To what extent is your contract renewal dependent on your fail rate?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mariecurie, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. mariecurie

    mariecurie Companion

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    In your opinion, what is an acceptable fail rate?
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Officially, my SOL rate has nothing to do with my continuing contract. Unofficially... there's a lot that a principal can do to make your life stink.

    As for an acceptable fail rate... way too many factors to list. If you're a special ed teacher working exclusively with kids with multiple disabilities and operating at a pre-primer level, then any failure rate better than 100% should be seen as a success.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Same.

    My admin likes to see failure rates under 15%. They love seeing single-digit failure rates.
     
  5. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    It's not. At all. And, although I could easily calculate it, I've never had to. There was one year where our admin came to us and said that too many of our Grade 9s were failing or in danger of and that we were to pull out all the stops to make sure they had every opportunity to achieve.
     
  6. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    No impact at all and it shouldn't.

    But, failing students is a hassle for Admin, especially if you are failing Seniors. Fail too many students and you will get put on Admin's hit list.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    All my kids are college prep; they had to beat out a LOT of other kids to even be accepted to the school. So it's not a question of them being unable to do the work.

    One year with a lot of failures could be a case of a weak class. But if any teacher continually had a high failure rate, then I could see the argument being made that he or she was unable to effectively explain the material in such a way that the kids could understand it.
     
  8. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Class grades- little to none. I can see it being an occasional issue if a teacher was failing everyone or passing everyone, but nothing structured. SOL pass rates are considered- student growth is 40% of our criteria and SOLs are part of that, but that's it.
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    OP, I am curious, why do you ask that?
     
  10. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    an "acceptable" (maybe there is a better word choice here) fail rate is one where the % of students who fail the class is exactly = to the % of students who were unwilling or unable to make a 70% during the grading period. as you might guess, I teach math.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 17, 2013

    I do too, but I don't agree.

    I realize that some classes are simply a bad mix or a group without adequate background.

    But there are some teachers whose standards are incredibly high, and some whose abilities are incredibly low. If you have a "good" group of kids-- kids who have never experienced real academic trouble before-- then the expectation is that the vast majority of them should be able to continue on without academic trouble. If they suddenly hit a teacher where the vast majority of them are unable to pass, then perhaps it's about the teacher.

    I once worked with a teacher whose credentials were sterling. It was his first year, but he had gone to TC at Columbia, (and was willing to make sure that we all knew it), so of COURSE that meant that he was the best teacher in the building. Except, of course, that he couldn't teach. I realized the extent of the issue when the brightest kid in the grade-- a kid who had gotten a 100% on my Comprehensive the year before and eventually became valedictorian of a class of 500+ kids-- failed Jim's first trimester exam. In fact, Jim was arrogant enough to announce to the class that NO ONE had passed the exam-- the same exam taken and passed by all the kids in that level who had other teachers.

    Let's just say that he didn't work in my school for long. Our job as teachers is to be able to explain the material in such a way that the overwhelming majority of our kids can understand and internalize it.

    Sometimes it's not about the kids or their work ethic or their preparation. Sometimes it's about the teacher.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Oh, Alice, I've seen that before too. I've also seen the burned out teacher that was fabulous who eventually let the little things get to her. When that happened, it became about how awful the students were and that is the reason for the failures. It wasn't that the teacher stopped coming to class on time, reading power points every two weeks, and calling the kids names all the time. Assignments degenerated to word searches and a self-taught class. Grading went undone for weeks at a time, but it was the students that were the problem.

    It is sad when this happens. It is good that your school recognizes ineffectiveness right away. It is sad when it is allowed to go on for several years before the administration gets enough information to give the teacher a choice to resign or be terminated.

    None of what I said means that all teachers are like this, but to ignore the fact that there are ineffective teachers out there whether they start that way or develop into ineffective teachers, we can't always blame the students for lack of learning even though it is a great and handy tool to eliminate responsibility of the teacher.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Exactly. And sometimes, though not always, an excessively high failure rate is a symptom of bad teaching.
     
  14. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    alice, I agree with you 100%. My post was predicated on the assumption that the teacher IS, in fact, teaching.
     
  15. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    But how many of the ineffective ones will say they aren't teaching? Most will claim they are teaching and doing a darn good job of it. It is the students that are the problem or the administrator or...
     
  16. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Right. "Jim" in the example I used honestly thought that he was the most magnificent teacher in the building, and that the problem was the kids... all 180 of them.
     

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