Toilet Training

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by inhisgrip20, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Nov 16, 2007

    HELP!

    I teach students with severe/profound intellectual disabilities. This is my 3rd year teaching. I have five students this year. Two of my students came to me already potty-trained if they are taken on a schedule. Two other students I feel could be potty trained but it's just not working for me. They sit on the potty but they just won't put anything in it. What techniques have been successful for you potty training students with intellectual disabilities. PLEASE HELP! Any and all suggestions would be appreciated.

    Liz
     
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  3. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Nov 16, 2007

    There's a little boy in the classroom nextdoor to me who was never able to poop in the potty. One day, another kid they were working on potty training came back into the classroom after pooping in the potty. The teacher said "yay ____ great job!!!!" and gave him a candy bar. The other little boy was like, "can dee?? can deee?" And the teacher said "if you go poop in the potty, you can have a chocolate bar too!" (She was kind of joking???) But bless his heart, he ran out of the room, and pooped in the potty. Came back chattering "its a can dee?? can dee?" Haha. Good work little guy.

    I'd say extrinsic motivators work pretty well in my experience. I worked in a severe autism unit back in VA and we trained three of the kids using immediate rewards like m&ms and small toys/prizes.

    Have you done toileting charts with them? To find out what times of day they most often toilet? Then you can take them in there and let them sit during that time (as long as they will tolerate sitting on the potty). We go every half hour in my classroom. It seems tedious, but the kids have gotten the hang of it. Mine are all toilet trained now (severe to profound is next door to me, I am moderate to severe) -- but if we miss one of the scheduled potty breaks, one of mine will still have accidents.

    Even if they go the slightest little bit, immediate reward! Have something in your hand to give them, whether it's a sticker, toy, game to play with, prize, video, etc.

    Good luck!
     
  4. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Nov 16, 2007

    Yes, I've done toileting charts with them and took them every 30 minutes. But they won't put anything in the potty. :( One of my little boys (7 years old) is so capable...I really think he could learn but he has lots of behavior problems and nothing seems to motivate him. The only "reward" that motivates him to work is being able to jump on the trampoline. He is a very picky eater and doesn't like sweets at all so he is not motivated by food at all. I have seriously thought about putting one of those bed-wet buzzers in his underwear so I know exactly when he's wetting and I can rush him to the potty. Has anyone ever tried this??
     
  5. slickchik

    slickchik Rookie

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    Nov 17, 2007

    Intensive potty training works extremely well.

    If you don't know what it is, look it up and learn more about it. I use it to potty train my 2-3 year olds with autism, some of them are non-verbal.
     
  6. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2007

    Are you referring to the method developed by Azrin and Foxx? Isn't this very time consuming? How long (days? weeks?) of this intensive training does it usually take for your student to be successfully potty trained?
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Nov 18, 2007

  8. slickchik

    slickchik Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2007

    I'm not sure the one my school uses. I'll briefly explain it.

    Phase 1: The child is in the bathroom all day. They sit on the potty for 10 minutes and then the chair for 5. During this time they need to be drinking lots of liquids. This is helped because you are giving them dry pants checks when they are on the chair, and their reward is a salty treat like goldfish. When they pee on the potty they get something amazingly rewarding. Once they pee on the potty 3 times in a row in under 1 minute and keep dry pants they move onto phase 2.

    Phase one can last from an hour to 2 days...it depends on the child.

    Phase 2: Same as phase 1, but they are on the chair for 10 minutes and the potty for 5. During this time you are helping the child to self initiate by prompting them to say "I want potty" etc, or if they are non-verbal they can simply stand up to indicate that they need to go. Once they have self initiated 3 times and kept dry pants they move on to phase 3.

    Self initiating is the whole point of this, we want kids to be able to go when they need to, not just when a teacher takes them.

    Phase 3: This phase is different for every child. If the child needs some more time working on self initiating you can move the chairs further away from the potty, and each time they self initiate at that distance you can move it even further. Once they are self initiating without any prompting, they are ready just play somewhere near the bathroom but they don't have to sit on the chair. After some time, depending on the child they can finally start moving away from the potty to other areas, with dry pants checks about every 15 minutes.


    I've seen kids be potty trained in 1 day with this method. The most severely autistic child I've seen was potty trained in a week and a half. Yes, it is intensive.....but it works extremely well. We've potty trained hundreds of autistic kids this way with great success.


    This was just a summary....there's more to it, but it gives you the gist of things.
     
  9. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2007

    teachersk--comic you posted--lol--i can appreciate that one!
     
  10. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2007

    Okay...yes, I've heard of this...there is a book about it that I could probably get my hands on to get all the details. So we are in school for seven hours a day. Would the student be in the bathroom the entire 7 hours sitting either on the potty or on the chair? Can they play with anything during their 5 minutes off the potty? I really want this one student in particular potty trained. I feel sure he's capable of learning but he just doesn't get the concept of what he's supposed to do on the potty. The most difficult part of this intensive training (besides the fact that it's so time-consuming) would be finding something to reward this student with. He is not motivated by food, praise or any toys. His biggest motivation is jumping on the trampoline or riding the scooter board. We use these for his rewards.
     
  11. slickchik

    slickchik Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2007

    They can read books and have toys if needed, but usually you are talking to them so much and making it fun so they don't usually need toys....depends on the kid.

    They learn the concept fast this way because they are drinking so many liquids that there is a high chance they will pee on the potty. It usually doesn't take long for them to learn how to control this and pee right away when they get on the potty.

    The child I just potty trained was not easily reinforced either....we set up one of those bouncy houses in the hall. Let me tell you.....a great reinforcer makes things go MUCH faster. Once they learn how to push out pee whenever they want they will push out pee over and over just to get that really cool reward.

    That reward is faded out as it becomes more routine for the child to initiate going potty. Then you can probably just use something like skittles, or a cool toy to keep them going.


    I also had to train the parents how to do this at home, because the child needs to be doing this all day until they go to bed. You can do a home visit the first day if your job allows it, or just have them come in early to pick the child up so you can show them how to do it.

    It takes a lot of energy but it is well worth it!
     

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