Too many Bosses in Educational Kitchen

Discussion in 'General Education' started by titansrst, Feb 24, 2008.

  1. titansrst

    titansrst Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 24, 2008

    This is a continuation from another thread, and it pleases me to see that so many colleagues are as disugusted as I am about the outsiders who think their remedies to our country's education problems are as simple as attaching some silly acronym (NCLB), adding more tests, paying students to get good grades, etc.
    I read every article I can on our education problems and no where except from the mouths of educators do I hear that the real problems stem from a growing disrespect of education and educators, as well as parents who for a variety of reasons do not get involved. Moreover, our country's moral, ethical and legal malaise has hurt. What are we teaching our kids? That we cheat the rules of major league baseball and still receive millions of dollars and standing ovations (see Barry Bonds); that the laws of our land can be flouted in any direction depending on wealth; that you can be one hell of a criminal, yet be the subject of a major box office film (see American Gangster) while real achievers (like the black swim team portrayed in Pride) gets little notice; that every criticism is subject to a racist or anti-Semitic or anti-somebody tag; that our Presidential primaries are being decided not by deeds and achievements, but by rhetoric, innuendo and image smearing; that cheating devices for the classroom receive major publicity and sales on television; that children rule the roost instead of parents who succumb to a variety of surrender excuses. I can go on and on. I love teaching, even if my classroom sits in a roach-infested ghetto. My kids are beautiful, not perfect, but beautiful. But each day the message of hope I send out is harder for them to hear.
     
  2.  
  3. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,494
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 24, 2008

    Well said!
     
  4. TeachUSWrite

    TeachUSWrite Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 24, 2008

    I think the real problem is that the Educational System in America is behind like 40 something years. We are in the information age, and are still teaching skills relevant to the industrial age. It is pathetic. We are not preparing our children to be successful in life, but preparing them to be victims of an ever expanding global society. Many of our children will not have many choices for jobs as they are being outsourced to India, China, and Indonesia. We need to start changing the structure of our curriculum to reflect today's global flatness. Teach kids to speak a variety of languages, and be able to translate information. Teach kids how to create websites and deal with ecommerce. Teach kids how to think and problem solve real life issues. Teach kids how to WRITE! That is the most important thing which keeps being sent to the back burner to other academic subjects. Its a major problem which needs to be solved. I love teaching, and have taught in all type of school environments. I love children, no matter what they look like, act like, or sound like. They all need love and some real guidance to help them in their bright futures.
     
  5. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,494
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 24, 2008


    That is what NCLB should be about!
     
  6. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,858
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 24, 2008

    I agree about the languages. All the research says kids are most ready to learn and retain new languages when they are very young--when do we start teaching them here - in high school. We are the only country that does that and the only one where a majority of the people only speak one language.

    I think we will always be behind with the technology instruction simply because of funding. There are still a lot of schools who have old computers or worse none at all.
     
  7. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,947
    Likes Received:
    34

    Feb 24, 2008

    One thing that makes education more successful in other countries is a national set of standards, everyone learns the same thing in grade 6 or 9 or 12. The standards are not state based but national based. Then all the resources are based on one standards set, it streamlines the process. In addition the tests that are used like the A levels in England, have meaning to the kids, they are not just meaningless standardized tests that grade the teacher, the tests impact the kids lives and their sucess is celebrated because they did something for themselves by doing well. (Oh, and the schools get a snapshot of how well they are doing in the process, cool how that works huh?)

    We need to take apart our system. One simple example. My county has 13 school districts, 13 superintendents, the combined salary of those supers is over 1.5 million. We have 8 school districts that are so poor fundamentals are not being taken care of, like text books newer than 10 years (when you can find atlases and globes with the USSR on them easier than current ones, there is a problem) and building maintenence.

    Too much control at the top, and at the wrong level of top...when are we as americans going to demand that when we move our kids are not a year or two behind or ahead because of different standards??

    Oh, and that standardized tests, every single one does something for the kids that has meaning and value....or otherweise test them on a portfolio basis. Standardized tests are so removed from a direct impact on kids lives it shouldn't be surprising that kids with low school motivation anyway draw pictures with the bubbles, give up and don't try, or worse, fall asleep and drool on the test!
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,560
    Likes Received:
    2,654

    Feb 25, 2008

    One other thing that makes education so successful in other countries is that kids are basically booted out of middle school if they can't cut it or aren't smart enough. In many places you have to basically apply for high school, whereas we in this country are obligated to provide the opportunity for all students to receive an education through 12th grade. I'm certain that our test scores, at least for high school, would be higher if we weren't obligated to keep low achievers around.

    Another thing: in many other places, students with special needs aren't given the same services or services which even sort of approach the ones we offer here.

    I think these are definitely a couple of things we do right here, and we should keep that in mind.
     
  9. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,858
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 25, 2008

    The kids don't even get to see what answers they got wrong to learn from their mistakes - they just get the overall score. It's given purely for the numbers, which is really not meaningful to some kids. My Kinders certainly don't understand their test scores.

    I also agree with the fact that the wrong people are in charge of creating the guidelines. We currently have a Secretary of Education with a Bachelor's degree in Political Science and no direct education experience-none. She's been in politics her whole life.
     
  10. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Feb 25, 2008

    Kinder, I think that would change a lot if the position of Sec of Education was someone with education experience. I believe that window is like 2-4 years old. My daughter has picked up some spanish, but not near enough.

    wldywall, I completely agree 110% that we need to have national standards across the board. It would make it easier for students to transfer schools and would give us a better picture of what's going on.

    I think we are at a disadvantage opposed to other countries because we have to give every student an education regardless if they are capable of learning or not.
     
  11. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,947
    Likes Received:
    34

    Feb 25, 2008

    That is not entirely correct in Europe, yes low performing students do not get into gymnasium (high school) but they are put into a vocational program to learn a skill. Otherwise their social welfare service would be overwhelmed with people without the skills for the jobs available. The students are tracked, and I am not saying that it is good all the time. But education is free through college and the students that get to college are successful at it. Some of the kids that end up on vocational programs wanted to be there in the first place.

    Trust me with all the uproar I witnessed living in Germany when the schools and the national language board wanted to change the use of the double s (that funny looking b shapped letter) from elementary schools. Oh, my everyone in the nation was ticked off or totally for it. Trust me, kids in European schools are not left wandering at the end of middle school. (I also have a friend that went to elementary schools in the U.K, France and Belgium, oh in South Africa too)
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2008

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. VAMath
Total: 402 (members: 2, guests: 372, robots: 28)
test