Tips for grading faster and more efficiently?

Discussion in 'High School' started by jennyscout, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. jennyscout

    jennyscout Rookie

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    Apr 6, 2008

    Hello! I just started teaching high school and am slammed with 180 assignments on a regular basis. I spent most of my spring break trying to dig out of the mess of papers I have. I would LOVE to hear how other high school teachers (I teach English) handle this beast. I have already figured out that the more I raise my pen to write something, the longer it will take me to finish the stack. Any interruption kills my speed. I also know that rubrics are a good thing and I use them. I think I just have to create better rubrics (I have used Rubistar).

    I do have three periods of T.A.s and they help me with routine assignments; however, they make mistakes. They're teenagers after all. So sometimes I spend time trying to figure out what went wrong.

    I feel like I work at a paper factory. I did create a form to help me organize papers and communicate with T.A.s, but still all this work makes me feel more like a machine and less like a teacher.

    I use Gradekeeper software, which I find is okay. What do you use?
    Thank you!
    :eek:
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    When you grade essays, are you correcting their mistakes? When I taught middle school, I started out doing that, then realized how much time it was taking. I started putting a slash mark in the margin of the line where there was an error, and it sped up the process quite a bit. Also, figure out what your goal is with each assignment, and grade for that aspect only. For example, if it was a persuasive essay, I graded on how well they persuaded only. Of course, there were assignments when I graded for grammar and mechanics and all that, just not every assignment.
     
  4. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    I grade everything, so I cannot suggest for you to only grade certain assignments as I don't think that is right. If you assign it, you grade it thats my rule. Can you be more specific in the areas you need help in
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I don't feel that it's necessary to grade every piece of student work which graces my desk. I think that student grades should be more summative than formative, meaning that their finished product should matter more than their practice along the way.

    This doesn't mean that I don't scan assignments not being taken for credit--I most certainly do. But rather than digging deep into the assignment to look for every single incorrect response, I look over the paper in order to find out whether the student has a feel for the task. When I begin to notice patterns of incorrect responses in student work, I will use that info to reteach.

    We spend a lot of time in class doing self-corrections. Students grade their own work as we go through things together aloud or on the board. I find that students who care about getting the right answers will pay attention and take those correction sessions more seriously than they will take a number written at the top of their paper handed back days after they completed the assignment.

    You might not like my system, and that's okay. :) It doesn't work for everyone or in all types of classes.

    You could also consider staggering your due dates so that you're not slammed with 180 papers on the same day. It's easier to do this when you teach different courses, because I know that you will want to keep all your sections of the same course at the same place.

    Using rubrics is definitely a time-saver when it comes to grading. Rubrics also help ensure fair grading practices because they are a little more objective. The better the rubric, the better the student work, I think. Rubistar is good; you can also do a google search for "English I rubrics" or something along those lines to see what other teachers use.

    I would probably avoid having student assistants grade student work. Like you said, kids do make a lot of mistakes. I'd hate for some of those mistakes to be intentional--like where an assistant purposely gave a higher score to a friend or took extra points off the paper of a kid he didn't like. It is a lot of work to re-grade something after it's been graded incorrectly.


    Good luck! :)
     
  6. OrangeBlossum

    OrangeBlossum Rookie

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    Apr 6, 2008

    I have been teaching for 10 years and I still get completely overwhelmed by grading. I try really hard to stay on top of it, but I also think if you assign it, you should grade it.
    That said, some things are easier to grade than others... take map quizzes.... easy. Quick quizzes... easy. Optional HW packets... easy. But, then, even with rubrics --> Research papers, DBQs, essays.... all take me forever to grade. But, I want to give feedback.
     
  7. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Are there some things that students can grade each other's paper and then turn them in?
     
  8. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    First of all, it does get better the longer you have done it. I am able to grade much quicker now.

    I don't fix every single mistake. Usually the first few, and that's it.

    I set aside a chunk of time for grading. I don't do a few here and a few there when I do essays because then I get too inconsistent.

