To Write or Not To Write A Follow-up Email; That is the Question

Discussion in 'General Education' started by LilMitsuko, Jun 15, 2016.

  1. LilMitsuko

    LilMitsuko Rookie

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Hi all,

    I've applied to roughly 30+ schools so far, and while I've received some responses (the "Sorry, we hired someone already" ones), I haven't heard anything from the other schools yet (especially the ones whose application windows have closed).

    I read a long while ago that sending a follow-up email can be annoying and make the hiring committee irritable, so I was holding back from doing so. But a friend of mine suggested I send them one a week or so after the application deadline passes just to show them I'm still interested in the position.

    What do you guys think? Is sending follow-up emails a good thing to do? Or is it best to refrain from doing so?
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 15, 2016

    I'd send thank you notes but not follow up emails. If they're interested, they'll contact you. :2cents:
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jun 15, 2016

    I think this is a toss-up and heavily depends on your area. How saturated is the job market where you are? In my hometown area, schools will literally get thousands of applicants for a single position. Most applications/postings specifically said not to contact the school after submitting your application; some even said doing so would result in your application getting thrown out. In that area, that makes sense because if even 1 in 10 applicants decides to try to follow up, they are inundated with calls/emails and that would get really annoying.

    In my current area, it's not very saturated at all and the most popular positions might have 20-30 applicants. In that case, I think it's okay to send a follow up, but I would do it as soon as you submit your application, not a week after the window has closed. If you wait a week it's likely they've already chosen people to interview. I know people in my area that feel they got their current position because they sent a personal email or came to the school in person.
     
  5. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jun 16, 2016

    I don't really think any extra follow-ups are bad. I think you probably should if you feel you should. I doubt any hiring committees are going to say "throw this candidate out. She e-mailed me too much."

    The bottom line is that you want to stand out in some way. I used to do things by the book, and I never got called in to interview. When are started breaking the rules (e.g. I would pop in to schools), I finally got interest.
     
  6. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Jun 18, 2016

    I wouldn't send follow-up letters weekly. That would get very annoying and probably result in the opposite of what you are after. I might send one if some time has past and I hadn't heard anything though. Just one.
     
  7. LilMitsuko

    LilMitsuko Rookie

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    Jun 19, 2016

    The job market can be pretty tough where I am, especially since tons of people want to live and work here. I haven't seen anything that says "no e-mails" but I suppose I can hold off until it's been quite a long time since I've heard anything. Some schools I applied to in April or the beginning of May and I haven't heard anything yet.

    Yeah, I wouldn't send weekly follow-up emails. But I mean, just one to see where things are currently, you know?
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 19, 2016

    Call the HR department to find out.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 20, 2016

    Sadly, if you interviewed in April or early May, I think that they have made a decision and it just wasn't you. Just as sadly, many districts don't send out rejection letters or emails, leaving applicants in a state of limbo. It seems like poor manners to me, but I know it is a reality. Sorry. :(
     
  10. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Jun 20, 2016

    My reading of the original post is that these were jobs that had been applied for, not that the poster is following up after interviews. I concur with the upthread suggestion by waterfall that you follow up an application with an email to the principal that day or the next. Many sites choose their interviewees before the official closing date for a position.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 20, 2016

    The bottom line, sadly, is that if 6 weeks or more have passed, in all likelihood so has the opportunity. If you haven't been scheduled for an interview in that length of time, and the "application deadline" date has passed, the district, for whatever reason, is highly unlikely to consider you for an interview/job. I don't say that to be mean, but to be realistic. I've been down these roads, and the bottom line is that the hiring committee has a list of needs they believe will yield a successful candidate in their school or district. They may be right in their thinking, or they could be wrong, but there is no easy way for candidates to know that. Most schools want to get positions filled sooner rather than later, to allow for acclimation and new teacher meetings. So interview or no interview, I would not be hanging my hat on an application from sometime in April or May; I don't think an email will help, and education is a much smaller community than you think. If those emails annoy, that is what the person may talk about if your name comes up in conversation. I have worked in schools, heard some of the catty comments, watched the process play out. But if someone really wants to send another letter or an email, who am I to judge?
     
  12. LilMitsuko

    LilMitsuko Rookie

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    Jun 20, 2016

    Thank you for your reply. Yeah, I figured as much. I just didn't want that to become the case for the other schools I applied to. I thought that if I had sent a follow-up e-mail, perhaps that might strengthen my chances (since you're showing enthusiasm for the position, etc.). But it would seem like not sending one would be the better thing to do, so I'll just wait.

    Yeah, I was curious about sending a follow-up e-mail after applying for a job, not after an interview. You should follow-up after an interview anyway, though, right?

    *UPDATE*
    I got an interview though! :D My first interview is in two days! Any advice you guys can give would be super helpful (been reading through the other threads and stuff too).
     
  13. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jun 21, 2016

    I would try and highlight the things you already do well, while sort of minimizing your teaching ability in class. One of the things my P and fellow staff say about me now is how I work well with everyone on staff, and my ability to communicate with parents effectively. As a new teacher, I think it is hard to show how good you could be in the classroom, because you obviously haven't done much of it. Even now, I'd say I do an average job as a teacher. And if I were interviewing tomorrow, I'd even acknowledge that (I wouldn't use that word "average", but I'd acknowledge the fact that I have a lot to learn while highlighting my other abilities).

    I'd highlight the fact that everyone thinks I'm nice and great to work with, and I communicate well with parents, and that I was always the first one in to work every morning (i.e. commitment). Just come off as a person who is nice and who people would like to spend time with I guess...
     
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  14. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jun 22, 2016

    Congratulations on the interview! Be yourself, dress professionally, and use some key words but don't spout all of the educational jargon you know. Stress the well-being of your future students.
     
  15. LilMitsuko

    LilMitsuko Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2016

    *Update*

    I just finished the interview and I got a 2nd one! I have to create and demonstrate an English Language Arts 9th grade lesson. I'm super happy (but also slightly nervous, haha).

    Any advice or tips you can share? :D Thanks for your support, everyone!
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2016

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