To homework or not to homework?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by horned_Frog89, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. horned_Frog89

    horned_Frog89 Companion

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    I will be starting my 3rd year of teaching 6th grade general ed. math. I've been at the same school for all 3 years.

    I teach at a school where parent involvement is minimal. Most parents don't answer the phone, or if we do make contact they say they'll help, but nothing happens.

    My first two years of homework hasn't gone well. By January, half the kids aren't doing homework (not just my class - ALL classes). We call parents, but nothing happens. I've tried "Oops I forgot my homework sheets", but so many kids weren't doing their homework that I was having to make copies every day.

    I've tried having kids glue their homework into their INB, but kids STILL lose the homework and don't do it.
    I've done weekly packets, but they still don't do it, or they lose it.

    My homework has been for a completion grade since the beginning, but that doesn't help. I'm thinking about taking homework off the table this year because it's not getting done. There have been days when only 4 or 5 students complete the work. My homework is even just for completion, but half the time I walk around, it's obvious students have rushed though it. This past year, I had two students who did NOTHING in any class, all year.

    We don't have a recess to take away or a "Homework hall".

    Would you continue to do homework in this school environment?
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I have the same problem. This year I am lengthening the math lesson in class to allow students to complete the problems that would have been assigned for homework.
     
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  4. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    I can't stand homework. I assign about 10 minutes a week simply because I'm required to assign it. If there is no school or district policy that you have to assign homework, I would drop it.
     
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  5. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    You need to ask yourself what the goal of assigning homework is, and if you are meeting that goal. It doesn't sound like you are, so I would stop assigning homework and try something else. I rarely assigned homework when I taught grade 6. The few times I did, it was assigned to students who didn't use their class time well, which resulted in unfinished work. I worked with supportive parents who made sure the work got done. But there was no routine homework.
     
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  6. horned_Frog89

    horned_Frog89 Companion

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    Thanks, guys. I am really thinking about scraping it. Not only would it save me a whole lot of time at the copier, but MissScrimmage is right, if less than half the kids are completing it, then there's no point. Ideally, it'd be a way for kids to reflect, decide if they need tutoring or help, but it's not working out like that.

    Overall, the kids at our school don't get a lot of homework. Science and Social Studies does NOT assign homework daily. ELAR will have some a few times a week, but math has usually been the most consistent. In the end, they hardly do any of it.
     
  7. rpan

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    Homework is up to teacher discretion in my school. I don't give any homework, perhaps 3 times a year if that. I don't believe in homework for homework sake; that does not accomplish anything except overburden students for no good reason. I prefer that students do in class work where I can monitor them, they can ask questions and it gets done. It's also a good way for me to see who needs help, who hasn't really understood, who has understood etc. I make sure my in class work can be finished in the one lesson and at the end of the lesson, I get students to swap papers and peer assess, with me giving the answers and student using their judgement to judge if an answer is correct. This works well for me.
     
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  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I would say yes you should have some homework for 6th grade math--since the practice can help.

    Students will always try to get out of homework. Some kind of consequence for no homework--even if that means a "0" in the gradebook is needed. No consequence will get all kids to comply with homework. I think you can get 80% of students to do homework--90% would be exceptional--but even if you get only 50% that is better than no homework where 0% are getting the benefit from it. Keep homework, short, simple, and practice. If you want to make it interesting that is a bonus--but don't kill yourself over that.

    My two cents.
     
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  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I give no regular daily homework to my Grade 7s. I ask them to read and they will occasionally have to complete unfinished work or work on long-term assignments, but that's it. I don't believe in homework just for the sake of it.
     
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  10. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Last year I mainly need the reading logs because our school was logging reading minutes. If that drops this year, I am dropping the reading log.
     
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  11. MathGuy82

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    I don't like assigning homework anymore. I teach 9-12 math. That way, they can ask for help from me and other students. We also don't allow cell phone use either. Unfortunately with certain electronic devices, students can take a picture of the problem and it will show all steps on how to solve it. With the exception of certain word problems, there are apps you can download that do it all and all the work. I found that was starting to happen when I assigned outside projects. Now everything is done in class without any electronic use, with the exception of a non-graphing calculator. That way I know students are working and there is no way it can be cheated or forgotten. Was tired of so many excuses too.
     
