Today was a little better...Still need help. :(

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Sep 6, 2011

    I have never had a class like this before...

    I have about 5 boys who feed off of each other terribly. They are very disrespectful with almost everything that we do, that I don't even know where to start. For example, every time we gather as a class on the carpet, they talk to each other. When I separate them, they still "talk" to each other from across the carpet (make faces, laugh, etc.). If I send them back to their desks the behavior continues. Today I kept all of them in for recess for a little chat about begin respectful, appropriate times to act silly, etc. Well, right after recess (they had about 10 minutes outside), the behavior was even worse.

    I just feel so disrespected. I feel like they think I'm a joke. They are testing me, and in a way I feel like they are winning. I honestly do not know what to do with them. As far as behavior management goes, I try to follow the Responsive Classroom Approach with logical consequences. If the behavior is a minor thing (such as side conversations) they will get a warning. If it continues, I write in their responsibility logs (a district-wide policy), and there is a natural consequence. Usually the consequence is that part of recess is spent practicing the correct behaviors.

    However, as I mentioned, they are doing incorrect behaviors ALL DAY with almost EVERYTHING we do. It's so frustrating. I feel so bad for the other children in my class who want to learn. I can't even make it through even the shortest books without stopping 5+ times for them to be quiet. They are also disrespectful with other children's things. Today they were taking pencils from other kids and rubbing them on the sides of their desks to rub the paint off.

    So, what would you do with 5 boys who are consistently inappropriate all day long? :confused:
     
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  3. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Sep 6, 2011

    Fun stuff! So, for a bit more information, could you describe what you think is happening inside their heads (e.g., why they are doing what they are doing, how they perceive their behavior), and a bit more about the individual players (e.g., do they all play the same role, or is one more of a instigator, with 2 or 3 being followers?).
     
  4. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Sep 6, 2011

    Call home and see if there could be consequences at home if these children continue to be disrespectful towards you and not focused on their learning. Some kids really shut up and behave when their parents are aware of what is going on.
     
  5. sjnkate

    sjnkate Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2011

    Sorry this is so long. I have a hard time condensing posts when I am explaining something. :)
    I think it's important to have a positive reinforcement system along with any consequences you have. Have you ever noticed when you are passing something out that if you make a big deal about one student saying thank you the next ten students will say thanks?
    Last year I used a system I found online where students could earn beads that they kept on a pipe cleaner. At the end of the week we did 15 minutes of fun centers and the students with the highest beads would get first pick. It worked pretty well but I prefer the reward system I'm using this year. I got it from a teacher I observed as part of a summer workshop. I cut up pieces of recycled paper into tickets and give them out constantly throughout the day. I may give out 100 tickets in one day. The great thing is that it doesn't matter how many tickets you give out because at the end of the day you only draw five tickets and those five students go to treasure box (always five different students, if I draw a name twice I put the second ticket back and draw another name). If students are having a rough day they are told that I will not be able to draw their name today (if I do draw their name it does not count). To keep them interested in earning tickets students are allowed to save tickets for the next day. Losing treasure box for the day is enough of a deterrent to quell wrong behavior, but knowing that they can save any future tickets for the next day gives them a reason to continue good behavior to try to earn more tickets.
    I keep my treasure box full by allowing students to pick one toy out when they bring me two. In the past few weeks I have given out 50 prizes but my treasure box is just as full as the beginning of the year because kids love trading in their unwanted toys for a new one.
    Another thing I used when I taught second grade was refocus. I had two designated areas in the class where students would go when they needed to refocus. At the refocus area they would fill out a sheet that asks what their behavior was, what they wanted when they did that behavior, what they can do instead next time, and if they are ready to return. It worked well because it required students to reflect on their action and why they were doing it. I had a red and green sign in refocus. Students would turn the sign to green when they were ready to come back but had to be invited by me to return. They also knew that I would invite them back if the sign was still on red if I needed to, though I tried not to do this often.
    This year I also have a behavior chart in each student’s homework folder that is signed nightly by a parent. Students can get a smiley face, a working on it face, or a straight line face (which results in a note). I only give a working on it face or a straight line face if I feel the problem was not adequately addressed in class and needs to be followed up on at home. I don't want students going home and getting sent to bed early or put in an hour long time out if the behavior was handled in class. Students take the behavior chart seriously since they know parents will check it nightly.
     
