. She also asked me if I had a certain type of learning disability during the meeting after the lesson. I do, but I never wanted to disclose this information. She does regularly fail students and has said so in front of the class. Though the grading policy is laid out in the syllabus, it does seem a bit arbitrary. She threatened to fail a friend of mine who didn't do so well on her lessons, but got A's on all her other assignments. That doesn't make much sense. I get the impression that there is nothing the school can do. She has tenure, does a lot of research, and brings in a lot of grant money.

    I'm documenting everything. I've saved every single email she has sent me. I do have another class with her in the future. After that class is done, I will probably file a formal complaint. Not that it will get anywhere, but at least I know I stood up for myself.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2016
    Obadiah likes this.
  6. Nab

    Nab Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    25

    Apr 2, 2016

    What? No, that is just totally inappropriate. By doing that, she is basically telling the children that their "student teacher" has no authority and not to listen to her/him.

    She is not allowed to ask you if you have a learning disability. I really hope you didn't disclose that information to her. I really don't believe she allowed to discuss or ask about disabilities with you. If she does so again, I would report her.

    When you know that you are no longer required to be around her, I would certainly file a complaint.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  7. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 2, 2016

    I checked with Disability Services. They said that, legally, she can ask that question, but it isn't "best practice." They are aware of the situation.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  8. Nab

    Nab Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    25

    Apr 2, 2016

    Ah. I know at my university, the Supervisors can be fired for discussing disabilities.
     
  9. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 2, 2016

    Well, now I'm dealing with the fact that she doesn't like my lesson plan, even though the day before I told her what I was doing and she said she liked it. Now she doesn't like it. Plus, it was suggested to me by my master teacher. The assignment is due Monday. I can't submit another draft for her to look at. She is worried that I don't understand how to write a lesson plan, even though I just got some of the pronouns confused. I wrote a 150-page masters thesis, but, according to her, I don't know how to write a simple lesson plan. I just don't know what to do. Plus, I'm finding the whole thing very triggering emotionally. I suffer from PTSD, partly due to my disability and the fact that acted as if it was a big deal is really taking its toll.
     
  10. Nab

    Nab Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    25

    Apr 2, 2016

    Did you tell her it was suggested by your master teacher? Did she point out what she didn't like? Did she give real feedback or did she just say "I don't like it?" If so - is there anyway to change any aspects before or on Monday? Could you make the changes before you teach, and just write - in pencil - the changes that were made and the reasons for the changes? Just to have that documented. For example: "Had students answer questions during PPT, as opposed to after PPT. Changed suggested by [Supervisors Name]. See attached paper for her email, in which this is stated." and than high-light what she suggested be changed or what she said she didn't like in the email.

    I'm really so sorry about this. It's sounds like you are having a really hard time and that this woman is a nightmare. Please look after your health. I know PTSD can be tough on ts own, and it must be tough with this added stress. Is there anyone in your department that you can talk to about her? How much longer do you have with her? Could you be switched to another Supervisor, or is it to late for that? Please know, that - as someone else having a tough time - I'm rooting for you.
     
  11. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,349
    Likes Received:
    834

    Apr 4, 2016

    If I might offer a few suggestions. I was told, first day of field experience (35 years ago), I am a young professional, not just a student, and I agree with you and Nab, commenting on another professional during a lesson in front of the students seems a bit unorthodox. However, different professors have different methods for assisting new teachers. It’s not how I would counsel a new teacher, but she’s probably just trying to mold you into the best teacher possible. It’s kind of like what I’ll be doing soon with a bush outside my house when it’s time to prune it. If the bush had feelings, it wouldn’t enjoy the process, but the end result transforms a beautiful bush into an even more beautiful bush. Judging from your postings, you are on the right track. You recognize the problem and rather than taking the role of a victim, you are seeking to be the victor. I’m assuming this is what the professor desires, too. The key is to use the rough situation as a stepping stone into more positive results.