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  12. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    I give one page (front and back) of math practice each week most weeks. It's given on Monday and due on Friday. Usually somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 problems, sometimes up to 40 if they're especially short/ quick. I teach MS math and use it as spiral review/ additional practice of skills I know they have down pretty well. Sometimes I include reference material right on the page if I think they will need it.

    Homework is required at my school but only counts for 10% of their grade. I would say anywhere from 25-75% of my class completes it each week (varies a lot), normally probably about a third to half the class. I just grade it for completion. Not doing it the whole quarter can bring a kid's grade down a little but it doesn't have a gigantic impact so I don't stress about it too much.

    I often use CommonCoreSheets.com to generate the pages.
     
  13. horned_Frog89

    horned_Frog89 Companion

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    In my district, homework isn't mandatory. We just have major and minor grades.

    However, the split is 60-40, so a kid that misses two or three homework assignments will lose 10+ points on his grade. This is another reason I'm considering abandoning homework.

    How would this grading system affect your decision about homework?
     
  14. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    So homework is the only way to teach responsibility? Why homework specifically to teach this skill and why should I as a teacher spend previous prep time making homework? Aren't there all sorts of other responsibilities, even countless ones, out there in life?
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
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  15. otterpop

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    I get I'm maybe a minority here, but I feel like getting rid of homework because it's not turned in is lowering the bar because these kids are not taking responsibility for their learning. I understand the arguments against homework, but I also feel like we (our country/culture) coddle students and let them get away with being lazy. If it were me, I'd try two things: making sure there's a consequence for not turning it in (0 on assignment), and finding an incentive or motivator for students who do turn in their homework.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
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  16. Backroads

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    I see your point and agree with it and I would in particular give the same advice of consequence/incentive if the OP were truly up for keeping homework.

    But if the OP is just keeping homework around just because and has no other philosophical ball in the court, would it be so awful to just drop it? If finding a way to keep homework going is an end to itself, well, it seems all educational focus has gone to a battle over homework.

    Is the homework engaging? Is it reinforcing concepts/providing opportunity to extend knowledge? Does the OP feel particularly strong about teaching the practice of that responsibility? If not, I personally would just bow out of the homework.

    Plus (and in realization this probably isn't what you're saying but merely using the phrase as a jumping-off point), I don't think a slack/lack of homework is the sole reason or contributor of student laziness.
     
  17. horned_Frog89

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    I'm reading Love and Logic, and I'm contemplating doing something I read in the book.

    I thinking of giving weekly homework 10 problems or so- and giving students opportunity to chose which problems they do out of, say 5 or 6.

    Maybe, just maybe, if they have some choice in the matter, there will be more buy-in.

    I do agree, that at this point (and at least at this particular school), that there is minimal academic benefit. I think it tapers mid year because of a school culture issue. We are about to get our 3rd principal in as many years. So many of our leaders talk the talk, but don't walk the walk. Our New Principal sounds like he knows what he's doing. I'm sure he'll make some decisions that will affect my classroom policies.
     
  18. WarriorPrncss

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    My first year teaching we had a LONG school day, 8-4, so the "homework" was assigned in class after the lesson. Students had plenty of time to complete it and if they didn't it's because they were horsing around at which point they had to take it home to finish.

    This year we barely had time to teach our lessons. I'd send home weekly homework packets, usually 4 pages (a page a day) with math facts and general concepts students needed reinforced outside of school. I gave jolly ranchers for returning it. (in 3rd grade they live for the jolly rancher, maybe not to much in 6th).

    Anyhow, I agree with the other here--- why are you assigning homework, what is your goal with it? If it's not necessary, send it. If it is, decide on some consequences to hit them where it hurts--- my students will do ANYTHING for even 5 minutes on SumDog or another technology app. And they know if homework isn't done and turned in on friday they miss "Fun Friday Free app time" the last 15 minutes of class, and they spend that time doing homework.
     
  19. Backroads

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    That does not answer the question of why homework is necessary. Lots of jobs don't have homework.

    That's fine and fair. You were assigned this, do it.

    But does that mean a teacher must assign homework in the first place?
     
  20. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  21. horned_Frog89

    horned_Frog89 Companion

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    Yikes. I appreciate your response, but the attitude you have will get you eaten alive at my school. My kids may only be 6th grade, but they have experienced more about the horrible idea of "status" of this world than they should have to (and not the good kind). My kids may NOT be perfect, but they don't need anyone else in this world telling them that they're not worthy or aren't as important as me or anyone else, regardless of their age or education.
     
