Too much imagination?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miller59, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. Miller59

    Miller59 Companion

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    Jan 16, 2011

    I'm wondering about one of my students. He's almost 4, but was fairly premature, so he's small. He's very bright. He uses what I think his peers might call baby talk -- "him can do it" - He does have enunciation issues, but nothing too drastic.

    What really causes me concern is this -- he can't talk much about what's real. He has an obsession with mice and bugs and, for the most part, will only talk about the mice or bug parade or what the mice and bugs are doing or some long drawn out story about mice or bugs. The other children are loosing interest in this little guy. He can't join in the games that they are playing very well. When we had a rocket ship and helmets in the room he could play rocket ship. But with less structure -- pure imaginative play with less props --he just can't join in. He even has a hard time answering questions about books, favorite part of the school day, etc without bringing in mice and bugs.

    But -- to give a complete picture - he recognizes all letters and can give a word for each letter, recognizes numbers 1 - 20, and remembers sight words.

    I'd like to help him connect with peers more fully. I'd like to see him be able to talk about his real life experiences a bit more. Any ideas?
     
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  3. annetxa

    annetxa Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2011

    Do you think that this child has enough of a challenge with speech and issues with play that maybe he should be evaluated? I had a child with some speech issues that was just evaluated and they gave me some great ideas to expand play with him. This child also was very smart and knew his numbers and letters. Does this child make eye contact or anything else of concern?
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2011

    It could just be an awkward child. You may want to start documenting though, because it could be something else as well. Always better to have more documentation than not enough.

    It very well could be a speech disorder or even somewhere on the autism spectrum. Do you have a psychologist that your school works with? Maybe someone else should come take a look and offer feedback.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 17, 2011

    For what it's worth, Kira (age 7) sometimes uses the wrong word in the way you describe. (And with a dad who is an English teacher and me as her mom, she hears the correct usage at home I promise!)

    She was tested last year, and it turns out she has an Auditory Processing Disorder. She hears just fine, but it gets mangled on the way to her brain.

    Not that you can or should diagnose anything, just throwing it out there.
     
  6. Pre-K Teacher 1

    Pre-K Teacher 1 Comrade

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    Jan 17, 2011

    Aspergers??

    This sounds like one of the kids I had in my class years ago. He had been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome. I would say his was mild compared to other children I've had the pleasure of meeting who have been diagnosed with Aspergers. I agree, take as much documentation as you can, if you suspect, its good to have lots of documentation.
     
  7. Miller59

    Miller59 Companion

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    Jan 18, 2011

    Thanks all. It's great to get feedback from others.
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Jan 18, 2011

    In the preschool class can you have a unit on Mice, or bugs? This might not get him 20 friends but at least someone would be able to see the bugs he obviously can see in his head. Then perhaps a small relationship could sprout?
     
  9. Miller59

    Miller59 Companion

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    Jan 18, 2011

    WaProvider -- I have thought of that and am planning to do that soon.

    I talked with my mentor today. SHe had done some research, not on too much imagination, but on kids adverse to risk. I wouldn't have thought of that, but when this child's overall behavior is considered in this light it does make some sense.

    He had a very hard time when he joined the class. He still has a hard time with anything out of our routine. Anyways the idea is that maybe he's hanging onto his mice and bugs as a comfort to help him be ok with the unpredictability of school. Sort of like bringing a blankie to school. Sounds a little hokey when I type it here, but it made sense when we were talking.

    Sometimes I wish I could be in their heads for a few minutes just to see the world the way they do.
     
  10. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Jan 19, 2011

    No, it sounds like what I was thinking. Use the mice and bugs theme (when you get to it .... but hopefully soon) to make the school day seem like a bit more of a safe enviornment. Sort of like meeting him half way.

    Then, if he knows facts or stories or anything about mice or bugs that could be "helpful" don't forget to ask him and give him the floor. Perhaps, rather than him having to give up the comfort image to play space ship or cars or puppets he can have a friend play mice and bugs.

    Then find regular ways to include the mice and bugs in the regular day like when singing "The Wheels on the Bus" for whatever reason ask him...."if mice were on the bus what would they say?" and there are plenty of books at my library about "other things" on the bus like zebras and so on that could help with the shock factor to other teachers and his peers.

    I think it could be a useful bridge. The challenge will be to get him to walk on this bridge and not expect everyone else to walk to him....so to speak.
     

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