    Sometimes I find going somewhere, like a coffee shop or diner, helps me get a lot more done faster than I would if I was just sitting around my house or at work. There is only one thing I have to work on if i take it somewhere - not distracted by other stuff i have to do.

    The rubric is a great idea. See if your state has a rubric for state testing. That is what ours is modeled on for our district. And the more explanation that is on the rubric, the less you have to write. You can just highlight or circle the statements that match the paper.
     
  9. jennyscout

    jennyscout Rookie

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    Yes, for this particular set of papers, I was correcting grammar mistakes. Thanks for the slash tip and suggestion to focus on one area. That helps a heap. Another teacher just told me to put + and - in the margins. I like circling the grammar etc mistakes because then I can see how much their grammar needs to be worked on.

     
  10. jennyscout

    jennyscout Rookie

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    Apr 9, 2008

    I would love to know how teachers keep track of 180 papers/kids. I feel like I'm running a business, and my t.a.s are my employees.

    I need a better software gradekeeper. Anyone have any recs?



     
  11. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    This is my first year and about 3 months ago, I realized that I don't have to grade every single thing the students do. Sometimes, if they are doing a cut and paste creative project, I do the method of if they did it and turned it in they get the points. That saves time so because i go through the stack and look for a name and mark it down. I have about 153 students 9th/10th. I grade for particulars, I teach history, not English, so I don't over extend on the semantics. I do make sure the paper makes sense and flows-if i see random spelling errors or grammar I fix it but may not count against it.
     
  12. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    lol. What's a cut and paste creative project? sounds like an oxymoron.
     
  13. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Apr 10, 2008

    To keep track of all papers I have a student collect all papers, alphabetize them, clip them together, put a stick note noting the students who did not turn them in, and then palce them in that class' hand in bin.

    For some worksheets I'll have my student teacher or teacher's assistant grade them.
     
  14. wig

    wig Devotee

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    Apr 10, 2008

    Sorry: this is kind of long.

    I use engrade for record keeping. I don't know that it is any better or worse than any other grading program. I found it to be easier than some and it is free. But in any case, that doesn't help with your original question.

    I have a ton of core subjects that I teach because I am in a small school. I agree with Brendon for the most part - if you assign it it should be graded. There are some assignments where I just check for completeness - especially when it is subjective and it is for practice purposes only, but for the most part I grade pretty much everything.

    Here is what I do:

    1. Try not to have major projects (like essays) due the same day. I try to leave two days between each.

    2. Anything that is objective gets graded in class. They grade their own putting the correct answer down in red ink. (I strongly am opposed to grading each others papers) By grading it in class they get immediate feedback and can ask questions. I teach two writing/grammar classes so I realize that there are not as many objective assignments as in Lit and SS. Writing teachers should be given an extra planning period in my opinion.

    4. For your writing assignments pick only three or four things that you are going to be looking at specifically. For instance, in grammar we have been working on using a thesaurus to write stronger verbs, adjectives and adverbs. Skillwise we have been working on varying sentence beginnings. For our next writing assignment, I am going to give them a story beginning of a two or three paragraphs. They will finish the story with three more paragraphs. I will grade the majority of it on use of strong words, varying sentence beginnings, and writing a clear organized ending to the story. Those count as x5 on my rubric. The rest will be a x1 on on formatting, sentence structure, and conventions. I do not spend a lot of time looking for errors as that is not my main focus. I circle the error if I run across it. An assignment like this would probably take about three to five minutes each to grade and record. The first drafts are peer edited in goups of three to four - not for conventions but for the main focus of the assignment. They have a checklist. It also includes having students read aloud. As they are doing that I walk around the room, I listen to the stories being read aloud and give suggestions. I try to watch for stories being read aloud by students needing the most help. In our school all papers from grades 5 - 8 must be typed. They give me the first typed copy. (Typing BTW makes grading go MUCH faster) I glance through it and make suggestions. The final copy is due three days later. I confess it took me years to come up with this, but in the long run grading writing assignments is not as daunting as it used to be.

