Timed Multiplication Tests

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by MissKH81, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

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    Apr 16, 2010

    Do you do timed multiplication tests with 100 problems in 5 minutes? If so, how do you do it, what are your rules, etc. I'm just curious about how the rest of you do this. Thanks :)
     
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  3. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Apr 17, 2010

    I do 20 problems in 1 minute every day. The kids each have a packet of 4 pages. The packets go from multiplying by 2s through the 12s. After I time them for a minute, only the kids who finished all 20 or who need a new packet leave their folders out. I grade only those folders each day (it takes anywhere from 2-10 minutes usually). They have to pass each level 2 times before they move up.

    I have an ice cream sundae board that goes with it. Each child has a piece of construction paper with their name on it on a bulletin board. When they pass their 2s they earn a spoon, 3s they earn a bowl, 4s they learn a banana, and so on. At the end of the year we have an ice cream sundae party to celebrate how well they did with multiplication. (And everyone gets ice cream, even if they didn't pass all of it.)
     
  4. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Apr 27, 2010

    I started using multiplication.com this year for timed tests. They will automatically correct them for you and they can be printed. Saves a lot of time.
     
  5. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Apr 27, 2010

    I think I'm stealing this plan for next year!! Can you tell me a little more about what it takes to "pass" a level?
     
  6. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Apr 28, 2010

    They have to finish all 20 problems on their page correctly two different times. We do one test a day, so they could pass a level in two days if they've been practicing.
     
  7. 2tired2teach

    2tired2teach Companion

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    Jul 3, 2010

    timed multiplication packets

     
  8. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Jul 3, 2010

     
  9. 2tired2teach

    2tired2teach Companion

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    Jul 4, 2010

    Thanks far from home, I've gotcha!
     
  10. Miss JE

    Miss JE Companion

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    Jul 20, 2010

    I have changed how I do tests each year and am changing once again (too new and complicated and not thought out enough to post here but going with some district math research about multiplication facts).... Last year I did similar to the above - earning the sundae, taking timed tests... One change I made last year that I liked was the order of doing the math facts. Traditionally we go 2s. 3s, 4s, 5s, 6s, 7s... It makes more sense to me now to do them in an order based off of what they already know - they can all (usually) count by 2s, 5s and 10s... so why not start with 2s, 5s, 10s After that I threw in 9s because there are so many strategies to learn them.... Then I did 4s because they are just double 2s and then 3s and then 6s (they are double 3s)... and then there were just a few left to learn... it sounds a little confusing but it is building off what they already know and teaching them how to use that to build strategies to solve other problems!

    So this is the order I taught them last year...

    2,5,10,9,4,3,6,square numbers, remaining facts (7 and 8)

    If I can link our district information to this I will as it explains it a bit better than I did!
     
  11. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jul 20, 2010

    Consider whatever test you use to not let kids skip any facts. Some struggling kids will search the sheet for facts they know while avoiding ones they don't. It's possible a student could score 90% and receive an "A" while skipping all the 8s and 9s on the test.
     
  12. ashley57

    ashley57 Comrade

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    Jul 21, 2010

    We used a program called "Multiplication Power" at the end of this year. In FL, memorizing facts is a 4th grade standard, but we had time at the end of the year, so we worked on it. We paired it with an ice cream party, too. :)

    It's a 7 day program. It assumes knowledge of the Zero and Identity Properties as well as the rule of 10s and Commutative Property (if they learn 5x6, then 6x5 is fair game and is not "directly" taught). Given this, it pulls memorization of 100 facts into memorizing 36.

    A specific set of problems was introduced daily. We wrote the facts on index cards and make necklaces, practice at school, and the kids practice at home. They take the quiz the next day (2-3 minutes, per the program). They have to pass them all to move to the next level. I allowed them to miss one, but I would randomly quiz them sometime the next day. Any problems that are learned could show up in the quizzes in future days (there were usually 18 facts), so there was additional accountability. Here's the scope and sequence:

    Day 1 - Square numbers (2x2, 3x3, 4x4, 5x5, 6x6, 7x7, 8x8, 9x9...8 problems PLUS "fair game" review: 0s, 1s, 10s)
    Day 2 - 5s (2x5, 3x5, 4x5, 6x5, 7x5, 8x5, 9x5...7 problems PLUS "fair game" review: 0s, 1s, 10s, and Squares. Note that 5x5 was not taught directly as it was learned in Day 1)
    Day 3 - 2s (3x2, 4x2, 6x2, 7x2, 8x2, 9x2...6 problems PLUS anything that is "fair game" review: 0s, 1s, 10s, Squares, 5s. 2x2 and 5x2 were taught in days 1 and 2)
    Day 4 - 3s (4x3, 6x3, 7x3, 8x3, 9x3...5 problems PLUS "fair game" review: 0s, 1s, 10s, Squares, 5s, 2s)
    Day 5 - 4s (6x4, 7x4, 8x4, 9x4...4 problems PLUS "fair game" review)
    Day 6 - 6s (7x6, 8x6, 9x6...3 problems PLUS "fair game" review)
    Day 7 - 7s and 8s (8x7, 9x7, 9x8...3 problems PLUS "fair game" review)

    I was amazed at how well it worked. I stressed the Commutative Property as we did each day. The kids blew me away.

    This was done at the end of the year. I strongly feel that the concept needs to be taught and understood before facts are memorized. It was a fun summative activity!
     
  13. ashley57

    ashley57 Comrade

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    Jul 21, 2010

    On second thought, it may have been called "Seven Days to Multiplication"...
     
  14. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2010

    This is fantastic! Explain your process for these tests. What is their expected time since there are 36 problems? How often do you have them take these tests? Thanks so much for this :)
     
  15. kidsr#1

    kidsr#1 Companion

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    Jul 29, 2010

    Mad Minutes

    Once my third graders have learned all of their multiplication facts I will give them a timed-test for each group. We have also done a "Banana Split" party. I make sure that all kids are able to participate. Some students because of disabilities cannot complete the test in 2 minutes, so I modify as needed.

    I have taught up to fifth grade and have used the Mad Minutes book. I plan on starting my year off with basic addition facts. I give students 1 minute to complete as many problems as possible correctly. We grade together as a class (students grade in pen as I call out the answers). I don't count these towards a Math grade, however students keep track of their scores on a calendar I have printed out for them each month. I make sure to reinforce honesty is best, they are only hurting themselves if I pick up papers and they have been dishonest.

    In my opinion Mad Minutes help to reinforce memory and students don't have to rely on touch points or other strategies.
     
  16. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2010

    This sounds great! You mentioned that you give 2 minutes to complete the problems. How many problems are there?
     
  17. 2tired2teach

    2tired2teach Companion

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    Aug 7, 2010

    yes I would like to know How many problems? Thanks!
     

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