to advance student to K or not

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by maggie123, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. maggie123

    maggie123 Rookie

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    Feb 8, 2011

    I know it's still early but I have a student that is not really progressing with her skills. She just doesn't remember anything. Even things she knew 2 weeks ago, she has no clue. My first thought is to have her repeat pre-k instead of going to Kindergarten, however, if it is a learning disability she has then holding her back will probably not make a difference. I'm not sure which way to lean.

    Has anyone had any experience with this type of student? They aren't old enough to qualify for testing at this age. I have to submit my initial recommendations. (final ones at the end of the year)
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 8, 2011

    Many learning disabilities could have been prevented if students received more intensive reading instruction in their early years. I think that if you have the option of retention at this age, I would seriously look at the data and consider this option.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 8, 2011

    I've never heard of a kid who is 'of age' being denied kindergarten.
     
  5. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Feb 9, 2011

    I have never heard of a the right age being held out, due to the issues that would cause "retention" in a higher grade. To be honest I have seen many children in higher grades in my feeder school that are not retained, including my own children.

    So, my point is. Speak to the parents and let them know where you feel she is. But in the end I don't see how you would have the authority to NOT send a child.

    As far as the testing, the district has to do it - in US. The parents again would be the people to refer, so it all goes back to alert them of your perceived issues and let them run with the ball. Inside the classroom you just keep looking for inventive ways to help.
     
  6. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Feb 9, 2011

    I guess I am a little confused. Are you in the United States? According to federal law, any child 3 and over has the right to be tested for free by the local school district. All the parents have to do is contact the school district and write a letter to the appropriate person stating their concerns and asking for testing. You could also have a conference with parents, state your observations and concerns, and ask that they have the child developmentally assessed. They can go to their pediatrician and be assessed by their insurance. Also, I bet their are other resources in your area such as the local college. Whether she ends up receiving services is another matter, but testing shouldn't be an issue.

    Also, I don't know any district where the pre-k teacher decides to send the child or not. It is up to the parents to decide. No child is denied kindergarten because they aren't "ready." The school needs to be "ready" to accept children no matter their developmental level or needs. There will be plenty of children there who aren't "ready" - God bless kindergarten teachers! I'm not saying the child should go, but if she has a late birthday and just needs to mature an extra year may be great. If it is a learning disability, then more specialized help would help - the earlier the better.

    I had an adopted child for a couple of years in my classes who had been born drug addicted who seemed fine at first, but as she grew we realized she had serious short-term memory issues. She could look at an A, we could say what it was a hundred times, she would smile, repeat it, seem to know it and 5 minutes later act like she had never seen one before in her life. It was weird to see. She needed intensive therapy to kind of rewire her brain to build connections that were missing.
     
  7. CandorWit

    CandorWit Rookie

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    Feb 9, 2011

    My son goes to an intervention preschool where they work with students who have development and/or special needs to help prepare them for kindergarten. The school district provides all necessary testing and evaluations. I have never heard of a child being held back from kindergarten either.
     
  8. maggie123

    maggie123 Rookie

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    Feb 9, 2011

    The school district doesn't test until 1st grade. Any testing that gets done has to be done privately, but the parents don't really seem concerned enough to do anything.
     

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