  6. jleardini

    jleardini Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2011

    Kate -
    Love your answer! LOVE IT! I was thinking the same thing.

    DP -
    2 ways to approach this -

    Group (My personal favorite)
    I put the desks into groups of *insert # here* and keep track of table points. Each time a table group is doing something that is "scholarly", they get a point. At the end of the day, the groups that make a certain point threshold get a reward - More computer time, time with upper grade/lower grade buddy, class store, etc. This will get you some help, because the other students in the group aren't going to let one member of their group mess up their chances at a reward. You can put each of the boys in a separate group and pair them with a strong student, or you can put the boys in a group together and if they aren't earning rewards, they will step it up (you have to make sure that the rewards are something they would really want)

    Individual
    When I first started teaching, the teacher before me had a pocket chart up on the wall with everyone's name on a pocket with 6 different colored slips of paper and they had to change a color everytime they did something wrong. For many reasons I didn't like this at all. I changed the system that they got to change a color if they did something "scholarly" and when they got a certain color, they got rewards.

    I promise if you do this, you will see a marketable change in their behavior.
     
  7. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Sep 6, 2011

    Sounds like the group I had last year. And I moved up with them this year but only have 3 of them, 2 moved. This year I began the year being really tough, not giving an inch. They get 1 reminder, then a 10 minute think about it from recess or whatever fun activity we'll be doing, next their desk is moved to another area & they are no long a member of our class; with this I let them know when they choose to change the behavior & be a participating member of our class they may rejoin us (after a minimum of 15-20 minutes), the next time a letter goes home letting the parent know the child has chosen to not be a participating member of the class & will have an in class time out the following day. Through out the times desks are moved, they must do all work but may not participate in any way.
    The first week of school we spent a lot of time on rules & still do. I read the class code of conduct rules 1 at a time & they repeat them. We discuss each one & what types of behaviors fall within each. Also, if a child plays with things in his desk, I turn the desk around. I do not correct them or warn them at this point, I just turn it keep going with whatever we're doing.
    I decided I can't go through another year like last & it's certainly not fair for the others or the parents paying for their children to be in our school. I would rather be really tough now &maybe be able to let up a bit later.
     
  8. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Sep 6, 2011

    Do you have any type of school-wide reward system? Tickets or something like that? I've found students love those beyond just about anything in a classroom reward situation.

    Also, what about behavioral contracts? Since you have 5 of these students, maybe you could make up a simple form with a graduated behavior level (talked to less than three times, more than 5 times, etc) that goes home for parent signature? However you design it, set up something like a sticker chart where they can earn visible points for good behavior and see accumulation of stickers. If you have parents onboard, maybe a reward at home or at school after a good week? It might work better than taking away recess, since they don't seem to care about that.
     
  9. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Sep 6, 2011

    I think since it is boys, you might try some kind of competion between them. One that comes to mind is a simple dot-to-dot where each of them gets the same one with about 30 dots and you fill in the dots from one to 30 one at a time for great behavior. When they complete it, they get a prize, you might need to probe a little to see what they like and you can even keep it vague while you figure that out, just refer to it as a really great prize. If you need to you can have mini incentives for every 5 spots filled. The important part here is that you have a private meeting with them to encourage a competion, who can fill it up the fastest and that kind of thing. I keep them inside of folders so that only the student and I can see it, but there is no real reason everyone couldn't do this at first and then just continue it with the 5 that need it.

    Some popular no-cost prizes:
    Lunch with the teacher in the room
    Lunch with a friend in the room
    Extra recess - go out with another class so twice in one day
    Extra computer game time - like during read aloud time
    Be the teacher - let them present a "lesson" about something they are really interested in, like dinosaurs or cars (teacher gets a preview of the lesson first ;))
     
  10. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Sep 7, 2011

    Thanks for all of the replies! I just skimmed them quickly, but I will read them over more closely tonight. :)

    Today is ok so far...I spent my 1 hour prep meeting with different people to discuss 7 different students (!). I didn't get to make the 3 parent phone calls I wanted to make...I only had to keep 3 kids in from recess for a bit to talk about behavior (one boy put another in a head-lock and then 2 were hitting him to get the boy out :().
     

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