    I would not advise writing a report against this professor, even after your courses with her are completed. This could come back to haunt you in the future. She might not officially be the one who will recommend you for employment, but she might still be consulted.

    I’m impressed that you are weighing what you observe in the classroom against your own current opinions. Rather than being robotic, you are thinking. When I first started student teaching and especially when I first became a teacher, I had many ideas contrary to what I observed in other teachers, but...many of my ideas and philosophies changed over the course of teaching. Right now, it’s important to learn about many different philosophies and methods.

    Concerning your learning differences, I have found my learning differences to be more of a blessing than a curse. I recognize what other students are experiencing and how to best help them. And if I might be quite frank, many modern students are experiencing PTSS. Not that you will be counseling them, but this and any struggles you experience will shape you into better understanding the emotional needs of your students.

    Concerning lesson plans, keep three words in mind: time, space, and good judgement.

    If I could make an extra recommendation, during your breaks from college, read. Read professional journals and books, and again, use your critical thinking skills to weigh the value and validity of what you read. If possible, attend professional workshops in your local school district; they sometimes allow for students to attend. That way you can rub shoulders with veteran teachers in a more relaxed atmosphere.
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Apr 4, 2016

    I'm curious about this. Why shouldn't a professor be made aware of a student's disability? How is it different from K-12 teachers knowing about a student's disability?
     
  13. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 4, 2016

    In my opinion, the difference is that I'm an adult. It is my choice if I want to disclose it. Before going into teaching, I was a PhD student. I also have a masters degree in Library Science. I never told anyone about my disability. I'm not ashamed of it, but I just didn't feel it was necessary. Nobody knew about it and it NEVER affected my academic performance. It doesn't affect me as it did when I was younger. I did tell her about my math disability, because that affected my placement. Plus, this this is more of an employment situation. Legally, a supervisor is never allowed to ask about a disability.
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Apr 4, 2016

    Your professor is not your employer, so that's not the same thing.

    I wonder what prompted her to ask whether you have a learning disability. Perhaps it affects you work more than you realize. To my recollection no one has ever asked me if I have a learning disability.

    I don't know anything about you or your professor and I have no vested interest. Just offering another perspective.
     
  15. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 4, 2016

    If it did affect me then I seriously doubt I would have gotten this far both academically and professionally. I did contact the state and, as a professor, she is not allowed to ask about a disability.
     
  16. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Apr 4, 2016

    But you just said here that she can legally ask that question.
     
  17. Nab

    Nab Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    25

    Apr 4, 2016

    At my university, Supervisors are not our professors. They are mostly retired teachers (from middle or high school level) or retired researchers. The Supervisors are asked to visit us when we student teach; they visit between four to six times in the fourteen week student teaching period. In our student teaching handbook, there is a section that discusses what the Supervisors may or may not discuss with us - many of which are personal matters. Asking about disabilities is a huge no. The Supervisors are there for a few things:

    To see if we can correctly make lesson plans.
    To see if we can give direct instruction to students.
    To see if we can manage a classroom.
    To see if we can be professional in a classroom setting.
    To see if we can make and give assignments and assessments.

    A mental/emotional/physical/learning disability usually does not come into play for any of these things. So, they are not allowed to ask if we have disabilities or discuss any disabilities they may somehow know we have. The university has already decided that we have the grades and ability to teach - so, disabilities aren't the Supervisor's concern.

    But, that's just my university program.
     
  18. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 4, 2016

    After reading Nab's post, I contacted the Commission on Credentialing here in the state. They told me that they aren't allowed to ask that information.
     
  19. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,468
    Likes Received:
    2,485

    Apr 4, 2016

    It's curious that Disability Services, whose job is to handle the legal issues involving students with disabilities, wouldn't know that.
     
  20. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 4, 2016

    Who knows. I guess the only way to find out is to hire a lawyer, which I can't afford to do nor have any interest in doing.
     
  21. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,349
    Likes Received:
    834

    Apr 5, 2016

    Crazycatlady80, I'm hoping things were looking up a bit, yesterday, in your observation. I was thinking of your situation several times throughout the day.