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  22. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    My feelings about homework have changed dramatically over the past 10 years or so. Seeing my own children, who picked up concepts very quickly, work on homework for upwards of 3 hours on school nights and 10 hours on the weekends, convinced me that something was wrong. Historically, in my own classes, the students who understand the concepts, and don't need the practice, do the homework and those who are struggling don't. I never reflect homework in grades, and choose not to take time away from teaching to check and chase down missing homework. I can find lots of ways, within the school day, to evaluate student mastery of concepts

    Not everyone agrees with me, and I'm fine with that. It works for me.
     
  23. Leaborb192

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    ,
     
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  24. GPC0321

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    I don't think teachers should be forced or pressured into giving homework if they themselves don't find it necessary or beneficial for their class.
    However, if teachers DO assign homework and feel it is necessary and beneficial, then students should be held accountable if they do not complete it -- 0 on a homework grade.
    And the kids simply deciding they don't want to do homework is not a reason for a teacher to give up and stop assigning it.
    I agree with Teacherhere. We're creating the future adults of this world. Doing something you don't want to do and that takes time away from doing the things you want to do is just part of being an adult. Kids have to learn this skill at some point. It doesn't have to be homework that teaches the skill, but removing homework simply because the kids don't do it is not doing them any favors.
    I don't want to pay my bills, but I don't think they're going to just stop billing me because I never pay it anyway, and let me keep my water, electricity, internet, cable, phone, credit card, vehicle, house, etc.
    And there are a LOT of young adults who get into financial and legal trouble because they were allowed to set the rules while growing up, and never learned to operate by anyone else's. They have a rude awakening when they get into the real world for which no one has prepared them.

    Sorry for the rant. I couldn't care less about homework, but I think it should be the TEACHER'S decision whether or not to assign it, not the students'.
     
  25. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    . We're creating the future adults of this world. Doing something you don't want to do and that takes time away from doing the things you want to do is just part of being an adult. Kids have to learn this skill at some point. It doesn't have to be homework that teaches the skill, but removing homework simply because the kids don't do it is not doing them any favors.
    I don't want to pay my bills, but I don't think they're going to just stop billing me because I never pay it anyway, and let me keep my water, electricity, internet, cable, phone, credit card, vehicle, house, etc.
    And there are a LOT of young adults who get into financial and legal trouble because they were allowed to set the rules while growing up, and never learned to operate by anyone else's. They have a rude awakening when they get into the real world for which no one has prepared them.


    While I agree with the above, I think this responsibility falls on parents, not teachers. I've had far too many students who lived in their parent's car, had no electricity at home, or were raising their sibling because their parents were working three jobs to support them to say that homework helps create responsible adults. If the only reason a teacher is assigning homework is to promote responsibility, I challenge them to think of other ways to do that. For example, make it their responsibility to complete their work in class or complete classroom jobs.

    The homework debate has been around for decades and is one I don't think educators will ever agree on. To each their own.
     
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  26. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Somewhere out there is a child who lives in horrid conditions and is grateful for her nightly homework because it is a way for her to escape the harsh reality of her situation, and she knows it is the ticket to a brighter future.

    There are children in some countries who risk their lives just to get an education because they recognize how important it is to improve their lives.

    I'm not trying to be heartless, but when we, as educators, see education as a chore that we don't want to burden children with, we really are selling them short. We're creating the kind of people who will live in poverty and have children in poverty and continue the cycle on and on and on.

    Mind you, I'm not defending giving homework for homework's sake alone. That's silly. But if the homework is beneficial to the child's understanding of the material, or is vital for the next day's lesson, then it should be assigned, and every child should be expected to complete it.
     
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  27. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    A couple thoughts - meant to add on to yours and to the whole of the thread, not to knock back:
    -- Is our academic system necessarily worse because the level of a student exiting high school isn't as high as someone in a different country? Can we just consider those particular scores? I have some students in my class who have skills higher than others, but does that mean they're more successful? When I look holistically (academics in one area vs. common sense vs. life skills), I'm not so sure in that smaller sense.

