Tips for keeping kids engaged during videos?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by newteech, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. newteech

    newteech Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2010

    My school has purchased a Discovery streaming account for the new school year. I would like to show a few more videos than I have in the past.

    How do you keep your kids engaged when playing videos? I don't want to require they take notes or anything, but I do want them actively listening.

    Thanks for the ideas!
     
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  3. Blkjacq

    Blkjacq Companion

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    Aug 27, 2010

    sometimes I have them answer a few short questions that I've handed out.

    sometimes I have them write 3-5 facts as they watch. We call them "ah-has" or things they were surprised to hear

    sometimes I jot down some questions while they're watching and ask them when the video is done. Toss some candy to those who answer and suddenly the hands go up and they pay really good attention the next time I show a video
     
  4. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    Aug 27, 2010

    I use Laura Candler's form...has really worked well for me. :) I usually modify by asking them to list 5 interesting things that they learned from the video. All most all of my students write way more than 5.
    http://www.lauracandler.com/filecabinet/science/videorep.pdf

    Absolutely love United Streaming!! :)
     
  5. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Aug 28, 2010

    Keep them short and relevant. If they have time to start goofing off, you probably don't need to show the whole video.

    I hate video notes. Kids spend more time trying to get the answers than they do getting anything out of watching the video. I usually just did guided discussion or a written reflection after, or I would have groups spend 15 minutes or so reflecting and making a summary poster.
     
  6. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Aug 28, 2010

    If the kids won't watch I stop the video and show it again during recess! Or just keep back those that didn't watch and make them watch it again at recess. They soon learn.
     
  7. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    I think students need to be engaged to keep the learning process going. So I would stop the video frequently and ask questions to keep them from "phasing out."

    Also, I would have pre-made questions and discuss the questions before the video so your students have a purpose when watching the video.

    If they don't know what to look out for, they'll phase out.
     
  8. Lynn K.

    Lynn K. Habitué

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    Aug 28, 2010

    I agree with Unbeknownst. Give them a purpose, something to watch for. I love the little gasps of delight when they find it!

    I also sometimes break the video into parts and stop it and tell them what to look for next as needed.
     
  9. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Aug 28, 2010

    If they aren't interested in the video then why are you showing it?

    I really don't care for united/discovery streaming as so many of the videos are just plain awful. Anything media made before 2005 just looks ancient to our kids and some of the stuff on the streaming sites is from loooong before that.

    That said, if you for whatever reason there is something worth showing, keep it very short and, as Lynn said, tell them what to be listening for.

    Lastly, what is your hesitation with asking them to take notes during the video?
     
  10. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Aug 28, 2010

    The only thing with having them write down a certain number of notes is, they'll just jot down any fact that they hear in the first 5 minutes...

    I think you might want to tell them we are having a short quiz at the conclusion of a video. Not anything major; but just to get the point across that they need to follow pretty intently because the quiz will be on the material in the video. When particularly parts that are on the video, maybe you can say, "hmmm... interesting" or something that would cue the students into paying particular attention (as it would be asked on the quiz). Also, stopping to make connections is a good idea.
     
  11. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Aug 28, 2010

    Why are they watching? If they don't have anything that they'll need to DO with what they learn in the video, then there is really no reason to show it.

    I always tell students WHY we are watching the video, and what they'll need to know afterward. Sometimes I give them some kind of tracking sheet to go along with it.
     
  12. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Aug 28, 2010

    Unless they are super good and very relevant to the learning objectives of my class (and usually very short), I don't show videos. My "co-teacher" will show long videos so she can get other things done and it usually just leads to kids bugging each other, not paying attention, etc. Personally, I think kids pay way to much time in front of video screens so I avoid them.
     
  13. heavens54

    heavens54 Connoisseur

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    Aug 29, 2010

    The students know BEFORE watching the film of choice that they will have to complete some sort of product at the end of it; a thinking map, a graphic organizer, or a summary. I want to know what they got out of it, that they were focused and if they made connections. If nothing else, a drawing from the film will do, or a poster. There are many creative products they could make and take away from the assignment.
     
  14. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Aug 29, 2010

    Sometimes I will ask my students for "3 Facts and a Question" after we finish the video. They enjoy listening for neat information to write down.

    But I agree, keep them short and focused. Break it into sections, and then stop and discuss in between each one.
     
  15. luvsocr33

    luvsocr33 Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2010

    Our school also uses United Streaming from Discovery. Many of the movies/clips have a five question on screen quiz that is read at the end of the videos. I let the students know ahead of time there will be seom questions at the end. I do not have them take notes. Then I pause the video at the end before the quiz and have them answer the questions as they are read. Most are questions that could be easily answered if you were paying attention.
     

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