    I didn't realize how far ahead you are in your studies and career. Wow! We need you in the field of teaching. Your knowledge, ambition, and attention to detail are a valuable asset to pass on to students.
     
  22. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 5, 2016

    Thank you so much. The supervising professor is forcing me to take a medical withdrawal, even though the department chair/advisor gave me the option to have a meeting with her to try to work something out. But, last night, the supervising professor said I need to take a medical withdrawal or she will fail me. She refused to have a meeting with me to discuss this further. With the exception of my lesson plan, all my grades have been outstanding. The sad part is that I have to leave program once the semester is over, because my supervising professor is the only teacher that does the field experience. There is no way I'm going to work with her again. I probably could fight it and get it supervised by another professor, because, according to the diversity office, there are possible grounds for discrimination. She did break the law when she asked me if I had a disability. At this point, I want to move on and start fresh in a new program. I don't want to be "the girl with gets to do her field experience supervised by another professor, because she has a disability." Anyway, I do believe things will work out for the best and will use this incident as a learning experience.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2016
  23. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Apr 6, 2016

    File a complain with the ADA/504 officer at the university. Trust me, it is worth it. I did it when I had a professor who I alleged was discriminatory - which led to the eventually dissolution of the office that only handled students with Learning Disabilities - as they were not providing proper... treatment to students per the law, which led to.... issues.

    Fight it can get supervised by another professor - my first pre-professional field experience went... bad because when supervisor told me he was failing me because "if you can't write, why do you think you can teach?" - he never wrote that down, so what he wrote was taken as word - and at the conference with my adivsor, the head of the placement center, the head of the college of education, and the supervisor, they determined it would be best that I repeat that field with a different supervisor - one that I had to myself.

    You won't be "the girl who gets to do her field experience with another professor because of her disability." You will be "the girl who advocated for herself after a horrible situation."

    Advocacy is nothing to be ashamed of.
     
    Linguist92021 and MissCeliaB like this.
  24. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 6, 2016

    Thank you. Right now, I'm just tired of the whole thing and I need a couple of days to breathe. I'm planning on meeting with my advisor to see what can be done.
     
  25. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Apr 7, 2016

    Being tired is an alright feeling - I am all too familiar with it. If you need help, tips, encouragement, whatever - just PM me. I have been through the ringer - look at my topic I made when I was student teaching for a doozy.
     
  26. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,349
    Likes Received:
    834

    Apr 8, 2016

    I find it beyond comprehension that she would force you to take a medical withdrawal. She is not you--only you can decide that. Back to a previous posting, there is nothing wrong with crying in the classroom. You are you, and the real you is a better teacher than a hypocritical you. Secondly, I agree with you and bros, take some time to unwind. You'll feel better and think more clearly about the situation. Concerning a learning difference or any other difference, that shouldn't enter the picture. If she is discriminating against differences, well, the last time I checked, teachers are people, and every person in the world has a difference of some sort. Some famous achievers with notable differences are Albert Einstein (learning differences), Thomas Edison (Deaf), Jim Abbott (pitcher with 1 hand), David Beckham (pro soccer player with OCD), Patty Duke (actress with manic-depressive disorder), Peter Falk (actor with 1 eye), Stephen Hawking (scientist with ALS), Henry Holden (actor with polio), Geri Jewell (actress and comedienne with cerebral palsy), Marlee Matlin (Deaf actress; a recent "must see" movie is No Ordinary Hero: The Superdeafy Movie); Terence Parkin (Deaf Olympic swimmer), Itzhak Perlman (a fantastic! violinist with polio), Patricia Polacco (children’s author and illustrator, with dyslexia, dysnumeria and dysgraphia), Franklin Roosevelt, (President of U.S., with polio), Marla Runyan, (runner in 2000 Olympics, legally blind), and many, many more.
     
  27. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Apr 9, 2016

    ...dysnumeria?

    Is that a thing? Hm, never heard of it. Let's check google.