    5. When we were practicing using stronger words in our writing, I gave them a very simplistically written paragraph. They had to rewrite it adding and replacing "boring" words. They then highlighted these words. That made grading it faster also. Highlighters are a great tool as it also helps them to focus on what we are practicing. When we practiced varying sentence beginnings I gave them a paragraph where almost everything began with the same or similar words. They had t rewrite it using a different beginning to every sentence. So when they to their next essay, I will have them highlight the first two words of every sentence in their drafts to help them focus on varying beginnings. They will also use a different color highlighter to highlight their strong words. Drafts BTW are always stapled to the back of their final copies. It makes for a thick packet by the time we have their first and sometimes second draft, their typed draft and their final.
     
  15. GatorGal

    GatorGal Cohort

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    Apr 10, 2008

    I have my students keep Interactive Notebooks. All the practice writing, journals, vocab, etc go immediately into the notebook. I do a lot of spot checking during class on a clipboard. I read through their responses to make sure that they are understanding the concept, and then check them off for it. I don't always enter everything into the computer though.

    For bigger assignments, I collect, grade, and then pass back for them to glue into their notebooks.

    The notebooks are AWESOME! I never have stacks and stacks of papers around me.

    As far as essay grading goes though, I'm still looking for a quick way to grade them. :confused:
     
  16. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Wig, do the papers they grade on their own go in the gradebook as an accuracy or completion grade?
     
  17. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    I might add that for my Algebra I class I only check most homework for completion and effort because they are learning new skills each day and applying them differently. I do this sometimes in Social Studies, however I feel that they are using the same skills in their worksheets as used before, but at a different topic or level, therefore I feel that they should be graded.
     
  18. wig

    wig Devotee

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    Most of the time it goes in the grade book (Grammar, Study Skills, and SS). The only writing utensil they have is the colored pen I give them and their desk is cleared. There is no opportunity for cheating. (I usually have to check over my ADD kids' papers because they sometimes lose their focus after a minute or two. ) They get two extra points for writing the correct answers down when we are going over it in class.

    I mark it as a completion grade if it something brand new and it is a practice. But as you said, that does not happen often in SS.
     
  19. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Apr 12, 2008

    2 extra points for each written down answer or 2 points to each final grade.
     
  20. wig

    wig Devotee

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    To the final grade. I'm not THAT nice. :lol:
     
  21. Calliope

    Calliope Companion

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    One thing I did with student writing -- I was assigning a topic for a generative paragraph at the beginning of every class. I wanted them to have the practice, & I wanted them to settle into class, but I did not want to grade 150 papers every day. I gave them a completion grade of a 0, 1/2, or all credit for a small number of points. After they had done several, I handed all the papers back, told them to pick the best one, had them revise that one, type it (I also used it for a lesson in MLA formatting & citation, including a WC page), & turn it into me for a bigger grade. I graded those for content, grammar, etc.

    I do think that kids should get a grade for things they do. So sometimes I give a completion grade -- if it was just a practice thing. Frequently their homework is read ___ & take notes. I walk around the class while they are doing their grammar exercise, & I spot check their notes. I skim what they've done & give all, partial, or no credit & enter it immediately into the grade book. And, I've also learned not to assign more work than I can grade.
     
  22. BeckyPie7

    BeckyPie7 Companion

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    Apr 23, 2008

    I teach English also. This is my second year. It can be really overwhelming to have hundreds of papers to grade and it does stack up very quickly. I do feel like I should grade everything that a student turns in, however, I have a check system that makes things a bit easier.
    If the assignment is simply "class work" (i.e. not essays, or tests, or quizzes, or homework), I scan the work. If I can see they are getting something totally wrong I'll make marks on it. If I see they got the gist of the assignment I mark the paper with a check plus. If they didn't complete it I mark it with a check. If they barely did anything, I mark it with a check minus. If they didn't do it at all, that's a zero.
    This really helps me speed through things that don't need as much of my time and attention. It also gives me more time to focus on grading other assignment.
     
  23. senseijoao

    senseijoao Rookie

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    Apr 30, 2008

    I LOVE engrade.com . They've been upgrading it recently, and it is really a workhorse, especially if you post weekly updates to the grades.
     
