Today my P told me I have to be meaner

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TerriInCa, Sep 6, 2012.

  1. TerriInCa

    TerriInCa Companion

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    Sep 6, 2012

    Today my P told me I have to be meaner to my students. :help:

    So I work at a school where students are never allowed to talk above a whisper (unless a teacher has called on them to answer a question).

    Of course this was not told to me until now the 3rd week of school.

    I let my students talk softly while materials are being passed out. Apparently this is not allowed. I let my students talk softly during art projects. This is not allowed either.

    We eat inside and students must whisper while eating. This is difficult for my second graders. But I am working on it with them and they are improving. Just not fast enough for my P.

    I have come to the conclusion that I have to get my students to never talk for the rest of the school year if I am to keep this job till June.

    I have tried using hand signals to quiet students. I have tried using a bell. I have taken away minutes of free time.

    I need suggestions that aren't yelling. That is what my P means by being "meaner" she wants me yelling at these kids like the other teachers do. I am trying very hard to not follow their ways.

    I prefer using consequences for their behavior and giving rewards for good behavior. But I have been told now that is not enough.

    I am strict, but not mean. :help:
     
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  3. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Sep 6, 2012

    Yelling at kids to be quiet does not work.

    The best way to quite a class is to take your voice out of the equation.

    I type what I want to say on the computer which is projected on a screen. They all read it chorally.

    Try that and see if your principal has a problem. If so, then you might want to start looking for another job, (even though it's your principal who needs to be looking for another job).
     
  4. Ilovesummer

    Ilovesummer Companion

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    Sep 7, 2012

    It seems unreasonable to expect the students to be that quiet all the time. I like my room to be quiet when the kids are working, but kids are going to make some noise while they are learning - it's natural!
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I'm sorry that school sounds kinda crazy.

    I agree with the the poster who suggested to have the kids say things out loud. You gotta let them talk a little here and there, absolutely no talking is ridiculous.
    If you can look through Whole Brian Teaching's strategies, they use a lot of talking, but it's all on topic; as well as think-pair-share, etc. Hopefully the P won't have a problem with that.

    If you let them do this, then it probably would be easier to have them quiet when it's 'quiet time' :)
     
  6. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Sep 7, 2012

    A class of silent second graders would creep me out. Does that P hate kids or something?
     
  7. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Sep 7, 2012

    Seriously! I mean, I'm pretty strict about kids being quiet during certain times such as during reading time (I mean, they can still whisper read or they can share a part in their book with their friend). Or during a quiz/test. Otherwise, my kids can talk as long as it's appropriate indoor volume. I think your school is way overdoing this.

    And for the principal to ENCOURAGE yelling!!! That's ridiculous. Any good teacher knows that you don't manage/run a class by yelling. You do it through respect and being stern/consistent/fair/loving. It's the second week of school and my kids already get this. They behave very well, and I do this all through, gasp, no yelling. Sheeesh!
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I completely agree.
     
  9. lovely222

    lovely222 Rookie

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    Sep 7, 2012

    lol Molly Doll. I was eating while reading this thread and so glad I didn't choke while I was laughing so hard. Too funny. It does kind of sound like she hates kids and if a class is too quiet, they are probably up to something lol :lol:
     
  10. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I'm baffled by the no talking rules and wonder what the premise is behind this "rule".

    If the consequences and positive rewards you have are being questioned, this makes me wonder what support you have from your principal and what consequences and rewards you have.

    You have to have a classroom management that works for you and your beliefs, and that work with the school beliefs as well.

    That being said, I've had the best of luck with positive reinforcement in all situations--thanking those who are willing to learn, doing their best, standing quietly, just being a great kid. I use some of the whole brain teaching strategies....kids mimic my voice when I say "Class..." at different voice levels.

    Best wishes!
     
  11. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I don't teach ELEM, but I teach 6 & 7 grade Social Studies and I also believe in silent classrooms and our school pushes for silent hallway transitions although the kids can talk during lunch.

    I am a big believer in "only speak when spoken too" in the classroom so students can't talk unless I call on them. Since the kids at my school can be pretty wild, allowing them to talk while working is asking for problems (whisper means nothing to them). My school doesn't mandate that the kids can't talk in the classroom, but they prefer silent classrooms to classes where everyone is talking because the conversations usually get off topic quickly and are LOUD/rowdy.
     
  12. linswin23

    linswin23 Cohort

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    Sep 7, 2012


    I did this today and it's magical. I didn't have them read it outloud, but I think they liked the fact that I can type SUPER fast.


    ***

    I think it's pretty ridiculous that your P expects your kids to NEVER talk. They are little 2nd graders for goodness sakes!
     