    -- This strays further from your comment, but I sincerely believe that mindset and study/life skills are extremely important, as we can teach a child so much in a given day, but it's whether they extend that learning, choose to do some self-study, are curious, etc... that can make a tremendous difference. Does homework instill that? Does homework instill the opposite? I look at the reading numbers from this year, and in stripping away all requirements, and instead focusing on teaching the study/life skills and mindset, that they actually all read more...even the ones who would be ones to not turn in HW often.
     
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  28. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    I agree.
    I think the problem is that somewhere along a child's development, we've got to move away from seeing them as perpetual "children" and start pushing them into young adulthood and then adulthood. It just doesn't seem to be happening. So, these children progress through elementary, middle, and even high school, still being treated like young children and having very little pressure put on them to grow up.

    Somehow it has become the children's world and the rest of us are just living in it. Everyone caters to their whims and wants, and no one wants to upset them or cause them a moment of mental or emotional stress. Never mind the fact that when we dump them out into the real world as adult children, they'll have more mental and emotional stress than they can handle because no one taught them to handle it while growing up.

    Thankfully, good parents still raise children and expect them to grow up and be responsible and accountable. But teachers need to be just as diligent in this, IMO. Good teachers, like good parents, should realize that their job isn't to coddle and protect the children from the realities of the adult world, but rather to prepare them to be successful in the adult world. That is our job.
     
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  29. a2z

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    That world is so different. There is no common world that students are released into. We could pick our favorite example to use but the reality is that life varies so much.
     
  30. a2z

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    We don't tend to teach students responsibility and other character traits. We tell yhem what they should do snd punish when they don't. It is rare to help them problem solve the issues. Even if it isn't a harsh punishment the system tends to try to teach by bad consequences and usually not natural consequences.
     
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  31. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    But isn't that how life works? If you don't pay your bills, you get your utilities turned off, you get your vehicle taken away, you lose your home, etc. If you break the law you get ticketed, fined, or imprisoned. If you slack off at work or fail to do your job adequately you get fired. If you spend more money than you earn, you wind up in horrible debt and with terrible credit. If you party and blow off class in college you fail and face being put on academic probation or being kicked out.

    So what's wrong with, if you don't do the assigned homework in this class your grade will suffer? That's a "natural consequence" of choosing not to do homework, right? And the student learns that it's his/her responsibility. Want a better grade? Do the homework. Simple. If their desire to NOT do the homework is stronger than their desire for a better grade, then they'll suffer the consequences. Just like if as adults they choose to spend their paycheck on frivolous things instead of paying their bills, they'll suffer the consequences.

    They need to be given ownership of their choices, and ownership of the consequences. Homework isn't the ONLY way to teach that, but if a teacher finds homework beneficial in his/her class, it certainly is one way of building personal responsibility in these future adults.
     
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  32. Backroads

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    We speak highly of natural consequences, but so many fear them and shield others from them.
     
  33. a2z

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    If you fsil to pay your light bill it is never turned off immediately. You are given opportunity to rectify the problrm. Depending on how rarely it happens sometimes the penalty is waved. Tickets? Many times people get warnings.

    Docked pay for not handing something in on time? Depends on the job. Fired for being late? Again it depends on the job. Depends on how hard it is to get help.
    What about the student who sits for hours working on the homework because it is too hard for them and the reason for it is just to build responsibility. Sucks for that child who doesn't need the lesson in responsibility but really needs academic help.

    I guess it is ok to go that route as long as the teacher who chooses that doesn't complain when the admin makes everyone clock in and out or jump other hoops because miss jones can't get her act together. Isn't part of administration teaching employees the right way to do their jobs?
     
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  34. a2z

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    You may claim it is flawed logic but if we are supposed to teach about how the real world works which was the assertion the reality is that the real world isn't black and white.

    Are you asserting yhat s child who already understands responsibility should continue to jump through hoops just because they are a child?
     
  35. a2z

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    The problem is why someone's grade will suffer. Joey gets zeros on all of his homework because he doesn't do it. Homework counts for 15% of the grade Joey gets a solid B in math even though he got 100% on every test and quiz. That is not a natural consequence. Now if homework counted for nothing and you could show that Joey's poor grade on tests and quizzes stemmed from failure to do homework, then that would be a natural consequence.
     
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  36. skeptic

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    Yes and here is why:

    What I do works. First let me explain what I do. (My subject is middle school science.)

    (Time allowance) Most of my homework is "unfinished classwork." Generally if I assign a homework, I give several days to complete it so that my very busy students with extracurricular activities or those with a not-the-best-homelife can complete it. Also I am available before school in the mornings if a student needs to come in and work on it.