  24. wig

    wig Devotee

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    I have to agree. It is great! Easy, parents can have access to it. It is accessable from any computer.

    We had to switch to one of those "one program does all for the entire school". No where near as user friendly as Engrade.
     
  25. KDS

    KDS Companion

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    there is a new product that is going to be introduced REAL soon (so i have been promised) that might help with grading individual papers.

    http://www.edugrader.com/

    it is an electronic ped that will do the averaging for you!

    I love the idea! i havent see the episodes of Everyday Edisons on PBS, but it looks like the coolest and i have asked for a demo to be sent to the station!

    GO CHECK IT OUT!!!!!
     
  26. MrU82

    MrU82 Rookie

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    if you're a high school teacher...use AWESOME teaching assistants. My T.A.s grade harder than I do. LOL kinda sad actually. Im way too nice when it comes to grading.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2008
  27. BeckyPie7

    BeckyPie7 Companion

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    It would be so nice to have T.A.s. We sort of do have aids but they are students and I wouldn't trust many of them. They've been known to steal test keys and answers. They also give everyone 100%. :)
     
  28. MrU82

    MrU82 Rookie

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    Wow that sucks. My T.A.s are students too but I have never had a problem with that. Then again my T.A.s are former students of mine and good kids. They are seniors too so the last thing they want at that point is to screw up their graduation chances. They are hard graders too...which is the best part.
     
  29. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We're not allowed to let our student aides grade papers. It stinks. :(
     
  30. MrU82

    MrU82 Rookie

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    My T.A.s dont really grade papers. I just have them grade/check mark classwork/homework assignments. I grade major writing assignments and essay tests. Multiple choice tests and little assignments are graded by T.As. One of my T.As wants to be a teacher so she takes the grading very seriously. Shes awesome...like a little secretary..she sets everything up, asks me to input grades sometimes, and will be a good teacher one day.
     
  31. wunderwhy

    wunderwhy Comrade

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    When I was in tenth grade I graded my sister's tenth grade students' essays! And she taught at a private school and had something like two classes of fifteen students, so in retrospect I'm not sure why she needed help getting it done!

    I don't think it's realistic to grade everything that students do in class, at least for me teaching honors English. I don't want to teach students that they should only pay attention or participate in class because they will receive a grade for that specific action. Sometimes a grammar or vocabulary exercise is simply to help them learn the material and do well on a quiz or test later. I regularly hand out study guides and crossword puzzles based on vocabulary quizzes which the kids know will not be graded but which will help them learn the material should they choose to do it.

    We also aren't allowed to have students do grading, and so little of my grading is straight multiple choice since it is so easy to set up systems (coughing, tapping, fingers on the side of your head -- these are straight from the mouths of our students!) or text-message to cheat that it wouldn't help me much anyway. Grading writing--giving feedback on syntax, diction, mechanics, organization, flow, analysis, etc.--takes a lot of time.

    I do think that we've stopped focusing on how to write correctly, and our kids are suffering for it. When I grade essays, I make an effort to correct errors using copy-editing symbols. I'd rather give thorough, meaningful feedback and take longer returning the essays than return them quickly with little decipherable feedback. I also try to design very specific checklists for rough drafts (My paper jumps right into the topic, my paper is lacking a thesis, too many of my sentences start the same way, I am lacking topic sentences, etc.) so that I can make checks rather than write long notes. And then for the final drafts, I likewise try to design very specific rubrics.

    I've also found that if you hand a kid a paper full of your scribbles and circles, they'll just look at the grade. So I conference with students as much as possible while the rest of the class does self-directed work, at least for the first few essays.

    My class moves at a rapid pace. We read at least ten novels or plays a year. We have at least two major writing assignments each marking period. We learn 500 vocabulary words and do several grammar units. I know I give more grades than the other teachers because we can log into the grade program as our students, and I can see my journalism students' English grades. I am giving a lot more grades than the other teachers, and if I gave a grade for every little assignment I wouldn't be able to have a life outside of work. And frankly, I think I give so much work that the students don't notice if a few things don't wind up graded.
     