  13. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I teach second grade and most of the time, honestly, I expect my kids not to talk. They are to enter the room quietly in the morning and begin morning work quietly. They are to stay quiet during the time we are going over morning work and while I am teaching Spelling, then Language, then Writing...etc. They can't talk unless I specifically give them permission to talk. They are allowed to whisper as long as I can't hear their "voices.

    They ARE permitted to talk during lunch, recess, group or partner work, etc.

    Even though this sounds harsh, it's truly the ONLY way to keep the kids under control. If you set up an environment where they only speak when given permission, there is no guessing about when they can talk or can't talk.

    My kids are having issues lately with talking during transitions, so a lesson in how to move from one activity to another is in order. I don't mind whispering as long as it doesn't interfere with instruction, but 22 kids talking in an inside voice about what we're having for lunch isn't acceptable.

    I also don't allow them to come up to my desk "uninvited," to ask me questions, etc.

    Fortunately, we do some kind of group work or partner work or play educational games every day and kids are encouraged to speak during instruction, individually, when sharing what they've written or justifying their work in Math, etc.

    Is that mean? :mellow:
     
  14. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I have found that I am having much better success with my students being quiet when necessary by using cooperative learning structures (aka Kagan). This allows for a greater percentage of student engagement, because they discuss things we are learning with their (1) shoulder partner, (2) face partner, or (3) table group. If a child is at the computer station, s/he is not allowed to talk - which makes sense, because they are wearing headphones to hear the computer, and would have to yell over it, lol. Table groups are to speak in a whisper, so that I can't hear specific voices from across our room. If I need a student to answer a question, I expect their "answer" voice, which is a little louder (loud enough for everyone to hear without yelling). I allow one instance of "outside voices" when teaching expectations - they are allowed to yell for 30 seconds. After that, the only time they are allowed to talk like that is on the playground. An engaged classroom of students is not silent. There is a definite hum to it. If students get out of hand (and believe me, they do), I simply stop, reteach the expectations, and have them practice before we move on.
     
  15. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Sep 7, 2012

    Today, my students were chatterboxes!

    In a very calm voice, I said, "I'll wait for you to stop talking. For every minute I have to wait, though, I'll take a minute away from your recess."

    I didn't have to wait very long.

    I never yell or talk over anyone.
     
  16. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I'm very picky about voice levels in my room. All of my procedures include voice level, which also includes appropriate topics of conversation and length of conversation.

    I don't yell. My kids this year must come from a history of yelling teachers because it really seems to bug some of them that I haven't yelled. One even told me my quiet voice was creepier than yelling. When I'm really angry I use my man voice. The kids this year haven't heard that one yet. I save it for special occasions.

    I don't remember being allowed to talk very much at all in elementary school. However, it does seem odd that the principal would demand the whole school operate that way. Then again, I know how much I hate it when I get a group of kids who just came from a teacher who allowed them to talk too much and too loudly. They drive me crazy.
     
  17. TerriInCa

    TerriInCa Companion

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I am determined to get the results she wants using a method that doesn't require yelling.

    I prayed about it and spent most of the night and train ride to work working it out how I could do what she wants with out turning into a yelling machine like she wants.

    Today I pulled out a set of gingle bells and used that as an attention symbol. I told the students I would be counting after I ring the bell and they have to be quiet before I reach 5 or the would loose a minute of recces. I also gave table points to groups that were quiet the quickest. It worked.

    But of course my P was never around my side of the building today to notice. Hopefully next week she will see it working.
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Sep 7, 2012

    I was thinking about this earlier today. My kids are SO chatty and it's hard for me to determine what's "right" about what is acceptable or not. It drives me nuts that every time I pass out materials or ask them to get a book out, they start talking. When I say "voices off in 3, 2, 1" they get quite immediately, but it bothers me that I have to do it every time...and then I wonder if it's really something to worry about or if I'm just being too picky. If I see them talking during a lesson/when I'm talking, they flip their card. I do TONS of turn and talks, so it's not like I'm asking them to be silent for very long at all. If I see them talk during a test, they automatically lose their second/afternoon recess. I know in middle school/high school they'll get a 0 on the test for this, so I want to set up the expectation of complete silence during the test with serious consequences. We review this before every test and I explain that you don't talk for ANY reason, even to ask for a pencil or something, and that all questions need to be directed to me, so I feel that there is no excuse.

    I agree about the yelling. One, I'm just not a yeller. I would feel ridiculous yelling. Two, I think it's totally ineffective. I might start doing the recess minutes thing (I take away one minute for every minute you talk) because I feel like I need to step it up for them talking during instruction. I haven't done it so far because I hate the idea of whole class consequences since it's so unfair to the kids that are following the rules. Also, second recess is only 10 minutes, and kids that flip their cards to a certain point are already missing it, so they might be thinking that it doesn't matter if they talk/the whole class loses minutes because they're already losing their recess anyway.
     

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