    (Purposeful) Yes, and it must serve a purpose such as practicing skills we learned or revisiting concepts so that a student understands the concepts well enough to apply them as their assessment is more about the application and critical thinking skills. (If you don't have a solid, strong foundation, you can't do the criticial thinking.)

    (System) I offer a reward system for those that do the work and consequences that are clearly spelled out for those that don't complete it. (Just like with paying your bills, I do have a clear late policy with an incentive built in.) I rarely ever reward with candy, so if I do, it is a BIG deal. I use the punch card system. Reward - tickets. This way students (and parents) know how many times their child wasn't prepared for class. And also those that have their work have better odds at winning. I do the drawing twice a year. One nice prize and a number of small prizes.

    (Opportunity) Many times I also incorporate the flipped classroom idea into my way of doing things. If you did your homework and show competency, then you get to do this activity (related to what we are doing) while I work with those that didn't complete the work. 1) no one is punished in this instance and 2) teaches the students that they have choice. (ie. Flipped classroom lesson over the scientific method. Students that complete it get to do the chewing gum sc. method lab while those that didn't do the flipped lesson do the flipped lesson in class with me. Carrot --- A big deal when normally there is no gum chewing in the science lab!) Also to me this seems to work well with differentiation. And it is not something I do everyday. Middle schoolers like variety. (And I make sure not to give any assignments over the holiday or weekends.)

    My daughter teaches middle school math and uses the flipped lesson method. She does half the problems in the video lesson (harder ones) and then her students work the others on their own. This serves as an incentive and It works well for her. These can be started in class so a student that is really "on the ball" can get mostly finished by end of class. (I guess this all depends on how much time you have in a class period.)
     
  37. a2z

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    I agree children should follow instructions, but I question the validity if forcing a child into that situation for the convienience of the teacher. Just because authority can force compliance under the fear of punidhment or blind compliance because of their position, it doesn't make it right for that authority to abuse that power.

    Forcing a child who you know already has the skills you are trying to teach to continually have to jump through the hoop just because is an abuse of power in my mind. If the child ever finds out the only purpose for the homework is to teach compliance the student will no longer respect the teacher ot the homework, especially if they figure out they are having to do it because someone else lacks the skill.
     
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  38. jadorelafrance

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    Jun 17, 2017

    I HATE homework. However, it's a requirement to include it as a grade at my school, and I find it a waste of my time to grade, as I have more important things to grade and do. I do the minimum amount (10%) and tell students I will occasionally collect for accuracy or check for completion (I don't like to check every assignment for completion because I feel like it inflates their grade). But I only do this 3 times a marking period, because it does pile up with all my classes. My philosophy is that students should just do homework for the practice. It shouldn't be graded, because it is practice, so I try and only collect things that aren't just practice activities that require the same answer (super boring and monotonous to grade), but readings or personal essays or presentations that show me they understand a cultural element or how to use the language in context.
    I teach a population of students who will do their homework if assigned, and if they don't, it's because they were too busy with extracurricular or family things and in that case they're just not prepared for class. And that's on them. I assign homework almost nightly to practice what we did in class (or occasionally introduce a concept that I think they'll understand quickly and we can then move on to application activities in class). I never check those but we always go over in class (and I will pick random students to answer). I find that students who do their homework in general do well overall in my class and can come to class prepared with questions and I can see where students are confused and need extra help/practice with. I do have students who never do homework but still get a B (or a C), which is fine if they're happy with that grade.

    I will say that when I do collect homework to grade, it takes me forever to get to it because I dread it. I wish I could just include it all into a preparation/participation grade and call it a day, but I have to have a separate category. I will have to figure out a better system next year because I just can't deal with it anymore lol. Any suggestions?
     
  39. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    I do think that kids need to be held accountable for being prepared for class everyday. They're not all mature enough to handle being completely unaccounted for. I found this year I did not include any sort of participation/preparation grade and it annoyed me to what extent kids did not come with a pencil, their binder/notebook, or textbook, to the point that it really affected my lessons. If half the class or more doesn't bring their book, well it makes it really hard to do anything in the book independently. I don't like the idea of including participation/preparation/homework as a grade, because it doesn't show mastery of the material, but it helps a class run smoothly and motivates kids to be prepared and to go back to their locker if they forget something instead of eh who cares the teacher can't/won't do anything about it (same with speaking the language, what motivation do they have if there is no grade attached to it. They don't all take a language to speak it believe it or not). This is also common in college (participation that is). When I was initially hired, my boss told me not to include participation as a grade because kids should just naturally come prepared, participate, and speak the target language. Uhhhhh 5 years later I'm ready to start counting it.
     