  32. ambritlit

    ambritlit Companion

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    May 25, 2008

    I also struggle with grading essays. I have 6 classes, and I am overwhelmed when these essays start coming in. We are on a block schedule, so I only get a prep every other day. I expected to spend some time at home grading, but this is ridiculous.
     
  33. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    What's your grading method?
     
  34. dtrim

    dtrim Rookie

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    When I taught English, I found grading papers overwhelming, too. Here's what I did: following each essay assignment, I'd be sure to assign reading for a few days. I'd give the class 30 minutes to read during our 90-minute block. While students read, I'd call a student to my desk, read his paper silently with him next to me while giving him feedback in a quiet voice. I'd say, "I'm confused here," or "I really like this support." As I went, I'd circle the grammar/spelling/usage problem that was most prevalent in the essay. At the end, I'd give him my overall impression and tell him the overall grammar/spelling/usage problem in the essay. Then I'd fill out the six traits rubric and tell him to correct the subject/verb agreement problems I'd circled or the run-on sentences to raise the conventions grade.

    Next!

    The whole meeting took about 3-5 minutes, the essays weren't splashed with red ink, the kid had good feedback and a real audience, and I finished that class's stack in class over a few days' time.

    I developed this little trick when I took a summer journalism fellowship and I found out I really, really hated red, but I really, really liked writer's conferences and feedback.
     
  35. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    dtrim, I think that's an excellent idea! I think I will try to incorporate this technique in my classes next year for translation assignments.

    Thanks! :)
     
  36. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2008

    Fabulous idea, dtrim! I will have to speak to the teachers I will be working with next year and try to promote more of this type of conferencing.
     
  37. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Grading killed me until I stopped grading everything. I came to realize that I could grade just about anything by glancing at the first few lines. Essays, of course, are different but if you try to check for just specific things on each essay (as opposed to checking grammar, transititions, punctuation, etc. every time) you can still give solid feedback and save yourself time.
     
  38. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Jun 21, 2008

    I have also had to discipline myself to not correct every little mistake, but it's hard. At this years CATE (California English teachers) conference I heard Kelly Gallagher speak about his method, which emphasizes first draft input. I think it's brilliant - you can read about it in his book Teaching Adolescent Writers.
     
  39. touchinglives

    touchinglives Companion

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    Will someone give more input on students grading each other's work (objective only) verses grading their own work. After years of grading everything myself, I finally "gave in" last year and started letting the kids switch papers and grade on occasion. I decided this would be a review for the kids as well as a help to me, and I thought being responsible for another student's paper instead of their own would make them listen more closely. I also thought if the kids know others would see their work that they would try harder, but am I looking at this the wrong way?

    Thanks
     
  40. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I've had kids swap papers and grade little things like our 5-point daily quizzes. What I found was that an alarming number of students didn't pay attention to the correct answers and/or wanted to give their classmate extra points. In the end, it's always been easier for me to grade these myself or have my student aide do it because there's less chance of a screw up.

    Have you considered allowing students to grade their own assignments? It would provide immediate feedback, which they surely need. And if you required that they fix their incorrect answers in order to earn full points, they might be more likely to actually care what they did wrong (rather than just glancing at the score at the top and forgetting about it, which they all do).

    In any case, I wouldn't assign much or any point value to assignments graded in class. It's just too easy for students to be dishonest, and their grades should not reflect that. I recommend only taking those assignments for completion grades, or for no grade at all.
     
  41. dtrim

    dtrim Rookie

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    Ooh. Students grading other students' work is a dangerous move.

    The Supreme Court in Owasso Independent School District v. Falvo ruled that students can grade one another's papers and not violate FERPA laws.

    Nevertheless, many school districts have policies against it. Maybe it's the fact that the case went to the Supreme Court that has them jittery.

    Anyway, before you get calls from irate mommies or irritated principals, I'd see what your district's policy is.

    Really, if it's something for a completion grade, I'd recommend walking around to make sure papers are completed while students work on something else. Then, have each person grade his or her own paper.

    Some things are just not worth it.

    Best wishes for success,

    Diane
     

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