Tips for teaching cutting skills?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Backroads, May 22, 2018.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 22, 2018

    I have an end-of-year 2nd grader who severely struggles with cutting things out. This is passable for cutting out spelling words, but becomes another matter when she wants to make a nice craft or such. There has been some discussion of OT for her next year, but any tips for this last week of school of cutting boot camp?
     
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  3. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    May 22, 2018

    Maybe a practice packet made of these types of sheets? You can follow the notes at the beginning to make sure she's holding her scissors correctly and whatnot, and then just have her do a ton of practice.
     
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  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    May 22, 2018

    This is a great resource. Thanks for sharing.
     
  5. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 22, 2018

    I think this will be good. I'm being crafty this last week, and I can tell she's getting frustrated and noticing other kids are much better at cutting things out.
     
  6. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    As an upper elementary teacher here, thank you for your efforts. Many of our students still need this very basic practice, but by the time I get them any basic review for how to hold a pencil, form letters, or use scissors is met with a lot of resistance ("this stuff's for babies," "do I have to," and etc.). I think students' fine motor skills have gotten worse each year I've taught.
     
  7. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Do you have any other kids who still struggle with cutting neatly? It might help if there's more than just one student practicing cutting paper so she doesn't feel singled out or more insecure about being bad at it.
     
  8. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Sadly, no, it's just the one. :(
     
  9. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    May 22, 2018

    Practice, practice, practice. The more she does it, the better she'll get at it. Is it possible to give her a pair of scissors to take home and use over the summer?
     
  10. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    May 28, 2018

    Ironically, this is a skill I find very soothing and frustrating at the same time. Kids like to cut things to shreds, to the point where you can't even recognize what they were cutting out. That's why I always make extra dittos, forms, etc. I can't cut a straight line even if I draw one with a ruler! :confused: I have a bad habit of stacking sheets together and cutting them, and some always end up wider at the end, as the other sheets slip out. Seriously believe I missed the trick to cutting because I jumped a grade. :cool:

    On the other hand, I find cutting out letters and laminating is a very good stress reliever. You take time turning and making clean cuts. Whenever there is a boring meeting, I sneak in some laminating I need cutting, and that makes the time go quicker. I get ugly stares and lectures later, sometimes clear reminders in the meeting that I shouldn't be doing that now. Well, I am trying to stay awake and stay productive.

    That being said, get your student to cut out anything and everything you need! Start with form. Are you making sure she does the handshake, and puts her thumb in the hole, and the rest of her fingers grip the larger oval? Next, can you hold the paper on both ends for her and chant, "Open and close, open and close." Some kids move through paper like a hurricane. Others move so slow the scissors jam and turn sideways in the paper. Have you seen those scissors with a loop? They are easier to handle, because you just squeeze them!

    I have preschoolers who hold their scissors in some weird positions, but still get the job done. If you only focus on assignments, and not notice the form, it can become stressful. Watch her grip, tell her to relax, and then let her cut everything you can get your hands on! Recycle scraps and have her (and the rest of the class) to make mosaic or stained glass picture!

    I agree that practice makes perfect. Let her cut out everything for you. If you tell her that she is helping you, and she'll get to see her work hanging on the board, well - how's that for motivation??
     
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  11. Katie W

    Katie W New Member

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    have you checked out Kids Love WHAT yet? there are a ton of diy and crafts that your 2nd grader could try out. a lot of them involve cutting and other hand coordination. i know for myself, my daughters love doing these kinds of crafts and it has built up their coordination levels quite a bit!
     
  12. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    I used to watch a crafting show (anyone else remember Carol Duvall?) and the tip I learned was to turn the paper, not the scissors. Don’t know if that’s applicable for your situation, but it helped me!
     

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