  40. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jun 17, 2017

    Ha! This is actually happening at our school right now thanks to a handful of teachers who have been taking advantage of our principal's generosity. Doesn't bother me one bit because I don't take advantage and I do what I'm supposed to do. The offending teachers are in a tizzy though because they can no longer flake out and it's cramping their style. Oh well!

    But you're right. Our principal even tells us, we (teachers) actually teach our students how to treat us. Not necessarily intentionally though. If we allow them to turn in sloppy work, sleep in class, talk back to us, ignore our requirements for our class (including homework), be disruptive and disrespectful, etc. then we are basically teaching them that this is okay and allowed behavior. On the flip side, if we set expectations and consequences and consistently enforce these, including the requirements for a good grade in the class (homework if applicable), the students will meet those expectations.

    Unfortunately our principal taught some of his staff that it was okay to take advantage of him and disrespect him, and now he's in the process of correcting that issue.

    My problem is, I never had to be taught by any principal I've had how to do my job. I learned when I was a child to always respect my superiors, work hard for anything I get, and be responsible for my own successes and mistakes. My parents AND teachers taught me that since day one.
     
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  41. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I've always respected the position even if I didn't particularly respect the person in the position. So, while I may have had to do things because others weren't complying and it was forced on all, I lost respect for the teacher (or whatever position) that they didn't deal with those who were causing the problems but dealt with everyone.

    Now, I was first responding to the comment that the homework was given to promote responsibility, not to improve academics. That is why I feel that it is just not right to punish the whole for the actions of a few. I also believe there are children who completely understand responsibility and authority (even though they may make a mistake now and then due to other skill lag). For those to have to go through the homework game to learn a skill they already know is, in my opinion, not fair to them or their families. It is similar to the signing of the reading log for the kid that always reads. It is something they are forced to do to prove they are doing what they have always been doing. Then if they forget to sign the log take points away for "not reading".

    I'm happy to hear you aren't hypocritical in your views. If you are happy having to jump through a new hoop because of your lazy co-workers, that's great for you. I do wonder how much inconvenience you would tolerate before you started to resent that your co-workers made your life harder because they didn't do what they were supposed to and you were now forced to take extra steps to prove what you were doing all along.
     
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  42. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    That is fantastic you didn't have to be taught, but there is a very vocal contingent of teachers who get lower evaluations than they like who blame the administrators for not giving them more training and teaching so they can do their jobs better. They see it as the jobs of the administrator to teach them how to be better teachers. Seems some want to be taught.
     
  43. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    What's the harm in requiring a child to practice an academic skill at home, even one he or she has mastered, in order to earn an easy grade in a class?
     
  44. jadorelafrance

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    If the kid has mastered the content, and the class is an easy A, they're in the wrong class/level. Homework should be practice and should be somewhat challenging
     
  45. GPC0321

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    I'm not inconvenienced at all, nor am I forced to jump through more hoops, because I never took advantage of the principal's generosity to begin with. I play by the rules, and I'm actually glad to see others being forced to do so as well.
    I'd be the kid in the class who LIKES homework because I always do it and always get credit for it, and I'd be mad if the teacher took it away just because half of my classmates are blowing it off. I'd be wondering why the teacher is letting the kids run the show.
     
  46. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    It takes time away from the child and the family for no other reason but to satisfy a preference in procedure for a teacher. The child could be doing something else they enjoy which may come with it many opportunities for various sorts of learning. Families may have other things to do rather than wait for a child to complete work they already know how to do. There is harm in it.
     
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  47. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Maybe not in your particular situation, but I know many things administrators have chosen to do because some weren't complying and all need to suffer. For example, clocking in and out in the office during particular times so that even if you go in earlier than the office opens you must stop what you are doing and walk to the office to physically clock in. Producing paperwork to prove you are doing what you have been doing even though it doesn't require paperwork. Now you have to spend your time on clerical work that is unnecessary for you. I could go on and on about ways that a life can be impacted by not just dealing with those that need more guidance.
     
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