    Ahhh, it's a less used name for dyscalculia.
     
  28. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,349
    Likes Received:
    834

    Apr 9, 2016

    That explains the squiggly red line underneath the word. :) The key principle though is that a label doesn't make the person, the person makes the person.
     
    Linguist92021 likes this.
  29. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 9, 2016

    Thanks everyone again for your nice posts. She isn't the first person who has discriminated against me, because of my disability nor is she the last. It is the reason why I'm going into this field.

    I talked to the Civil Rights office at my university. The attorney at the school said she did discriminate against me, because of my disability, but, strictly legally speaking, it wouldn't hold up. In order for it to be discrimination, it has to show that she specifically targeted me. Evidence of that is very slim, because she is rude to everyone, so she is just a really mean lady. Still, I have the office's support, which is nice to know, because it might force the university to work something out. Guess I will have to see.

    Feeling very emotionally drained still, but luckily everyone at the school is being so nice. My other professors are bending over backward to help me get through this semester.
     
  30. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 9, 2016

    I've thought a lot about that over the years and how that relates to me. Having my learning disability, for better worse, was a defining experience for me. It has shaped me into who I am just as much as my parents did or another big event in my life. I just can't imagine life without it.

    As for the labels, personally, I've always found a bit of comfort in them. I first learned about my disability during a school assembly. It was about respecting other people, despite there differences. One of the characters had a learning disability and I realized that is what I had. At that moment, I realized that I wasn't stupid. I realized that I was like my friend who didn't walk. She wasn't stupid because she didn't learn to walk, but rather he brain just didn't work like most people. It was extremely liberating. Then again, I know this is not the case for most people. A lot of students and teachers hate labels and I respect that.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  31. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,768
    Likes Received:
    999

    Apr 9, 2016

    So basically because she doesn't target just one person with a disability, but is mean to everyone, it's not really a legal issue? Ok, I get it. But I think the reason we have laws for protecting certain groups (minority, disability, etc) because those groups might be less equipped to deal with discrimination than those who do not belong to those groups.

    I say fight it, you did nothing wrong, and it shouldn't be you who suffers just because it's too tough. If the office is supporting you, take it. You already got so far, it's not right for her to tell you to take a medical leave (and it's not up to her anyways)
     
  32. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Apr 10, 2016

    File a complaint anyway. You can also look into filing a complaint with your state or regional Office of Civil Rights. Having the feds breathing down their necks can be... helpful.

    If she targeted you because of something related to your disabilities, she discriminated.

    At the least, she'll have something on her record.

    She is not allowed to ask you if you have a disability OR if you have a specific disability, but she is allowed to ask the nature of the difficulties you may have in class.

    I've known I was disabled as long as I can remember, but I didn't know the full extent of what was a result of my disabilities and what was just me.

    The labels help me make sense of things - and give me a way to explain things to people.

    She should definitely fight it. The professor *might* be suggesting medical leave as it might look better on a transcript versus a fail - and she could get her tuition back, but the suggestion itself is offensive and presumptive.

    I filed a complaint against a professor who had tenure and while she was not found to have committed discrimination per the definition in the law, she was required to attend multiple classes on sensitive training and disability law in the context of "please don't open the school up to a lawsuit again."

    However, I think if it were not for certain circumstances, she would have been found to have been discriminatory in her actions.
     
  33. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 10, 2016

    At this point, I'm not fighting the withdrawal. I would if I had the master teacher on my side, but, since she is a good friend of the supervising professor, I don't think it is worth it both physically and emotionally. I know that I tried to work something out, but the professor didn't want to do it. I did all I could do.

    If I fight anything at this point it is to stay at the school without having to take a class from this professor who not only discriminated against me, but caused serious physical and emotional stress. I have an appointment with my advisor on Monday. I will see what she says and go from there. I do know of other people who've left the program because of this professor, but they didn't have a disability, which, as many of you, can open up the school to lawsuits. Guess we have to see.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 146 (members: 0, guests: 129, robots: 17)
test